Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tidelag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    45

    danger of injury by crawling climbing?

    Hi. For a few days ago I was on my SS at the road, and I decided to take a small roundabout where it is a small and steep hill, who I would see if I could manage to climb!

    Well, it did go fine, my arms became fatigued and my back hurted a little, while
    I was climbing, and I had a LOT of suffering!
    The legs was fine, as I climbed slowly with my whole body, relaxed and pedalling round, using whole legs and gravity. (I love my SPD-pedals)

    I have also climbed a more brutal hill (longer, becomes steeper at the end) at the road for few weeks ago, as I was crawling and drooling upwards at 8 km/t in the end
    - it maked me think:

    Could this be too harsh at my body so I would be injured permanently?

    I did not feel any pain afterward in my back, any kneeproblems or any injuries.
    My arms did have some pain the day after, but it is disappered now.

    My back was hurting while climbing and shortly after, and the reason could be that the muscles are still weak.
    I did get my lower back hurting in the first two weeks of SS, so it is stronger now!

    And no - I does not want to have lower gearing, as I am already too slow at the flatties...

  2. #2
    swag ho Administrator
    Reputation: francois's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1996
    Posts
    18,079
    Ha, ha... welcome to singlespeeder's heaven/hell.

    All your new muscles will get sore as you start using them. They will get sore, stronger and bigger.

    You have to relax. Even as your pounding the pedals with 5000 newton/ft of torque, you have to relax the rest of your body. Relax your neck, your hands etc. Keep your knees straight and maintain good posture.

    Listen to your body. If you have any pain that is not muscle soreness, there is a problem. Make adjustments, repeat, rinse...

    francois

  3. #3
    Reviewer/Tester
    Reputation: Rainman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    6,205

    Good job! What francois said..

    Plus... remind yourself to maintain 'form' on the climbs. I don't know about you, but I get a bit lazy sometimes and find myself doing stupid things like leaning too far forward over the bars and bending way over at the waist, or not working the bike from side to side hard enough...etc.. so I have to kick myself a bit and get back into the correct form and position.

    It's so easy to fall into bad habits...and that's when you hurt yourself.

    My muscles are always sore, but that's because i'm old ...


    R.
    It is inevitable ...

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tidelag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    45
    Good to hear! Thanks.
    I am actually leaning far over the bar, especially in the end of the hill.
    It makes easier for me to climb, especially in steep hills, where I am beginning to feel the cruel beast called PAIN!!!
    I shall take the hill again soon, to take a new look at my technique, since
    it was so brutal that I forgot to use my brain to register and observe...

    I does not have much force/pressure at my pedals, as I found out quickly that it exhausted me too much, my endurance is much better when I have a comfortable lever of power on the pedals, plus it spares my knees.

    I really enjoy the moments right after the hills, my legs are fatigued and slow, I need often several seconds to get my legs at "normal speed", while I am still pedaling with low force.
    My legs does even protest more if I try to coast. Funny!

  5. #5
    Reviewer/Tester
    Reputation: Rainman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    6,205

    Good job! Spin it out..

    It's a good idea not to stop pedalling after a climb.

    When you reach the top of the hill and go onto the flat or a downhill section, sit down and spin the gearing out...just spin the bike back up to speed again. 10 to 15 revolutions of the pedals is sufficient to loosen your legs up nicely.

    This will help alleviate the stiffness and soreness / fatigue from your legs and get the blood flowing properly again. Try it and see...


    R.
    It is inevitable ...

  6. #6
    Fahrrad fahren
    Reputation: Hjalti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    284
    Keep at it and you'll get addicted to the pain. Someone once said that pain was weakness leaving the body. I sure seem to have a lot of weakness to get rid of. Maybe we'll see you in Stockholm in August.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: burtondogs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    225

    ..

    Funny thing...

    SSing no longer makes me very sore.

