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  1. #1
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    Reasons why say NO on a DROPPER SEATPOST

    What are your reasons why you are hesitant to join the band wagon? I am selling my KS post at a very low price to my friend as its already having problems so I am now thinking if I should go back to a fixed post or try the REVERB? Any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    Biking is what I do to get away from the problems not create more. Still waiting for someone to get it right, they're getting closer I think. I've ridden many years without one I can wait another one if I have to.

  3. #3
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    KS had a bad run of seals - out of tolerance. Got mine fixed at the beginning of the year and can't imagine riding without. Used to think like dumbass but now I realize how much time I wasted by waiting - improves my enjoyment of the sport that much!

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  4. #4
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    So both of you guys cant live without a dropper post uh?I am trying to decide to settle on a fixed post or spend on a post that does not know when it will explode =)

  5. #5
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    I don't have one.

    Don't wanna take the time to order it
    I can raise and lower my seat while i'm riding with my salsa clamp
    dislike of complexity/too many failures/fear of seat getting stuck down
    ignorance is bliss
    added weight


    I'll probably own one eventually, but now is not the time.
    I like cheap stuff that works great and is very sturdy.

  6. #6
    the giant.
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    when i bought my new frame used the guy included a ks dropper post. love it. so much easier to transition from ups to downs and have room for the "goods."

    granted, i would never buy one new. ide rather raise/lower my seat by hand instead of spending $200+ on a seatpost. but if you can get one for minimal cost, go for it!

  7. #7
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    *sigh* Get a Gravity Dropper and run it for years without issue. No oil. No air spring. Full mechanical function, great support. It's ugly. Get over it.

    If you want pretty, you get issues too. (sounds like life )

    In a couple of years the air and oil droppers will get their issues sorted, but life is to short not to get low and pin that turn/huck that jump/soak up that drop.

    P

  8. #8
    nocturnal oblivion
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.P View Post
    *sigh* Get a Gravity Dropper and run it for years without issue. No oil. No air spring. Full mechanical function, great support. It's ugly. Get over it.

    If you want pretty, you get issues too. (sounds like life )

    In a couple of years the air and oil droppers will get their issues sorted, but life is to short not to get low and pin that turn/huck that jump/soak up that drop.

    P
    Exactly. Tried and true design. Takes under a minute to give a regular service when needed. It's not going to win any awards for looks, but my bike isn't entering any fashion contests either.
    "...like sex with the trail." - Boe

  9. #9
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    so... is this the 'reasons why say NO on a DROPPER SEATPOST so we can tell you you're wrong and to spend more money on bike knicknacks' thread?

    I vote for a moratorium on posts to that effect.
    I like cheap stuff that works great and is very sturdy.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by LGavin View Post
    What are your reasons why you are hesitant to join the band wagon? I am selling my KS post at a very low price to my friend as its already having problems so I am now thinking if I should go back to a fixed post or try the REVERB? Any thoughts?
    I have two KS posts. I put up with the added weight and maintenance. I can't imagine riding without one

  11. #11
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    My KS has a sagging issue and i think even if you have rebuilt it it will happen again and again like every after 4 rides. That's the reason why I am getting rid of it already and might try a REVERB or just a fixed post.

  12. #12
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    I had a GD for a while. Brilliant piece of hardware. I sold it to save over 1/2 lb and regret it like a mofo. I'd give my left nut to get another one.
    I get my boards at Lux-RC.com

  13. #13
    the giant.
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    Quote Originally Posted by LGavin View Post
    My KS has a sagging issue and i think even if you have rebuilt it it will happen again and again like every after 4 rides. That's the reason why I am getting rid of it already and might try a REVERB or just a fixed post.
    some of the ks posts are suspension posts as well. the "sag" is the suspension at work. i have the ks i850 and this happens if im not completely on the back of the saddle. it takes getting used to, but i dont mind it on my HT

  14. #14
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    Cost and weight for me. I like taking my time on rides, and most of my rides are all up then all down so i don't change my seatpost height more than two to four times in a ride.

  15. #15
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    For those who say they there's no point in dropping your post during a climb, obviously climb on fire roads or carpet'd singletracks, because I set up my dropper to have the saddle at the most optimal height for pedaling efficiency. But the reality is the most optimal height is entirely too high for techy climbs.

    Question: for those of you who use a dropper, how many times a minute do you think you tweak your saddle height, even during a climb? When I last paid attention, it was at least twice. I have it on my left hand and I'm on it as much as shifting w/ my right hand.
    Naysayers never apologize. Critics go to their grave thinking everyone else is wrong.
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  16. #16
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    I think they're a great idea, and no doubt improve your ride when they're working and not bothering you with shake/wobble etc, but it seems to me that they're still a generation or two away from being sufficiently reliable that I'd bother getting one.

  17. #17
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    I can't live without mine. I just treat them like any other disposable piece on my bike.... like tires, chains, chain rings, cassettes, brake pads, derailleurs, etc. They're too expensive and they wear out and you have to replace them...... but you gotta have them. What you gonna do?

