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  1. #1
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    New question here. Any iliotibial (IT) Band Syndrome sufferers out there?

    Hey Everyone,

    Any IT Band Syndrome sufferers out there?
    Just wondering what others have done to deal with this curse.

    I've been trying to reading as much as possible on the subject and have read conflicting information on the effectiveness of IT Band stretching to help prevent it.
    Some say it is too large of a tendon to stretch properly.

    Any first hand experiences would help greatly.

    I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me.
    Hunter S. Thompson

  2. #2
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    I was off of the bike for 2 months last summer with IT issues. I traced it to a low saddle height and narrow q-factor on my road bike. I could ride the mtb without pain but it would come right back on the road bike. I raised the saddle and set the pedals out 10mm to get them closer to the mtb setup. I've been racing and training for the past 3 or 4 months without issue and I'm stronger than I was before the pain. I found that time off the bike was the only cure.

  3. #3
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    I was having terrible pain and went to an Ortho surgeon to get checked out but he recommended stretches. The stretches are tough and take time but they work if you make the effort. They are the hardest ones to do but daily stretches has made me relatively pain-free.

    One most people do not know about is simply sitting cross-legged (as in a Yoga position). When in that position take the painful leg and put that foot over the other thigh. Pull the foot up higher till you feel the stretch and leave for a minute. You can also lean forward to stretch the hip.

    There is no denying that these stretches just suck but they do work. Also, there is one that folds your leg below your abs. I do this on the stairs (I put the folded leg up on stair 3 or 4) to get a better stretch- also works and also freaking painful. It gets the leg/hips to stretch more though.

  4. #4
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    Yep, got some here too. Bike fit is huge, as is daily stretching. I also use 'the stick' to self-massage and that tends to calm down bigger flare-ups, but really the biggest thing is to rest. You cant force this one into submission, once it is irritated, it just takes time to calm it back down. Mine happened because I tried to increase my running distance too fast, and apparently my right heel should have a wedge under it because of alignment issues from an ankle break that was several years ago. My PT also recommended deep-tissue massage which hurts like hell but seems to work out the toughest knots. Good luck.

  5. #5
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    The best way to find out the cause would be to see a Physical Therapist. But the easiest DIY way is to find a foam roller. It is painful and torturous but effective. Here is a web link from a goog search I performed: "foam roller for ITB"

  6. #6
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    Oops did not include link: http://www.youcanbefit.com/ROLLER.pdf

  7. #7
    Forgiven
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    I'm finding that a great stretch is one where I start by laying flat on my back, with knees bent and feet flat on the floor. From there I cross my legs so the back of my right calf would rest on the outside of my left knee and vise-versa. Then 'drop' or 'push' or 'rest' the top leg down toward the floor stretching the opposing IT band. Both legs fall to the side. You'll feel this in your low back if it's tight too. As your back loosens up you'll feel it in your IT band. I tend to feel it quite a bit in my low back when my legs are 'falling' to the right, and right away in my right IT when my legs fall to the left. An inbalance I am working through. I hope this helps without having a picture to show. During recent PT I learned this one and it has helped a lot. I use a roller also. The thing friggin' hurts but works.

  8. #8
    endorphin addict
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    Kneesavers

    www.bikescor.com/product/knee.htm

    I do stretches and I've been using these for the past year or so between my pedals and the crank arm -- without them I don't think I would have been able to stay on the bike. They're 20mm each, so a little wide stance for some people, but like I said they work for me. Better than not riding for sure.

  9. #9
    meh... whatever
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    some info and stretches here
    "The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away."

  10. #10
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    Thanks for the replies everyone.

    I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me.
    Hunter S. Thompson

  11. #11
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    Stretching it with a foam roller helps...but it is really painful.

    I dealt with IT band issues during my first triathlon season.

    Frequent stretching and running on even terrain minimized the occurence.
    -ROXY

  12. #12
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    thanks again for all the replies.

    I was wondering if anyone had a good source for information on proper Mountain Bike fitting. I'd prefer something free online if possible.

    I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me.
    Hunter S. Thompson

  13. #13
    meh... whatever
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    Quote Originally Posted by PUBCRAWL
    thanks again for all the replies.

    I was wondering if anyone had a good source for information on proper Mountain Bike fitting. I'd prefer something free online if possible.
    you can do basic bit fitting yourself or with the help of a friend. but for a more comprehensive fit you MUST have a professional fit you.

    here and here great articles on the basics of bike fit. if you ride a double boinger it makes seat height fit a little trickier.

    there are also a few books you can get which will help you to understand bike fit and the biomechanical, physiological, and kinesiological aspects of cycling, injury prevention/recovery, and training much better.

    they are this one, this one, and this one.

    if you can only get one, get dr. pruitt's medical guide to cycling.
    "The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away."

  14. #14
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    foam roller, stretching and if it gets bad...PT for electro stim and ultrasound. It just takes time off the bike. Generally.....daily stretching and roller keep it at bay except for the big rides...then I just have to take a few days off and stretch like theres no tomorrow.

  15. #15
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    Try this it works:

    http://www.thestick.com/

  16. #16
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    I just switched to Time ATAC's pedals vs. the SPD's....I have not had IT pain since then....and it was a chronic problem previously! Seriously, buy them....wish I had done so earlier because the foam roller and stretching just makes things manageable. The difference is night and day.

  17. #17
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    On the foam roller, it is painful at first, but after you get used to it not so bad. Found the foam roller much.... better than the stick.

  18. #18
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    I use these stretches, and also do some specific exercises to strengthen my inner thigh muscles (plies are good...a ballet move).

    http://www.howtostretch.com/iliotibi.htm

  19. #19
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    What everyone has posted is good. I was a 100m sprinter (track and field) in college and had tight IT bands. I had a "new" procedure done by a Doctor in Ft. Myers, FL (where I used to live) that was called IT Band Release. He cut slits into the upper portion of each IT Band, when then caused them to release and lengthen. I was the first person that he did both legs at the same time. It helped a great deal, but unfortunately I was lazy and didn't stick with the necessary stretching. Here 8 years later I don't have any pain but they have tightened up a bit. I do try to stretch before and after riding and working out, because I don't want to have that problem again.

    But otherwise, just get the foam roller (a good one) and you should see a big difference in that.

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