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  1. #1
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    any one here have Osgood-Schlatter disease

    how do you deal with it, after a long hard ride 3-4 hours my knee will be sore for 1-2 days, icing and heating it dose help a little, but the other day i went down in a rock garden smashed my knee and holly god did that hurt, my friend thought i broke my leg from the amout of cursing and yelling, i don't think too many people know just how bad a good bump to the knee can hurt someone with Osgood-Schlatter disease,

  2. #2
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    I was diagnosed with it by my family doctor when I about 10 yrs old. It kept me out of participating in a few sports, but I kept riding my BMX bike and then freestyled in the 80's. Been riding MTB few a couple of years now. My knees still get sore, but I try not to overdo it. A lot of climbing really seems to make them hurt more. I'm 37 now and I just try to take it easy.

    I think most people who are diagnosed with it when they are young grow out of it and may develop a bump below the knee. I have them but it doesn't bother me much. I used to worry about screwing up my knees alot, but most of my injuries haven't had anything to with them. Good luck!

    There are a few threads at the Crossfit site that talks about it. Here is a link to one: http://board.crossfit.com/showthread...ghlight=osgood

  3. #3
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    same here i was diagnosed when i was young (7-8 years old) and the doc said i would grow out of it, unlike the OP on the link you posted i was told it is inoperable, and here i am 25 now, it dosn't hurt on a daily basis but if i hit it O BOY !!! yea i have a decent bump below my knee as well i just tell people it's my second knee cap and look surprised when they say "that isn't normal"
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  4. #4
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    Mine was diagnosed in both knees when I was 12 - big lump on the right knee, smaller one on my left. I played soccer, raced MX, skied, etc. There were days I could barely walk - especially at the change over from one sport to another. It sucks, it's a pain deep in the knee, and another thing to bump when you fall. But - it also hurts enough to get you to cry like a little girl if you clap a normal knee cap into a rock garden.

    Short of complete knee replacement it is inoperable. Avoid taking massive doses of aspirin/Ibu, etc. This just covers up the pain - the wear and tear is still there. Take a look at glucosamene (sp) suppliments. Nightly icing - 20 on, 20 off for an hour - frozen peas and corn work the best. MARK THE BAGS YOU USE FOR THIS - trust me nothing tastes worse then vegetables that has been thawed and frozen a few dozen times.

    You will grow through this. Depending on the shape of your knee - take a look at some of the neoprene braces with a felt horseshoe under the knee cap - I wore one on my right knee all through high school. I had the hinged braces for a while but found my knees got worse with them. Keeping the leg muscles in as good a shape as possible helps quite a bit - as for your knees aching on rides - raise your seat until you are just barely bending your knee at the bottom of the stroke. Good luck...

  5. #5
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    i free ride and DH more than xc so a high seatpost just dosn't work, a nother thing that dosn't work for me is pain killers, i could OD on morphiene pills and fall over dead before the pain went away, vicks helps a little so dose ice and a hot towell, as for crying like a little girl, no, with me it's a lot of swearing yelling and punching things that usually don't move or break, it just sucks because all i want to do is ride, if i had a choice i would be on the trails 4-5 hours a day every day, but i think i'm going to limit my riding to twice a week,
    live life like a bullet
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  6. #6
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    I was diagnosed with OSD of the left knee when I about 12 yrs old. Kept me out of contact sports throughout high school. Couldn't handle the pain, nor being sidelined anymore so I discussed surgical options with my doctor in grade 12.

    Right after the summer of my graduation I chose to have surgery to remove the raised area of the tibial tuberosity. It took about 6 week of rehab and about another 6 weeks of strengthening. I'd say I was at 90% strength(no tenderness) in 4 months and 100% in about 8 months(April).

    For me it was the best thing I ever did for my OSD. To this day you can hit me below my knee and I feel no pain, no bump, nothing but a little scar. Kneeling, jumping, climbing, kicking... no pain. It's actually the stronger of the two knees.

    Anyways, that's my experience and I'm proud to say OSD is no longer a part of my life

  7. #7
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    chris68 when you went in did the doctor say anything about any risk involved with the surgery ? i think i'm going to look in to it, i would gladly sacrifice 6-7 months of riding to fix my knee,
    were there any side affects ? you got my hopes up
    live life like a bullet
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  8. #8
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    Wrong

    Quote Originally Posted by SSearchVT

    Short of complete knee replacement it is inoperable.

    Osgood Schlatter is a self-limited apophysitis of the tibial tubercle. It involves kids from 10-14 (girls younger, guys older), but almost always resolves by high school because the apophysis closes. The tibial tubercle is not in the knee joint. So, when we do knee replacements, the tubercle is not replaced. So, a total knee replacement will do nothing for Osgood Schlatter. If you are into adulthood and still having anterior knee pain, there is a good chance it is from patellar tendonitis or patellofemoral symptoms. Osgood Schlatter symptoms in your 20's are rare.
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  9. #9
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    Sadly I also got it around 10 yrs old. I still played net (hockey) and all other sports through the pain. Never went away,3/4 size of a golf ball.
    To this day as someone else stated, I still want to cry like a little girl when I hit those bumps.

    Feels better taking pucks off the bare face,then hitting that bump.

    Good Luck

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by splattered
    chris68 when you went in did the doctor say anything about any risk involved with the surgery ? i think i'm going to look in to it, i would gladly sacrifice 6-7 months of riding to fix my knee,
    were there any side affects ? you got my hopes up
    Docs quote, "there is always risks involving surgery" and that's why it's always the last option. As for specifics, the surgery was 20 years ago and all I recall was that there nothing but positive dialog from the surgeon. I'm sure that in 20 years the procedure may have advanced, but it worked for me then

    The only side affect, if you can call it that, was losing strength in my quad muscle from the procedure. From memory, I was on crutches for about a week. Physio twice a week for a month, then once a week for about a month thereafter. Then it was just strengthening of the quad muscle, which happens more quickly the more active you are.


    Talk to your doctor/surgeon and let us all know how things go.

  11. #11
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    I was diagnosed with it in high school. I had it in both my knees, and was told there was not much that could be done. I played soccer, and was in constant pain whenever I would run. Ice helped a bit, but not much.

    It pretty much went away after high school, but now I have two good sized lumps below my knees that hurt like hell when they are bumped. Glad to know I'm not the only one, as I thought I was just overly sensitive.
    "There's right and there's right and never the twain shall meet" H.I. McDonnough

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