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  1. #1
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    Moncog, what fun!!!!!!!

    My first ride on my new 2011 26er small monocog. New trail, new ride. What a kick, I just loved it. It needs peddles, maybe I'll finaly have the balls to try clipless, I think I can be attached to this bike.

  2. #2
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    i have a 2010 26" monocog. when i got it, i swapped out the headset immediately and upgraded to some disc brakes. other than that, I have changed a lot of the parts just for weight savings. everything on the bike as-is was pretty solid, albeit heavy. the rear hub accepts any Shimano-style single-speed cog, which can be purchased cheap, so buy a few cogs 16t-22t and find out which works best for you. I have found that I can climb just about anything with a 32/20 gear, but it's really slow on flats. 32/16 is a lot faster on any trail, but i have to walk a lot of climbs. 32/18 seems to be the perfect compromise, fast, but I can grind my way through most climbs. my bike came with a 33t ring, so pick your cogs accordingly.

    go clipless! get some pedals that have adjustable tension and start with them really loose to get used to it, them tighten them up a little as you get used to them.

    The Pedro's Trixie tool is handy have have with a Monocog too. the lock ring wrench works on the rear hub and the 15mm socket is great for the axle nuts. you can loosen the lock ring and swap the cog by using the lockring wrench on the hub while the wheel is still on the bike. then loosen the axle nuts and pull the wheel off to remove and replace the cog.

  3. #3
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    OK thanks. How much lighter can it get? It must already be 5 or 6 Lbs. lighter than my Diamondback response comp. I think that's why I've been having such a blast.

  4. #4
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    the frame and fork are pretty heavy, as are the rims. if you know how to build wheels, you can lace them up to something like Mavic 717's and shave a ton of rotational weight off the bike, which you will feel. light tires might help too, but at the expense of traction. I put a Surly 1x1 fork on it and took off quite a bit of weight.

    or course switching everything you can to a carbon alternative will save a lot, but at a premium price. the frame weighs over 6 pounds (I checked), so there's no point in doing that. start with the rims and maybe the bars, although those bars are pretty darn nice.

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