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  1. #1
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    Avascular Necrosis

    Just my luck, after fight UC for many years and finally having my colon removed...I am now looking at both hips getting replaced. Thanks to some heavy prednesone use as prescribed by my doctors the end of my femurs are dying. The only fix is a total hip replacement. I am still able to ride (but getting on the bike is hard) and will be able to ride as part of my recovery.

    Anyone else dealt with Avascular Necrosis
    Former bicycle mechanic for 8 years, current soil scientist.

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  2. #2
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    Not me, but I'm sorry you have to go through all this. Good luck.
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    You guys suck im all bummed now

  3. #3
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    I don't have any experience with AVN, but I had 2 Birmingham hip resurfacings (BHR) in 2009 when I was 56 and I am able to ride and do anything I want, no problem. THR is similar to BHR. You probably would not be a candidate for BHR because of your femurs. But I think with THR's you should be able to ride with some caution. The best advice I can give you is get the BEST SURGEON you can. This is critical, they are not all created equal. You want one with a proven track record of long term great results. Good luck

  4. #4
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    Well I have met with two surgeons and I am looking to have a bilateral replacement using the anterior method. This will cut down my total recovery time significantly. Looking at 4-6 weeks until I return to work! I think this is the best after doing my research. The bad news is he is scheduled out until late March. I am on the waiting list in case of a cancellation but it may be a while. I just want to get back to full riding by next summer.
    Former bicycle mechanic for 8 years, current soil scientist.

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  5. #5
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    Dude, seriously, both hips at same time..... Get second opinion.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by cptjack View Post
    Dude, seriously, both hips at same time..... Get second opinion.
    What makes you think having both replaced is bad? I have had two opinions, one doing one at a time posterior which will involve 6-8 weeks recovery EACH and the second opinion of having them done anterior which would allow me to have both done at the same time with a 4-6 week average recovery. I have good bone density and good muscle structure and am a good candidate for this surgery.

    Can you provide some valuable insight or do you actually not know
    Former bicycle mechanic for 8 years, current soil scientist.

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  7. #7
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    Risk of infection

    Doing both at the same time could be really serious if you get an infection. Both will have it. That being said I would have risked it by having both knees replaced at once, rather than going through it twice.

  8. #8
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    Getting Titanium replacements with Ceramic heads (bearing). Wish my bike was Titanium with ceramic bearings!

    Surgery in ~16 hours
    Former bicycle mechanic for 8 years, current soil scientist.

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  9. #9
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    Gross, I have had knee surgery and it sucks.

    I hope all goes well for you and you heal super fast and are riding before you know it!

  10. #10
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    AVN is bad news. It does not get better and surgery is the only option. A double hip is going to create a difficult early recovery due to the need to be assisted with transfers to and from bed and chairs etc, plus due to the discomfort on both sides. Make sure you add another mattress to your bed to make getting in and out easier. All the best for your op.

  11. #11
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    Surgery always comes with a risk of infection, why do it separately and double the risk? More to the point, you'd just want to get it over with than drag the whole thing out. Well, I would anyway

  12. #12
    FKA Malibu412
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bike Whisperer View Post
    Surgery in ~16 hours
    Today was the day. Hope it went very well for you, Aaron, and your recovery is complete with no complications.
    Everything that kills me, makes me feel alive

  13. #13
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    I've had surgery on both hips in last 18 months and 12 wks on crutches. (labrum repair right hip, femoral neck fracture left hip, no AVN so far) Get forearm crutches, not the stupid armpit crutches. Wrap the handles with two layers of road bike bar wrap on day one.
    Oh sh!+ just force upgraded to cat1. Now what?
    Best thing about an ultra marathon? I just get to ride my bike for X hours!

  14. #14
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    Surgery was successful, both hips replaced with no complications. Now it's time to recover and be ready to ride by Spring!
    Former bicycle mechanic for 8 years, current soil scientist.

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  15. #15
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    congratulations. I agree with your decision to do both and an additional reason is to avoid asymmetric recovery where you favor one side and the muscles get stronger on the good side and atrophy on the weak side and you spend months being pulled out of alignment. Best of luck on your recovery.

  16. #16
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    Great couple of days on Phil's Trails

    The guy who took the picture thought I was "hardcore" for riding a full rigid...I didn't mention my permanent ileostomy and the double hip replacement in late January.

    Avascular Necrosis-10308909_10152082583812966_1957824124557977378_n.jpg
    Former bicycle mechanic for 8 years, current soil scientist.

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  17. #17
    FKA Malibu412
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    Aaron, you're an Iron Man! Glad to see your recovery is going well.
    Everything that kills me, makes me feel alive

  18. #18
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    I would seriously consider full suspension from here on in if bike riding longevity is important to you. Allowing your body to take the shocks directly is the worst thing you could be doing for your hand. Let suspension take the brunt, I beg you.

    I even sold my 26" mtb's to pay for a 160mm longer travel bike with 650b wheels. I am far less beaten up now.
    Last edited by lucifuge; 05-04-2014 at 03:27 PM.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by lucifuge View Post
    I would seriously consider full suspension from here on in if bike riding longevity is important to you. Allowing your body to take the shocks directly is the worst thing you could be doing for your hand. Let suspension take the brunt, I beg you.

    I even sold my 26" mtb's to pay for a 160mm longer travel bike with 650b wheels. I am far less beaten up now.
    I disagree, for the trails I ride a full suspension is nothing more than a crutch for unskilled riders.

    Riding a rigid requires you to slow down, pick your lines, be skilled. Having owned full suspensions from 2001 to 2012, all they did was allow me to ride faster, jump higher, pick bad lines, and crash harder. I've been riding for over 20 years and I don't jump anymore, I don't ride black diamond trails, and I ride with skill and precision.

    The 29 x 2.3" big volume tubeless tires at 18 psi provides me enough to absorb the small impacts. The rest is using skill and the "green" and "blue" trails at Phil's Trails Complex are easily rode on a rigid.
    Former bicycle mechanic for 8 years, current soil scientist.

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  20. #20
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    glad you are doing better, man. I read the first post and got bummed out, but happy to see you're doing so well.

  21. #21
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    Hell yeah, man! I recently broke my Humerus really badly and until seeing this, was feeling sorry for myself..you're carved out of granite, man!

  22. #22
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    What causes AVN?

  23. #23
    Cheesiest
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    Bada$$!
    "Paved roads...just another example of needless government spending"—paraphrased from rhino_adv

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