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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by ladljon View Post
    Severely torn Pereneal tendon and a piece of broken bone floating around between the nerves in my ankle. Got the bandages off in two weeks. Started riding with this boot cast.
    That's awesome.

    That also looks a wee bit like the bike I am now riding on the trails.

  2. #102
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    This thread has been a huge help. I busted up the end of my right tibia on 5/4/15 on my first ride in almost a year and wound up with (only) 4 screws and a good prognosis from my surgeon. I've had 2 weeks in a big splint, almost 2 weeks in a cast and will switch to a boot in a few days. The first two weeks booted will be non-weight bearing but with some exercises, then PT and gradual return to activity. My goal is to get at least one full mountain bike ride in before I turn 63 in October. I hope that's realistic. My cervical fusion happened much faster than expected, so hopefully that'll be the case with my ankle as well. I get the impression that the PT and recovery will take a lot longer though.
    I appreciated reading some of the comments about the mental aspect of recovery from this because that's been at least as hard for me as the physical part of it. I haven't been able to ride for almost a year because of cervical disk problems, then cervical fusion surgery in December and then hernia surgery in March. Seems like I've been recovering from one thing after another for the better part of a year. This is the longest I've been off a bike since 1986 and now that the prime riding weather is here it's been depressing to have to just sit and look at it.
    For a while I was unsure about returning to riding, but it's been such a crucial part of my life for so long, I know I won't be able to stay away from it. Plus, at my age there's no telling how many more years I'll be up to serious riding and I want to make the most of what's left. I just hope I'm not too gun shy when I do get back on the trails. It's never good to be tentative when mountain biking.
    We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.

  3. #103
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    Push as hard as you can in PT. My only regret was not being aggressive enough early on. Also get that wobble board (assuming it doesn't mess with your back). Best of luck with the recovery. If you have a trainer (or can buy one), put the bike on that in the house. For me, the psychological issues were probably my primary impediment (at least after 12 weeks).

    The other thing I did was I ordered a custom frame road bike, which gave me a goal to work up to.

  4. #104
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    4 weeks post surgery and I got my cast off yesterday. I'm now in a boot that looks like something a Star Wars storm trooper would wear. I can take it off for working on range of motion, sleeping, and showering (it felt *so* good to be able to wash off the stank!) and start PT and gradual weight bearing in two weeks. The doc said that I could start riding an exercise bike with zero resistance now if I want, though i don't have access to one, and could conceivably be walking without assistance in as soon as a month. It just depends on how the ankle feels once I start the weight bearing. I'm gonna work hard on the PT, but i'm not gonna rush my return to riding until I can build my leg strength and stability back up. I've been off the bike for almost a year now because of the cervical problems that hit me last summer, so I'm gonna approach it like I'm starting from scratch as a rookie. Strength training -> exercise bike -> road riding -> mountain bike once I get sufficient strength and stamina to hit the trails safely. The hardest part will be maintaining the self discipline to keep building up without jumping too far ahead too soon.
    We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.

  5. #105
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    If it's anything like mine was, putting weight back on it was VERY painful and occurred gradually over weeks. The nerve endings were firing on all cylinders.

    That being said, after 2 years of daily swelling discomfort resulting in my avoidance of being as active as I should have been, I decided to start pedaling again (on my exercise bike at first) which got the blood flowing to it really well, and reduced the swelling and all the ghost pains started to go away. (When I broke it, I was a whole week into getting back into biking after a 15 year hiatus.)
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  6. #106
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    So far the most painful thing has been sudden movement of the joint when I had the boot off and accidentally bumped my heal as i was lowering my leg, and again today when my crutch slipped out from under me on our deck after a hard rain and I went down. No damage done though.

    My doctor said the same thing about moving my leg on an exercise bike just to get the blood flowing to reduce the swelling. I'm gonna look into setting my road bike up on a wind trainer in the house if I've got some old platform pedals. I don't think this this storm trooper boot will work well with SPD pedals and I know it wouldn't feel too good if it slipped off unexpectedly.

    The thing that has me the most bummed out is how emaciated my leg is after not being used for over 6 weeks. I can't believe how much muscle mass I've lost. I hope it doesn't take too long to build it back up. It looks pretty pathetic.
    We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.

  7. #107
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    Oh, I have stories. I live alone, so had lots of challenges being a 40 year old, overweight smoker at the time, with a broken, tib, fib, and dislocated foot/ankle, especially since we were in the middle of a heatwave (13+ days over 100 right after it happened).

    I went back to work a week after my surgery, which was WAY too soon. All I had on my foot was a bunch of fluff wrapped with an adhesive ace holding it on. Anyway, had to go to the bathroom at work, so went in the handicapped stall, and of course the grab rail was on my bad side. The crutch slipped and I put that foot down...let out a nice scream...kinda ruined the moment.