    I have three (four if you count my old clapped out Maverick Speedball). The only one that hasn't had a problem yet is the KS 950i. I rotate them as they need attention or need replacing. Sure, I wish they were more problem free and lasted longer.... but I'm not going to stop using them.
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrantR View Post
    Cost and weight for me. I like taking my time on rides, and most of my rides are all up then all down so i don't change my seatpost height more than two to four times in a ride.
    I can understand that

    Seat down is all that really seems to matter.

    P

  19. #19
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    well i cant see the point is having a device to change the seat up and down

    also more to go wrong wouldn't have to worry about seat failing then being too low on the seat to get power

    i suppose it like remote lockout you either love it or hate it

  20. #20
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    the 2012 rockshox reverb I think will be more reliable than any other older dropper seatpost brands.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.P View Post
    *sigh* Get a Gravity Dropper and run it for years without issue. No oil. No air spring. Full mechanical function, great support. It's ugly. Get over it.

    If you want pretty, you get issues too. (sounds like life )

    In a couple of years the air and oil droppers will get their issues sorted, but life is to short not to get low and pin that turn/huck that jump/soak up that drop.

    P
    +1

    Love my GD and have had no issues since I first got it. It was sticking a little so I paid $20 to have the local shop service it and now it works better then when I first got it. Just needed some grease.

  22. #22
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    I want one!.... I think?

    been wanting one and have the money all saved up, but just cant decide

    1)add @ 500+gms (yes, i do visit ww forum often)
    2)add another cable and lever to bar(jealous of single speed simplicity)
    3) possible failure of dropper (least of my concerns really but still factor)
    OR

    1)get lower for tech stuff,climbing and decending
    2)get even lower for the stuff that really scares me
    3) get alittle higher for the steep & smooth ( on most tech trails i have saddle a little lower than the optimal height for climbing efficiently)

    so i just keep waiting,wondering, reading threads like this

    BTW...Aren Timmel won this years TS100 with a dropper post! actually he smashed the coarse! so, i think i am going to get one!
    .......I think...
    .....the end

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post
    For those who say they there's no point in dropping your post during a climb, obviously climb on fire roads or carpet'd singletracks, because I set up my dropper to have the saddle at the most optimal height for pedaling efficiency. But the reality is the most optimal height is entirely too high for techy climbs.

    Question: for those of you who use a dropper, how many times a minute do you think you tweak your saddle height, even during a climb? When I last paid attention, it was at least twice. I have it on my left hand and I'm on it as much as shifting w/ my right hand.
    I have a KS and totally agree - I waste so much headspace wondering if I should raise or lower constantly. Solid post still has charm a d forces you to focus on what's important - riding your bike.

  24. #24
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    Five seasons on a Classic Gravity Post and still going strong,why anyone would go with any other brand is beyond me,have seen friends break,have mechanical issues on other major brands and now all run the Gravity.

  25. #25
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    When I go geAred, I will run out and buy a GD post. In the meantime, I stand to climb and to descend on my SS, so the need just isn't there for me. I'm sure they are a transformative bauble and all.
    Responds to gravity

  26. #26
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    If the trails you ride most don't involve any steep downhills, you don't need one. If they involve a long climb followed by a long descent, you don't need one. If you enjoy having the seat all up in your junk when descending steep stuff, you don't need one.

    Our trails have many short, steep ups and downs which makes a dropper post useful. I prefer having the seat low when descending on my trail bike (got used to it riding DH) even though I can manage most stuff with the seat up. It's just more fun with it lower. I use my dropper post dozens of times on a typical ride. YMMV.

    I've been using an AMP since 2009 with no issues so far. Too bad Precision Cycling Components seems to have dropped off the map.

  27. #27
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    There are only two reasons not to run a Gravity Dropper. 1 - you cant afford one or 2 - you only ever ride on flat ground. Personally, I think they are the single best upgrade for mountain bikes since the suspension forks and disk brakes and will never again own a mountain bike without one.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhinofly View Post
    There are only two reasons not to run a Gravity Dropper. 1 - you cant afford one or 2 - you only ever ride on flat ground. Personally, I think they are the single best upgrade for mountain bikes since the suspension forks and disk brakes and will never again own a mountain bike without one.
    Bingo!!

    The only mountain bike I will own without one is my pure endurance racing machine as that has to be the lightest bike there, and we don't do that much technical stuff in 100 mile races.

    The Gravity Dropper is a good alternative for those worried about seals and hydraulic stuff. If that thing fails, it will also fail up, rather then down, and they have a great warranty.

    -Tom

  29. #29
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    I want one, but I don't need one, because I don't race, and have coil front and rear because I ride a lot so I have enough weight already. If I hear consistent reports that they last at least for a few years I'll be in.

  30. #30
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    (1) if you have to use credit to buy one
    (2) if you don't ride technical terrain where there's a great benefit in raising and lowering the seat
    (3) if you can't deal with imperfect designs. All of them have issues still, at least over a large population.

    I had a Gravity Dropper and it was okay but finicky and I didn't like the fixed positions. Sold it and bought a KS and love the KS but it does stick some. However, it has been great over several thousand miles of trail riding with an average of about 15-25 seat cycles per hour.

