Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Ride Responsibly
    Reputation: LWright's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,937

    ibuprofen and lactic acid?

    will ibuprofen slow the onset of lactic acid burn?
    I have been walking up a lot of hills lately after my legs start burning.
    Friday I was told to take ibuprofen every 4 hours after some serious dental work, which I have been doing. Today I went on my normal ride, expecting to be walking, but damed if I didn't clear most of the hills without the legs burning.
    Fluke or science?

  2. #2
    The plough
    Reputation: vmajor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    662
    Ibuprofen is a pain killer, and an anti inflammatory agent.
    Lactic acid buildup causes pain and localised tissue damage perhaps causing inflammation.
    Ibuprofen kills pain and reduces inflammation.

    Ergo, you did not feel pain.

    Ibuprofen and other (NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti inflammatory agents)) are not a fee lunch. Long term use will cause damage to your stomach mucosa, causing various ailments, none of them pretty. Some NSAIDs also cause direct damage to your kidneys, which is especially apparent if you are dehydrated, for example while cycling. This is also not good.

    In conclusion: use the meds only for the conditions they were prescribed or designed for.

    Cheers,

    V.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,208
    I would think not...
    But it appears I am wrong =)

    In a 1993 study of the effect of an over-the-counter antiinflammatory (ibuprofen) on DOMS, researchers compared subjects given ibuprofen four hours before weight lifting (pre-lifting group) to subjects given ibuprofen 24 hours after lifting. Results showed that the pre-lifting ibuprofen group reported 40% to 50% less soreness than the after-lifting group, proving in this study that ibuprofen taken before exercise reduced soreness more than taking it after. A limitation of this study was the lack of a control group of subjects who did not take ibuprofen after working out to compare with subjects who did to see if ibuprofen helps at all after exercise. To answer this question, a study in 2003 investigated subjects who took ibuprofen or sham (placebo) every eight hours for 48 hours after they lifted weights. The ibuprofen group reported less soreness than the sham group, proving that ibuprofen worked when taken after exercise. From these studies, it appears as if some people will respond to taking antiinflammatories before working out, and others will respond when they take it afterward. How hard you lift, how long you rest, and your level of activity when not working out will factor in to the equation as well.
    source: http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=78966&page=2

    Either way, I myself would not get into the habit of taking Ibuprofen chronically. Firstly because even though it is OTC it is still a drug and should be used when needed. Secondly, if taking habitually you're body will get adjust to a certain dosage and you'll need more and more Ibuprofen to stay level. Thirdly, damage; Ibuprofen taken long enough can cause kidney damage, especially if not taken with enough water.

    On a lighter note,perhaps the Ibuprofen isn't reducing your soreness but instead your body is getting stronger

  4. #4
    ride like you stole it
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    681
    Lactic acid will go away in just under a week, so if you took some time off it will make a difference. Also I don't now if this is true but in high school my XC coach would have us eat bananas after a hard work because he said the potassium helps deal with lactic acid.
    I lubed my disc brakes because they squeaked.
    Man was that fun to work out

  5. #5
    I can't weld
    Reputation: Indiefab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    546
    Good hydration will help protect your kidneys and also helps your body eliminate the lactic acid more quickly.
    I'm a kidney specialist and I take advil as my primary anti-inflammatory. I usually avoid it before hot summer rides, and I'm also young (33) and have no other diseases that can hurt my kidneys. My body does recover more quickly if I take 2 before a ride, though.

  6. #6
    SSolo
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,503
    Quote Originally Posted by spcarter
    Lactic acid will go away in just under a week, so if you took some time off it will make a difference. Also I don't now if this is true but in high school my XC coach would have us eat bananas after a hard work because he said the potassium helps deal with lactic acid.
    Bananas have potassium and it does help with muscle soreness and IIRC muscle building.
    Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life son...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •