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  1. #1
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    Hey man, you ok?

    So, long story short: my wheels slide out around a dusty turn. I go for a slide. I sprain my wrist and slice my forearm open real nice. Blood is all over me. I mean this thing bled like a faucet down my arm, all over my shorts, splatter on my shirt. I ride (slowly) back to my care. One arm is dead from my sprain. The other is leaking blood all over. I pull up next to my car and am a little dazed and confused. This dude is getting ready for his ride and makes a point to not "look" at me at all. No "hey man, you ok?"; no, "wow, what happened to you." No nothing. Unbelievable. I'm standing like 6 feet from this f&cker cleaning my bloody arm with my camel back water and a bandana and this guy acts like he doesn't see. It would have been impossible.

    Long story shorter: I'm fine. My cut is healing well and my wrist is manageable. But, what the h3ll is wrong with people--cyclist? It really left a bad taste in my mouth. I've heard others talk about this "problem" of hyper-competative, spiteful mountain biker with personality problems. I was amazed, obviously. Just had to share.

  2. #2
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    WoW! That's really sad. Up in my neck of the woods 95% of riders will stop and ask/offer help even if it's just a flat tire. At least you're ok.
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  3. #3
    The Martian
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    If you were 6ft from a guy getting ready for his ride you were standing (emphasis on the standing) in a parking lot or very very close to one. Yes, a courtesy "you ok man" would have been nice, but it's not like he passed you up 5miles out with an obviously crippled bike and obvious wounds either. I can't say I wouldn't have done the same thing in a parking lot at a trail head assuming the person looked "ok" enough to drive home/somewhere, but I would have DEFINITELY stopped on the trail no matter the circumstances. So I guess I'm a hyper competative (never raced) mt. biker with personality problems because I would have assumed that because you biked out, were standing, now in some simblance of civilization and theoretically really close to your car, and tending to your arm that you were capable of either a) getting yourself home or b) asking me for assistance (cell phone or the like) if you really were in a bind. O well...

  4. #4
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    Yeah, decency is overated anyways!
    This space for rent

  5. #5
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    Are you serious?

    Quote Originally Posted by CougarTrek
    If you were 6ft from a guy getting ready for his ride you were standing (emphasis on the standing) in a parking lot or very very close to one. Yes, a courtesy "you ok man" would have been nice, but it's not like he passed you up 5miles out with an obviously crippled bike and obvious wounds either. I can't say I wouldn't have done the same thing in a parking lot at a trail head assuming the person looked "ok" enough to drive home/somewhere, but I would have DEFINITELY stopped on the trail no matter the circumstances. So I guess I'm a hyper competative (never raced) mt. biker with personality problems because I would have assumed that because you biked out, were standing, now in some simblance of civilization and theoretically really close to your car, and tending to your arm that you were capable of either a) getting yourself home or b) asking me for assistance (cell phone or the like) if you really were in a bind. O well...
    I would have for sure stopped 5 miles in to render aid and I would have for sure asked the guy in the parking lot if he was OK. Why go through the thought process of thinking: dude is standing, he's at his car, so what if he's covered in blood...don't think I'll say anything. For me my courteous nature is always on, I just can't help it. Treat others as you would want them to treat you. And after coming up on many serious crashes involving blood (some of them my own) I've started carrying latex gloves to put on before I get all messy. Got that from a nurse who came up on a crash me and others were at. She said she whips out her gloves first then dives in with help.
    A blind man searches in a dark room for a black hat that isn't there. Dashiell Hammett

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