  31. #31
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    I have a Reverb on my bike but hardly ever use it. I do ride a lot of technical climbs and descents, but after 10 years of BMX riding with my saddle high (80's) and 25 years or MTB of riding my saddle high (never ran a QR) it feels very strange to have the seat lower. All of my friends ride them and wonder why I never use it, but I can move around on my bike just fine without it. No problem getting behind the seat during sketchy descent or drops.

    I am trying to remember to use it, but even then I only drop it an inch or so. Not sure it is worth the complexity and weight. I have had it stick down after a fitting was cracked and air got in the system. Other than that the Reverb has been problem free.

  32. #32
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    If they made a 7" drop I'd have one.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by foot hill View Post
    been wanting one and have the money all saved up, but just cant decide

    1)add @ 500+gms (yes, i do visit ww forum often)
    2)add another cable and lever to bar(jealous of single speed simplicity)
    3) possible failure of dropper (least of my concerns really but still factor)
    OR

    1)get lower for tech stuff,climbing and decending
    2)get even lower for the stuff that really scares me
    3) get alittle higher for the steep & smooth ( on most tech trails i have saddle a little lower than the optimal height for climbing efficiently)

    so i just keep waiting,wondering, reading threads like this

    BTW...Aren Timmel won this years TS100 with a dropper post! actually he smashed the coarse! so, i think i am going to get one!
    .......I think...
    Your facts are in order (though the GD Turbo is something like 500g total, not 500g gain over a fixed post). I just got the Turbo and like you have always run my seat at less than optimal for climbing. Now with the full height/1 inch drop/full drop it's a world of difference. I run my seat all the way up, drop it 1 inch for techy climbs, then drop it for going down. It's a blast. Picked up the Turbo with an extra different height inner post for $180 used btw. Figure out what length and drop you want so you can start browsing the classifieds now, it's tough to find the right used one.
    "...like sex with the trail." - Boe

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by keen View Post
    If they made a 7" drop I'd have one.
    Must be my newb status and how much seatpost room there is on my Blur LT2 frame, but I actually wouldn't mind going from the 125mm Reverb to a 100mm post. I couldn't imagine requiring a 170-180mm dropper post.

  35. #35
    Trailhead Poseur
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    I live in Florida, we have no mountains here.

  36. #36
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    I won't build another bike without one, but I ride really rocky and technical trails.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjaguar View Post
    I live in Florida, we have no mountains here.
    This is the biggest reason to get a dropper, IMO. When you live in a place where you slog your way to the top for a couple hrs, then you can drop your rigid post via QR and enjoy the DH for a long freakin' time.

    When you live in a relatively flat place with punchy climbs...you need to raise and lower all the time. The dropper is excellent for this.
    I get my boards at Lux-RC.com

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by L. Ron Hoover View Post
    If the trails you ride most don't involve any steep downhills, you don't need one. If they involve a long climb followed by a long descent, you don't need one. If you enjoy having the seat all up in your junk when descending steep stuff, you don't need one.

    Our trails have many short, steep ups and downs which makes a dropper post useful. I prefer having the seat low when descending on my trail bike (got used to it riding DH) even though I can manage most stuff with the seat up. It's just more fun with it lower. I use my dropper post dozens of times on a typical ride. YMMV.

    I've been using an AMP since 2009 with no issues so far. Too bad Precision Cycling Components seems to have dropped off the map.
    +1

    It's a huge confidence builder in ledgy areas like where I live. It allows you to get a low center of gravity, yet stay centered over the bike, instead of hanging your ass off the back. That way you maintain a MUCH more athletic position in steep, sketchy areas.

    KS makes a great product, but they are not maintenance free...IMHO.

  39. #39
    AFI
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    Want one, but waiting for the Fox D.O.S.S.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by LGavin View Post
    My KS has a sagging issue and i think even if you have rebuilt it it will happen again and again like every after 4 rides. That's the reason why I am getting rid of it already and might try a REVERB or just a fixed post.
    I have one KS that has been flawless with 9 months of use in the PNW muck.

    I've got another one that I just got and it does the "sagging" thing you refer to. I've contacted Rick at KS and he told me to send it in and he'll fix it. I'm literally doing that today.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    When you live in a relatively flat place with punchy climbs...you need to raise and lower all the time. The dropper is excellent for this.
    Oh yeah, we have a punchy climb. I forgot about it.

  42. #42
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    Dropper posts are great for descending as described already but I find them just as important for cornering and pumping terrain. People get all hung up about the cornering improvements of a lower BB with the post out of the way you can lower your COG 4-5. How many people ride a pump track with a seat up their bum? You cant work the contours and nuances of the trail with the saddle at full height. Adjustable posts are as important as disc brakes and suspension forks for me.