    But the other day I went riding with a 1st time MTBer..
    I ended up going so damn slow that I found a whole new Muscle group.

    i was sore as hell the next day.

    Later
    Jim

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    385
    try to avoid leaning very far forward as you will lose traction spin out and when fatigued at the top of a hill maybe fall over and crack rib or knee i got my rib on the end of the handle bar doin exactly that a couple of months ago ride hard and fast!

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tidelag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    45
    Thanks again. I found out after few days that my left arm was somewhat sore, and my left hand was hurting. Well, well - no pain, no gain!
    The weird thing that the weakness/(mild)pain did actually occur right after the climbing, disappeared and stuck out again after around two days...
    Any comments?

    Traction is not a problem, since it is mostly at pavement, but
    thanks for the tips - I'll think at that in the winter or gravel.

    I tried some hills Thuesday, but - it was not so painful! damn...
    I'll take a "hill maraton", as soon I can.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tidelag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    45
    This thread needs a update.

    I got a fixie right after the SS-phase, and it is more brutal since the gearing is higher, but a fixie is more smooth, especially uphills, it feels more smooth to climb. Down the hills are more brutal than up the hills, the cadence goes from 110 to 140rpm. Scary or fun?

    I haven't experienced any permament damage or other ugly things after several brutal hills, even with 48:17. Climbing up in 6-8 km/t with 48:17 is a very special feeling and I have always recovered nicely, no permament damage on knees or at other weird places.

    My knees feels stronger and more stable now compared for 6 years ago. My arms are still the weak link as they burn out faster than legs. In the beginning I had some soreness and pain in my lower back, but it became better and stronger after several climbs and 5-6month. I keep my back straight and tried to held a smooth cadence while breathing deeply and steady. Sometimes I have been in trancelike mood and it's magical, especially when the body breaks aparts, and I am holding it together by pure will.

    Highly recommend, and if something feels wrong or weird in my body I stop or slows down. I always keep the knees straight and tries to have a smooth cadence up and down. When it's too much for me I just walk. Some days I go for the full victory when I'm in the right mood - going all the way pushing myself to see if I could cycle all-the-way-to-top-while-my-body-breaks-down.

    I love climbing!

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    12
    I'm 29 and have had two knee surgeries and pretty much no matter how good of shape I am in (I play beach volleyball twice a week, soccer once a week, I run, work out at the gym, and bike) I still get sore pretty much every single time I ride. I suppose if I'm not sore the next day I just feel like I didn't push myself enough?

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tidelag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    45
    Well... I am no doctor, so these are only my experience. Trust yourself and your own feeling in your body.

    I cannot really answer your question, it's difficult to really see what you want an answer for.

    Soreness is generally a good thing but if you got soreness after each trip, I don't know how it will go on the longer term. You're training on a higher level than me, as I will in no way be sore each day, and if I have to ride the next day I'll take it easy.

    Why should you push yourself hard all the time?
    I wouldn't worry if I didn't feel sore after a hard trip.

    When pushed myself too far into a awful climb years ago, hurted something, it felt wrong, and I found out that I couldn't be afraid of pain, but I couldn't ignore the warning signals from my body, so I had to know myself better: WHAT DO I FEEL? IT IS KNOWN PAIN? WHY? WHERE? I don't know how to explain, but it's something I am very careful of, and maybe that is the reason I haven't any damages yet.

    I have readed a little about training, bought even a book about triathlon, but I never saw an emotional aspect around hard cycling/training. It seems that many expect that the training is a robotic feeling.

    One of the reasons I started this thread was that my right knee have been weird 4-6 years (no pain, just weirness/tireness/soreness, while the other one was okay) and I decided that I would try a SS/fixie to see if my knees could be better, but I wasn't sure if it could be healthy on longer term. I felt that my knee didn't have muscles who could support the knees, the muscles on the backside of my knee was underdeveloped.
    I am a fat bastard. Gone up 24 pounds the last 2 years, which means alotta more fun uphills.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •