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  1. #1
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    isolated systolic hypertension.

    So, I am 32, fit, eat fairly healthy and have a case of "isolated systolic hypertension." which means my BP usually looks like 140/80 I have had this ever since high school but now the Doc's are talking medication. Any ideas?

  2. #2
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    Is it getting worse? Do you have frequent headaches that you didn't have before. Red ears?
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  3. #3
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    No symptoms that I know of. I've always had those BP readings. I'm a corporate pilot so I have to get a medical every 6mths. Of course I don't know how good I could feel if I had it around 120 or so.

  4. #4
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    Have they told you about what type of medicine you could be taking?
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  5. #5
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    Not yet.

  6. #6
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    white coat

    For what it is worth -- I'm 28 and went through this crap a few years ago. It turns out I think I have white coat. My readings were much like yours -- I got the monitor, the 24 cuff, did the kidney echo (renal echogram or whatever) -- the whole nine and spent a fortune getting checked out -- they put me on something for a little while -- but I wanted to know what was causing it.
    Well, after much testing, etc. -- my girlfriend got a medical grade psnee..blah blah blah to measure my blood pressure and a stethescope and it's pretty much 120/65 everytime she takes it.

    You may want to try that route -- it's a weird phenomenon -- I don't feel anxious around docs but apparently it is not that uncommon.
    Try it -- it was only a few hundred for the meter and scope --
    HOpe everything works out. I skydive so I need to make sure you pilots are healthy..haha.

  7. #7
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    Good info.

    I was first diagnosed when I was 18. I was a nationals level competitive swimmer (so I was in ok shape needless to say). They sent me in for all the tests like you had -and had the same results. They determined at that time that my system had not figured out where it wanted to be and they gave it some name that I have since forgotten. White coat was partly to blame as well. And it was crazy high back then 190/100 ouch! Well, since then, It has settled down to 140/80. I do notice a bit higher of a jump when I am at the docs office. I do have all the checking stuff. Both the real thing and the automatic cuff form walmart. They both give the same readings.
    So we are fairly sure it is from my grandmother! I really want to fix this with diet. I daresay I am as fit as I can get for now. I am looking at a list of food stuffs that I can add that may drop my systolic 10-15 points or so.

    Thanks for all the input so far......

  8. #8
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    Yeah, I am in pretty good shape myself --- race mountain bikes occasionally, rock climb -- used to race motorcycles. I have a desk job though so I sit a lot -
    Definitely keep exercising -- I need to workout more but working it putting a kink in that...

    Diet -- yeah, that's key. I eat as well as I can -- I splurge here and there. But I never salt my food -- try to eat a lot of fruits/veg -

    I'm surprised to hear the cuff and electronic monitor have the same results though -- I don't see how those things are acurate. I have a skinny arm and depending on how thick your skin is -- it may pick up the pulse differently -- I'm not an expert but...

    Are you taking your measurements after sitting for 5-8 minutes or so? That is also key -- the docs always walk you back, then immediately take it -- so it'll always be a little higher. I usually sit for about 5 minutes -- relax and then take 2 or three readings.

    It's weird because I bet if no one had even said anything to you - you'd probably not have high readings at all -- just the constant thinking about it (like I do -- less now but it still pops in my head here and there) -- is a negative bio feedback...

    Stay positive though -- there is always perspective -- try not to lose sight of that. At least you have both your legs, you can ride, etc. etc.....lots to be thankful for....easier said I know --

    But another note -- be careful before you just start taking meds -- make sure they know you are a pilot. The cardiologist I started seeing when I didn't trust my regular phys said he could have killed me because I was in such good shape and my bp would drop so low at night -- that with the meds, it could have cause me to stroke out...so flying might be the same..I don't know -- thinner air -- thinner blood? Do your homework and don't just trust what the doc says -- be your own doc. They don't know everything -- it's a business these days mostly -- I came in and told the doc the meds weren't working -- he said, ok let's increase the dosage -- when in fact I did some research and that was not the thing to do.
    Luckily I'm off the meds now and hope to keep it that way.
    Cheers,
    Paul

  9. #9
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    Great info. Thanks.

    I will give this a try: "Are you taking your measurements after sitting for 5-8 minutes or so? That is also key -- the docs always walk you back, then immediately take it -- so it'll always be a little higher. I usually sit for about 5 minutes -- relax and then take 2 or three readings."

    Thanks again!

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