    Gravity Dropper brand posts are simple and dependable, Ive tried others and always come back to the original.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    All of my friends ride them and wonder why I never use it, but I can move around on my bike just fine without it. No problem getting behind the seat during sketchy descent or drops.
    I am always amazed when people say things like this. Moving around just fine needs examination. "Moving around just fine" vs. piloting a bike to it's potential are drastically different. I'd say moving around fine is moving very poorly and not fine at all. I can't figure out why there are so many people who limit themselves to such a huge degree. Getting behind the saddle is great example of just how bad it is to ride with a high saddle. What must one do to get behind a saddle? How about to get back on/above/or in-front of the saddle?Do these movements and timings associated with positioning behind a saddle allow the bike to dictate fore/aft riding position? (rhetorical - they don't)

    I'm not saying someone who rides with a high saddle it is a poor rider, I'm saying someone who does it is riding poorly.

    A really good argument for dropper posts is reduce the number of people riding poorly.
    Try riding a pump track with a high saddle.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Endomaniac View Post
    Dropper posts are great for descending as described already but I find them just as important for cornering and pumping terrain. People get all hung up about the cornering improvements of a lower BB with the post out of the way you can lower your COG 4-5. How many people ride a pump track with a seat up their bum? You cant work the contours and nuances of the trail with the saddle at full height. Adjustable posts are as important as disc brakes and suspension forks for me.

    Gravity Dropper brand posts are simple and dependable, Ive tried others and always come back to the original.
    Exactly my point! Only more eloquent.


  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Endomaniac View Post
    Dropper posts are great for descending as described already but I find them just as important for cornering and pumping terrain. People get all hung up about the cornering improvements of a lower BB with the post out of the way you can lower your COG 4-5. How many people ride a pump track with a seat up their bum? You cant work the contours and nuances of the trail with the saddle at full height. Adjustable posts are as important as disc brakes and suspension forks for me.

    Gravity Dropper brand posts are simple and dependable, Ive tried others and always come back to the original.
    Am I wrong or couldn't you just loosen your seat QR at the pump track then raise it when you leave? How much is an extra 1/2 to 1 lb placed really high on your bike that requires extra maintenance, extra stuff on your handlebar and extra dollars really worth? More than a $20qr and how much more?

    Since the days of the Repack people have been riding their bikes without remotes. Sure there was the hiterite which worked well cost little and weighed nothing but that went away during the era of all things lighter. Now someone has made a better mousetrap and everyone is scrambling to get them.

    All I hear is how they fail, how they wobble, rock back and forth, how it is hard to get the cable to look good on the cage and how expensive they are and what the next model will be that fixes all these problems. Been hearing that since the first Maverick Speedball came out.

    I have a seat post i bought in 1990, I am still using it, it still works. I lower it by hand at the top of super tech rides because I am not racing and can wait 10 seconds that it takes to get off, adjust my bike and then remount. I can raise it at the bottom because again I am not in a race, sometimes i stop and take pictures after lowering my seat of my riding buddies descending the same trail. If the trail requires numerous climbs and descents I can either leave it a little low (which is fine for climbing and descending and the flats, it won't kill you) or leave it where it was and just get behind the saddle which is still a better location to be than crouched because you COG is more behind the bike not just lower at the center and this helps prevent OTB.

    Anyway try a regular post. See if you don't appreciate the lighter bike and the solid interface.
    Try this: HTFU

  46. #46
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    They're great for descending and pumping...sure. What about flat singletrack...leading to a drop...no descending there, but still an excellent thing to have. I wouldn't do a 4' drop w/ a seatpost up ma'butt.


    axolotl: Why in your opinion do your peers need to ride at max potential all the time? The majority of MTB'ers aren't racing. There's no real hurry. Sure...every wannabe out there is trying to ride like Peaty, but is it all that necessary? Nope. Some people would rather to amaze you at their "moving around" instead of adding a boat anchor to an already portly ride.

    You can't figure out why people "limit themselves to such a degree"? It's because people choose to ride how they want. Droppers aren't for everyone. People with SS rigid 29'ers limit themselves to a degree IMO, but they also give themselves advantages that are more highly valued "to them".

    I know that it's trendy to say we are pushing the envelope all the time...lying to ourselves thinking we're badazz. I'll bet there's some dude out there watching someone like you ride and saying..."I'm amazed at how inefficiently he pumps that tranny"...I could feed that pumptrack to him.

    You don't always have to ride 200%. It's fun to go fast, it's fun to go slow. It's fun to have a dropper and boost some structures and slam down some gnar DH trails. It's also fun to have a 28lb 7x7 that can take a pounding of sorts.

    Everybody has their preference...thank God there are so many needs out there that we can have so many choices becoming readily available to us.



    IMO...$250-$300 for a seatpost is just asinine. $1000 for a set of I9's is total rape. $1200 for a fork is retarded. If I had the money...I'd be pimping a bike with all of the above though.