    Shut my aircast in the car door one time, didn't have it all the way in. That twisted my ankle really nice before I realized what was happening.
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  8. #108
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    3 months since injury and surgery. Finished a month of PT (during which I weaned myself from the boot and worked hard to get flexibility and strength coming back) a week ago and started road riding. I'm actually more comfortable riding than walking except when a I hit a sharp bump with weight on that ankle. Each ride has been better and I was finally able to pedal standing a little bit yesterday. The only assist I use now for walking is a cane when things are really sore. The most surprising thing is the cramping I get along the outside of my leg in my upper calf. It's really painful if I try to raise up on my toes with that foot. I suspect it'll be a while longer before I have the strength for that.
    We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
    Push as hard as you can in PT. My only regret was not being aggressive enough early on. Also get that wobble board (assuming it doesn't mess with your back). Best of luck with the recovery. If you have a trainer (or can buy one), put the bike on that in the house. For me, the psychological issues were probably my primary impediment (at least after 12 weeks).

    The other thing I did was I ordered a custom frame road bike, which gave me a goal to work up to.
    All excellent advice. I worked hard at PT and at home, started riding on the trainer as soon as I could, made myself a wobble board, and I'm back riding on the road and hope to be ready to hit the trails by the end of the month, but only if the ankle feels strong and stable enough.
    The main head game that was holding me back was being discouraged at how far I still have to go to be back where I started, instead of looking at how far I've already come in a relatively short time. It took an astute physical therapist and a caring wife to shift my point of view on that.
    We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.

  10. #110
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    Well, it just keeps getting weirder and doesn't look like I'll be back on the mountain bike as soon I'd hoped. Went back to see the surgeon today because I've been having various pains a few inches below my knee and it really hurts if I squeeze the sides of my legs together up there. Turns out that it's very common to damage the upper fibula when the ankle is injured the way mine was. He said they assume that there will be some stress and/or damage up there, but unless it's a complete fracture and things are way out of line, they don't take any corrective measure and just let the fibula heal on it's out.
    An x-ray showed that I did have a break a few inches below the knee, but it's healing well and may give me some discomfort for a while longer. I was kind of relieved to find out that that's what's been causing the pain and that it's no big deal. The doc said careful road riding will be ok, but to stay off the trails until the ankle feels solid enough that if I have to put it down hard, it won't hurt. Basically once I can stamp my foot hard without pain I can hit the trails again.
    Damn, more delays...
    We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.

  11. #111
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    Ric... I am responding to your post last week... the reason I am posting is because you are describing a Maissoneuve Fracture... I sustained the same injury April 18 and had to have surgery where my ankle was pinned with two large screws. The upper fibula was broken just below the knee, but that was not an issue. If you "google" Massioneuve fracture you will see the classic broken fibula - blown out of busted ankle.

    I just had the screws taken out last week. I started physical therapy yesterday. I have been walking around without a cast or boot since last Wednesday. I am doing OK but have difficulty walking normally. I repeatedly ask the doctor if I can at least sit at a spin bike. The answer is "no" because the tendons and ligaments at the ankle take a really long time to heal. He wants me to wait another 4 weeks at least (he told me 6 mos total and apparently he means it. I wish I had your doctor - he allowed your return much quicker).

    So I have been off a bike since April 18; really no exercise at all. I've gained weight and lost alot of fitness. PT was difficult even though by olden day standards it was easy. Take it easy and follow docs advice. It is a very serious injury (lucky us) and if not properly healed, will cause problems later on. PS I am 64...

    Good luck on your healing... I just counting down the days to returning to some sort of bike...
    Nature Girl

  12. #112
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    Thanks for your concern, but I was lucky(?) in that I didn't tear the tibiofibular syndesmosis ligament, the fibular fracture was simple rather than spiral and damage to the interosseous membrane was minimal. Instead of tearing itself, the tibiofibular syndesmosis ligament tore the attachment point on the tibia off with a good chunk of the tibia and joint cartilage with it (an avulsion fracture). The doctor said that as long as he was careful to line up the cartilage properly, the two horizontal screws would hold the piece of tibia in place and it would heal much faster than if the ligament had torn. Because of the angle, the two horizontal screws look like they go through the distal end of the fibula, but they don't.
    I was able to start spinning without resistance on a wind trainer while I was still in the boot and while it wasn't weight bearing, it got the circulation going to reduce the swelling. Once I'd been through the PT and was able to put weight on my foot, he gave the ok to start road riding the beginning of August. He said the everything was healed enough that I can put as much pressure on the ankle as I can tolerate.
    My ankle was still tender at first and even bumps hurt, but the discomfort i was having at the fibula subsided within a few days of seeing the doctor, even though he didn't do anything to it. I decided my criteria for getting on the mountain bike again would be when the bumps didn't bother me and I was able to pedal standing. Between working hard on the home exercises and riding progressively harder on the road bike I was able to do three mountain bike rides last week and felt better with each one. I still need to gain a lot of muscle mass back, but I'm able to ride pretty comfortably now.
    It felt really good, both physically and mentally, to be able to mountain bike again, even at my current limited level. I figure that with riding however much of the season is left and enough gym work over the winter, I should be back to where I was before all the surgeries and the year off the bike.
    I hope your healing keeps progressing, and like you say, follow the docs advice.
    We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.

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