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  1. #1
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    IT Band Syndrome

    Been having problems with knee pain, finally had it checked out by a sports doctor and ITBS was his conclusion. I can still ride but hard efforts or out of the saddle efforts bring on discomfort and eventually sharp pain. Has anybody suffered through this? How long till you were healed to the point where you could do long hard effort rides? He recommended physio for me and to stay off the bike for a couple weeks. Most places online recommended 4-6 weeks to allow it to fully heal.

  2. #2
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    Hi, I had the same thing. The pain came on hard climbs and out of the saddle on the right side of my right knee. I had it checked out. They told me to back it off for a while and strengthen my hip muscles/flexors. The pain kept coming back even after lowering intensity and doing exercises/stretches. Your best bet is to totally stay off the bike for 2 weeks and stretch/roll that thing out. Go get a deep tissue massage and tell them you have IT band syndrome. They will work out the rigidity. It will hurt like hell but it is worth. Between that and the rest you should be ok in 2 weeks. Once you start riding again make sure to slowly get back into it. Start with at least a week of just spinning, no pushing. After that gradually work your way up to climbs and out of the saddle pedaling. Be very carefull; if you feel pain stop what you are doing and take a day off then start again. This isn't that serious of an injury but it can keep coming back for a long time if you don't take care of it now.

  3. #3
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    I hear ya on the reoccuring pain if it doesn't heal. Before I found out what I had I would stay off the bike for 4-5 days and think everything was good so i'd go out and hammer it, 2 hours into the ride the sharp pains/discomfort would show up, this was kind of repetitive for 3 weeks.
    I plan on keeping off the bike completely for 3-4 weeks just to make sure it heals up, then do a week or two of low intensity, I want to make sure it doesn't come back because it really puts a damper on racing.
    And I am definately going to get a massage, I hadn't even thought of that. Thanks for the input/advice.

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    I'm dealing with ITB syndrome currently also. I was prescribed some physical therapy but so far my schedule only allowed me to make the 1st appointment. I've been doing lots and lots of stretching and working on building my core strength up. I've actually noticed improvement when I ride more frequently as long as I don't push it too hard out of the saddle. I should also mention that I got a cortosone shot but that seemed to wear off after a week of improvement.
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  5. #5
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    Active Release Technique works wonders for ITB syndrome. My buddy was running in college, and told me he was out for 6 weeks because of it. We did three ART sessions, and it was gone and never came back. They have a website where you can find a practitioner. They are usually chiropractors.

    www.activerelease.com

  6. #6
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    I had it after a long (200K) road ride. It took about 2 months to get over it. During the first few days, I iced it a lot. I took Advil for a while to keep inflammation down. I took Glucosamine and fish oil for the next few months, and tried to not pedal hard. I backed off mileage some, but kept riding. Spin instead of mash up the hills. Also, lots of stretching.

  7. #7
    drinks from the fountain
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    Ugghh!

    I suffer every spring. Usually from riding too hard too fast. Dont go to the doc. See a good active physical therapist. Slow down and make sure you get enough magnesium,potassium,and calcium. (not synthetic) And last but not least active stretching.(yoga) This regimen works for me every time. Oh and dont over stretch if it hurts its too much.Good luck!
    pouring like an avalanche coming down the mountain

  8. #8
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    Get yourself a bottle of baby oil and give yourself some massages, really get down on the IT band with your knuckles and help to get them loosened up. I suffer tight IT bands also and this is what I do and my mas-sues does when I get a chance to get a massage (prefer massage to physio)

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by robbbby
    Been having problems with knee pain, finally had it checked out by a sports doctor and ITBS was his conclusion. I can still ride but hard efforts or out of the saddle efforts bring on discomfort and eventually sharp pain. Has anybody suffered through this? How long till you were healed to the point where you could do long hard effort rides? He recommended physio for me and to stay off the bike for a couple weeks. Most places online recommended 4-6 weeks to allow it to fully heal.

    Really?!?!? It have ITBS from my last 10k run and the GP and physio both told me to use the bike as part of my rehab because it doesn't irritate the ITB How bad is your ITBS? can you walk ?