    The only thing that's holding me back from getting another GD is price. I had one, I loved it. I changed regions that really didn't make use of a $250 post. I sold it so I could drop weight. I'd buy another one in a heartbeat though if they weren't so stinking silly expensive.
    I get my boards at Lux-RC.com

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by nord1899 View Post
    ...I actually wouldn't mind going from the 125mm Reverb to a 100mm post.
    Exactly what I did. Got me a 100mm Reverb for my BLTc and moved the 125mm to the Nomad.
    Naysayers never apologize. Critics go to their grave thinking everyone else is wrong.
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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockcrusher View Post
    Am I wrong or couldn't you just loosen your seat QR at the pump track then raise it when you leave? How much is an extra 1/2 to 1 lb placed really high on your bike that requires extra maintenance, extra stuff on your handlebar and extra dollars really worth? More than a $20qr and how much more?

    Since the days of the Repack people have been riding their bikes without remotes. Sure there was the hiterite which worked well cost little and weighed nothing but that went away during the era of all things lighter. Now someone has made a better mousetrap and everyone is scrambling to get them.

    All I hear is how they fail, how they wobble, rock back and forth, how it is hard to get the cable to look good on the cage and how expensive they are and what the next model will be that fixes all these problems. Been hearing that since the first Maverick Speedball came out.

    I have a seat post i bought in 1990, I am still using it, it still works. I lower it by hand at the top of super tech rides because I am not racing and can wait 10 seconds that it takes to get off, adjust my bike and then remount. I can raise it at the bottom because again I am not in a race, sometimes i stop and take pictures after lowering my seat of my riding buddies descending the same trail. If the trail requires numerous climbs and descents I can either leave it a little low (which is fine for climbing and descending and the flats, it won't kill you) or leave it where it was and just get behind the saddle which is still a better location to be than crouched because you COG is more behind the bike not just lower at the center and this helps prevent OTB.

    Anyway try a regular post. See if you don't appreciate the lighter bike and the solid interface.
    Been there, done it. Why don't you try a dropper for a better perspective of what we're talking about and see if all those things you named are things you can live w/ because what a dropper can do for your riding enjoyment? If you truly believe in your logic, you should be back on a full rigid...hey no moving parts that require service...ever!
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  49. #49
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    The dropper posts get a big "eh" in my book. I had an AMP 4" dropper post and rode it for a season. I ride in the Boston area that has a lot of technical ups and downs. So you don't want the post roadie high and you don't want it Freeride low. So you end up finding the sweet spot and leaving it there for 90% of your riding. I tried popping it up and down every time I went up and down and I found myself going crazy with how often I had to pop the damn' thing. Then it started to run into issues where it would get stuck down or up and that's when I sold it. It was making me crazy while riding and riding should be the opposite of that.

    I could see it being more useful if you lived in a place with longer ups and downs but even when I went out west I didn't find myself wishing for one. When I knew a climb was coming up I raised the post and when we got to the top I dropped it.

    As far as big hits go if I'm familiar with a drop or a sketchy down I can hit them with my post in normal position. If I come to an unfamiliar feature I always stop and eyeball it anyway so no need for a dropper there.

    I see it all the time in our area. Somebody gets a dropper and raves about how awesome it is. A month or 2 later it gets an eh, it's kinda cool. 6 months later it breaks and then you never see that dude with one again.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    They're great for descending and pumping...sure. What about flat singletrack...leading to a drop...no descending there, but still an excellent thing to have. I wouldn't do a 4' drop w/ a seatpost up ma'butt.


    axolotl: Why in your opinion do your peers need to ride at max potential all the time? The majority of MTB'ers aren't racing. There's no real hurry. Sure...every wannabe out there is trying to ride like Peaty, but is it all that necessary? Nope. Some people would rather to amaze you at their "moving around" instead of adding a boat anchor to an already portly ride.
    I see what you are saying. If you have fun pedaling a bike-then by all means pedal away. I think that riding the "fun stuff" with your seat up is like holding onto the bars with one finger. It is conter-productive and very fun diminishing.
    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    You can't figure out why people "limit themselves to such a degree"? It's because people choose to ride how they want. Droppers aren't for everyone. People with SS rigid 29'ers limit themselves to a degree IMO, but they also give themselves advantages that are more highly valued "to them".
    That is true, droppers aren't for everyone. I was talking more about the belief that riding with a high seat is bad. I was not saying everyone needs a dropper

    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    I know that it's trendy to say we are pushing the envelope all the time...lying to ourselves thinking we're badazz. I'll bet there's some dude out there watching someone like you ride and saying..."I'm amazed at how inefficiently he pumps that tranny"...I could feed that pumptrack to him.
    Yes I'm sure that's true, but they won't say "Look how inefficient he is with that saddle crammed up his ass" cause it'l just be me screwing up the tranny, I won't be limiting myself with my gear
    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    ...it's fun to go slow....
    No it's not. That's just stupid

  51. #51
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    i've been following threads like this for a while now, but still can't seem to figure out if it would even be worth buying one for my rides here in texas on my 5.25" Epiphany. a typical ride for me is up and downs that can have 500 - 1000 ft of climbing in total and some descents in the 45 sec to a little over 2 min range. of course there are places in austin and the hill country that have some pretty technical riding with some decent sized ledges to navigate that i ride a handful of times a year. and i can't rule out an excursion out of texas maybe once a year.

    ever since i made a trip to whistler for some DH riding, i've been wanting to really progress my DH-ing abilities much further than they were. the problem is a) you can't progress with a seat all up in your arse/crotch but also (b) i don't have super-long descents like other places in the country - hence my uncertainty.

    what are y'alls thoughts?

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by joshstud View Post
    i've been following threads like this for a while now, but still can't seem to figure out if it would even be worth buying one for my rides here in texas on my 5.25" Epiphany. a typical ride for me is up and downs that can have 500 - 1000 ft of climbing in total and some descents in the 45 sec to a little over 2 min range. of course there are places in austin and the hill country that have some pretty technical riding with some decent sized ledges to navigate that i ride a handful of times a year. and i can't rule out an excursion out of texas maybe once a year.

    ever since i made a trip to whistler for some DH riding, i've been wanting to really progress my DH-ing abilities much further than they were. the problem is a) you can't progress with a seat all up in your arse/crotch but also (b) i don't have super-long descents like other places in the country - hence my uncertainty.

    what are y'alls thoughts?
    IMO, you seem like the perfect canidate. your descents are quick and followed by another uphill. if they were longer downhills i wouldnt mind manually dropping the seat. but for quick short ones it would be annoying. a dropper post would make it easier for you. so IMO, ide say get one. ive survived the kind of riding you do with a regular post, but i find it nicer to have the dropper post

  53. #53
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    If the terrain has a continuous ups then goes to a continuous down, then a dropper post will not be much of a use in that situation. Once you're at the top, just adjust the saddle lower for the sweet descends.

    But if the terrain is full of ups and downs, then it will be much more convenient to have a dropper, IMHO.

    My ride is as simple as it gets, no suspension, 1 gear. I still love the dropper.

    I see in awe those XC racers rides descends with a fully extended seatpost. The damn saddle will get stuck if I try that. I also see that they're on clipless and their footwork is heel's up. Maybe that gave them an additional few inches of space between the butt and saddle? I'm riding platform therefore tiptoeing isn't advisable.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by axolotl View Post
    I am always amazed when people say things like this. Moving around just fine needs examination. "Moving around just fine" vs. piloting a bike to it's potential are drastically different. I'd say moving around fine is moving very poorly and not fine at all. I can't figure out why there are so many people who limit themselves to such a huge degree. Getting behind the saddle is great example of just how bad it is to ride with a high saddle. What must one do to get behind a saddle? How about to get back on/above/or in-front of the saddle?Do these movements and timings associated with positioning behind a saddle allow the bike to dictate fore/aft riding position? (rhetorical - they don't)

    I'm not saying someone who rides with a high saddle it is a poor rider, I'm saying someone who does it is riding poorly.

    A really good argument for dropper posts is reduce the number of people riding poorly.
    Try riding a pump track with a high saddle.
    I would suggest that you keep a more open mind. Just because a lower seat works for you doesn't mean it works for everyone. I invite you to ride with me anytime and you once clean every climb I do and crush me on the downhill then you can say I ride poorly. Before then you have no idea how I ride

  55. #55
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    Possible reasons are price, weight, and handlebar clutter.

    On an "AM" bike, none are very good reasons. You already paid a lot - pony up to make it much better, weight is not as important, and deal with it.

  56. #56
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    It was the best 160 dollars I have spent on riding over the last 6 years.
    Gravity Dropper Turbo, no problems so far. Easy to rebuild if things do go bad.

    Makes riding twice as fun!
    Will not ride AM without one now!
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  57. #57
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    I've had a KS i950 for a couple seasons. Probably the best upgrade I've made to my Giant Trance. With regular maintenance(like most parts of any bicycle), I've had no major problems. No doubt parts wear out eventually and there are factory defects; that's why there is this thing called a warranty.
    Where I ride in the Pacific NW, I can't imagine riding without it. Where I ride in Texas, you don't really need one.
    If you don't want one or if you don't need one; don't buy one.

  58. #58
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    they are great if you have a lot of short duration (less than 2 or 3 minute) climbs and descents. If you have long, long climbs followed by long DH sections then just keep using your QR and getting off your bike. Almost everyone that rides with one will tell you that they're great.

    as for those claiming it is a "band wagon" thing, you don't know what you are missing. compared to the price of forks today, ridiculous, they are a bargain for what they do to your ride.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by joshstud View Post
    i've been following threads like this for a while now, but still can't seem to figure out if it would even be worth buying one for my rides here in texas on my 5.25" Epiphany. a typical ride for me is up and downs that can have 500 - 1000 ft of climbing in total and some descents in the 45 sec to a little over 2 min range. of course there are places in austin and the hill country that have some pretty technical riding with some decent sized ledges to navigate that i ride a handful of times a year. and i can't rule out an excursion out of texas maybe once a year.

    ever since i made a trip to whistler for some DH riding, i've been wanting to really progress my DH-ing abilities much further than they were. the problem is a) you can't progress with a seat all up in your arse/crotch but also (b) i don't have super-long descents like other places in the country - hence my uncertainty.

    what are y'alls thoughts?
    if the descents are at all technical with any drop offs, jumps, etc. then your "average ride" is perfect for a dropper post. It is the complete opposite type of trails where a dropper isn't as beneficial. Getting off the bike 4 times an hour isn't a big deal. Getting off it every 3 - 5 minutes is a PITA.