  10. #10
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    I found stretching and yoga really helpful. I have to stretch the front of my hip most. If your IT is a problem don't keep aggravating it. Take time off and get it professionally taken care of or it will get worse not better and then you will be screwed.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by was98strat
    Really?!?!? It have ITBS from my last 10k run and the GP and physio both told me to use the bike as part of my rehab because it doesn't irritate the ITB How bad is your ITBS? can you walk ?
    I can walk just fine, it only gets bad if I do out of the saddle efforts or try and do seated spinning in a harder gear the requires more leg strength. This eventually brings on very sharp pains and I can't even walk up or down the stairs. I've found high cadence spinning doesn't really bother it much, it's only when I am really trying to push the gears.

  12. #12
    drinks from the fountain
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    cleats

    BTW check for worn cleats. Some cleats when worn out will let your foot rotate in or out effecting the IT.
    pouring like an avalanche coming down the mountain

  13. #13
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    suggestions

    I also suffered from it for a couple of years-on and off but have been pain free for the past two years. I would suggest these in order:

    1. see a fitter or someone knowledgable in body mechanics. my problem was i wasn't sitting squarely on the saddle. real simple but once I moved to neutral my pain instantly went away. check your saddle for more wear on one side as this is a good indicator.

    2. get a foam roller and follow the instructions on how to roll your legs and upper body. it's pretty simple and highly effective. lower leg (calves) seems to be overlooked by many.

    3. work on core conditioning. bicycling.com lays out a pretty comprehensive plan-it was in the mag a year or two ago. simple and highly effective.

    4. yoga, yoga, yoga. 1-3 days a week. find someone who rides that also teaches.

    Hope this helps.
    Brent

  14. #14
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  15. #15
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    Wow, I never expected this much feedback, thanks for all the tips/suggestions everyone.

    I am going to start stretching and doing what has been recommended. I'm also definately scheduling a massage or a ART session with a local chiropractor.

    I have to stare at my new bike everyday and tell her that we can't go riding, it's going to be hard.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlepito
    Active Release Technique works wonders for ITB syndrome. My buddy was running in college, and told me he was out for 6 weeks because of it. We did three ART sessions, and it was gone and never came back. They have a website where you can find a practitioner. They are usually chiropractors.

    www.activerelease.com
    Out of curiosity how long were you 'ART' sessions?

    I went to see a chiropractor yesterday (monday) for this ART, it cost me $60 and he spent maybe 5-6 minutes TOPS working on my leg. After working my leg he put those electrical muscle contracting tabs on me for 8 minutes and my session was done. Less then 15 minutes total. He also requested to see me two more times this week. Needless to say I felt a little ripped off. I almost feel like going to a good massage therapist and getting a full hour for my $60.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seanbike
    I'm dealing with ITB syndrome currently also. I was prescribed some physical therapy but so far my schedule only allowed me to make the 1st appointment. I've been doing lots and lots of stretching and working on building my core strength up. I've actually noticed improvement when I ride more frequently as long as I don't push it too hard out of the saddle. I should also mention that I got a cortosone shot but that seemed to wear off after a week of improvement.
    PT, stretching, chiropractor, deep tissue massage, and core strengthening are all good.

    Avoid cortisone shots, long term they tend to deteriorate the muscle/tendon. Short term they help some people more than others. Better to do the other more natural stuff listed above and make your whole body strong.
    Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life son...

  18. #18
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    ART sessions are short because the muscle work is very aggressive. Also the chiro is more expensive then a massage therapist for several reasons.

    1. malpractice
    2. a therapist is just that, a therapist. a chiro is a doctor for which he/she went to school for 8 years and spent over 100gs
    3.ART is an expensive tech to learn and requires re-certification every other year

    Stick with it, and don't miss the sessions. ART works best every other day. You may not see results with the first treatment. But trust me, for ITB it works the best. Also rotator cuff if anyone else is reading.

  19. #19
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    I have been suffering with this all summer long...but I initially got ITBS 10 years ago...it comes and goes. Have done PT on both knees while reducing time on the bike, given up running and hiking completely. During the PT sessions, we did stretching, hip flexor work, ultrasound and electro stim. It seems that if I keep up with the stretching, I can keep the ITBS pain at a minimum...however if it gets bad, I need to go back to PT for the ultrasound and electro stim. Just my 2 pence.

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