  60. #60
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    Has anyone felt weighed down by their GD? Nope, not me.

    If you don't wanna even want to try one, it's your loss.

  61. #61
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    And if you try it and don't like it...sell it to me at a healthy discounted rate and consider it a learning experience.
    I get my boards at Lux-RC.com

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    I would suggest that you keep a more open mind. Just because a lower seat works for you doesn't mean it works for everyone. I invite you to ride with me anytime and you once clean every climb I do and crush me on the downhill then you can say I ride poorly. Before then you have no idea how I ride
    My mind is as open or shut as it is...but for the kind of riding I'm talking about - yes, a lower saddle works better for everyone.

    And I didn't mean poorly compared to me, I meant poorly compared to how you could ride with a properly adjusted saddle. A properly adjusted bike is a properly adjusted bike. Saddle height adjusted to pedal easy terrain is misadjusted for everything else-period. If you want to ride that way - cool. It is limiting - but cool ride how you want.
    Yes, I don't have any idea how you ride and since I don't care how many climbs I clean, I really am not interested in how many climbs you clean or in crushing you on anything. Saddle height is common knowledge. I'm not telling you anything that someone you respect that has a basic understanding of riding won't tell you.

  63. #63
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    Had an AMP for a few years (now being rebuilt for my son's bike )
    Now have a Reverb. It is an early original release and still works a charm.

    I ride primarily in ravine systems... so lots of short ups and down. I can ride them full saddle height, but prefer to be able to be fully extended for the easy climbs and flowie stuff, but for tech climbing, or rough seated, I prefer to be down a bit, then fully down for any fun stuff.

    Now, something that I never use is fork travel adjust, or any type of lockout. I have suspension for a reason, so I like it active.

    your mileage may vary

    michael

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by mykel View Post
    Now, something that I never use is fork travel adjust, or any type of lockout. I have suspension for a reason, so I like it active.
    After I got an adjustable post with a remote I have realized that I do not really need travel adjust and lockout for the fork - I can climb with proper full extension that puts me in a better climbing position - and drop down at any sign of of trouble. I think I do use remote lockout almost as often as shifter; though I really only use two or three speeds when riding on my big bike.

    That means that you can save by getting a fork with less adjustments - to offset the post's cost.

  65. #65
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    No one here has the Command Post? We have 3 of them and they work flawlessly. I couldn't live without it.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitek79 View Post
    No one here has the Command Post? We have 3 of them and they work flawlessly. I couldn't live without it.
    I have a command post and never had an issue. For me a dropper is about having the right saddle height for your knees when pedaling, then being able to drop it right before a technical section.

    Before a dropper if you rode really technical stuff, the seat was in a position of a compromise, with a dropper there's no need for that.

    Will never ride without one again.
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  67. #67
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    I have my reverb and love it..... gets a lot of use and takes beatings.

  68. #68
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    I scored a slightly used like-new crank bros joplin 4 w/ remote on ebay and I love it. My bike has a XC setup so I'm really stretched out and the handlebars are really low.... on descents I can't get my butt behind the saddle unless my arms are stretched out to the max.

    The dropper seatpost really helped a lot. However today I rode a FS in a medium (my xc bike is a large), with a shorter stem and riser bars and even with my seat all the way up I had no problem getting my butt behind the seat and near the rear wheel on descents.

    The truth is if I didn't need it, I'd rather not have it because of excess weight and just more things that could break.

  69. #69
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    You might not "need" one.
    But it makes you a much faster descender.

    If you can tell me that your just as fast with a post up your butthole as you are with a 4-5" post drop on the downhills. Your insane and need help. Or your not riding "AM"
    Gamut
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  70. #70
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    Droppers are great if you ride trails with lots of short ups and downs. I mostly ride dedicated climbs into dedicated DH with few short ups and downs so a dropper isn't much help.

    The way I see it, droppers are the only way to go for super D racing, and trails that never give you long DH or climbs, if those things don't describe your riding, a standard post will save weight, money, and keep things simple.

  71. #71
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    I have said "no" to a dropper post for a year now and I ride in Sedona, lots of up and down and everything techy. My cranks are quite short so I have a lot of seat post showing. If I knew I was coming to an extended DH, I would just loosen the collar and drop the seat. The real pain comes when you have to stop at the bottom and raise it up again! I now have a dropper on its way, if I don't like it I can dump it cheap and call it a lesson learned.

  72. #72
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    I've been using my KS dropper post for about a week. I know I'm going faster downhill because my Garmin tells me I am but it doesn't feel as fast or dangerous.

    On the other hand, when I drop it down the full 4 inches I feel like one of those guys you see pedaling the Wal Mart bike to their job at Burger King. The seat is just too low. I'm discovering that the point is getting the saddle out of the way so you can get low, not to sit on the saddle.

    Still feels awkward but I like the post so far. Do I need it in Louisiana? Not really. My daily trail (Lincoln Parish Park) has a few steep descents but nothing major. Mostly choppy, short, sharp climbs, roots, and tight turns. I ride a 2011 Specialized Enduro Comp, itself overkill for our trails but I'm a big guy.

    Now the Hammerschmidt was a definite positive upgrade. And I had my rear shock "Pushed" and the difference is remarkable.

    But I have money so within reason I can get cool stuff just for the hell of it. If I was on a budget (like I was in medical school and residency) I would not even consider the dropper post for out trails. I have to remind myself to use it (unlike the Hammerschmidt which is instinct now).

  73. #73
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    How did any of you get by before these things were available?

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by motormonkeyr6 View Post
    You might not "need" one.
    But it makes you a much faster descender.

    If you can tell me that your just as fast with a post up your butthole as you are with a 4-5" post drop on the downhills. Your insane and need help. Or your not riding "AM"
    That's nonsense, everyone in this spode forum knows it's flat pedals/5.10s that make you faster going downhill.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrwhlr View Post
    How did any of you get by before these things were available?
    Remember, they probably said the same thing about suspension, hydraulic brakes, and a lot of other things that we now consider standard. It's a hobby. You spend money at it. Since investing money nowadays is for suckers may as well get some fun out of it

    For the record though I just built a rigid single speed. Old school and I love it...but it has a carbon fork, hydraulic disc brakes, and weighs 18 pounds.

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post
    Been there, done it. Why don't you try a dropper for a better perspective of what we're talking about and see if all those things you named are things you can live w/ because what a dropper can do for your riding enjoyment? If you truly believe in your logic, you should be back on a full rigid...hey no moving parts that require service...ever!
    FWIW I tried a dropper, called the hiterite back in the day for 8 years or so, then spent the next decade and a half riding various bikes from short travel XC bikes to 7" travel freeride bikes all without a dropper post and mostly with either a seatpost QR or nothing just a properly adjusted seat and never managed to miss the hiterite. I now ride a full rigid 29er singlespeed. I accompany people of Full suspension AM/FR bikes and in the steep technical stuff I have no problems riding what they ride so I see no need to add the extra poundage and gadgets to my bike.

    I enjoy riding my bike enough without more ad driven gizmos and I don't think spending another $300 on something that isn't broken will increase my enjoyment. Riding more will increase my enjoyment.

    I grab my bike, check the pressure and roll out the door. As you said no service and no worries. Perfect combo for someone short on time and tight in the wallet, but all I am saying is ask yourself before spending all that money on more complex maintenance needing parts if you actually need that or you just want to add it to your bike because it is the new thing? Ask yourself if placing that extra weight up high is worth the benefits, or the extra maintenance is worth the benefits or the somewhat sporadic lifespan and durability is worth the benefits? That is all I am saying. Sometimes we jump on trends that aren't great ideas because they are marketed well. I have lived the evolution of mountain biking, the fads and the segmenting of the market and a lot of bad decisions were embraced because not for the advancement of enjoyment bu fort the advancement of marketing.
    Try this: HTFU

  77. #77
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    There are 2 main reasons to use a dropper seatpost:

    1. Too large stomach

    2. Poor riding techniques

  78. #78
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    I get off my saddle ass to release the QR and lower the seat. I get back on the bike and ride down hill. Too many stupid gadgets today for something that was meant for getting into shape or blowing all of your energy off.
    Ragley Blue Pig

  79. #79
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    I prefer a standard post. I ride trail and dh. I have tried a couple different dropper posts, speedball and reverb(currently own). My rides tend to be a big up, mix between fireroad and technical trail, to an extended downhill. I set my seat to accommodate tech uphill, then slam it for dh. This works perfectly for me.

    I appreciate the weight savings. I appreciate zero movement. I can feel the dropper posts(both that I have tried) move slightly back and forth while climbing seated, which is annoying to me. I like less bar clutter(speedball was nice with the lever under the saddle.)

    Dropper posts work great for a ton of folks. My Reverb performs flawlessly, but the down sides(however minor they may seem) out weigh the even smaller amount of benefits for me and my riding.

  80. #80
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    I'm starting to ride some trails with lots of short technical sections and can definitely see a huge advantage having one, but I'm the type where even a slightly wobbly seat would drive me nuts. I'm really interested to see what FOX has to offer with their new post, but it seems like it's been stuck in R&D for forever now. I thought I heard that it was going to be mechanical movement which seems to be better as far as reliability issues go. Seems like I hear way fewer issues with the GD's than their hydro counterparts and I really prefer the cable terminating at the base of the seatpost rather than having the extra loop up to the seat mount post. Is Gravity D the only mechanical dropper on the market right now? Just wish they would come out with a more modern looking post - those suckers are FUGLY.

  81. #81
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    I think I hurt my knee this summer with overuse of dropper post after two decades of never dropping the post... sure Ihave felt something on my knees on occasional days in the park with rental DH sleds but nothing this bad.
    No problems with Reverb other than having to add air to it once during these 5 months. I do like it a lot when riding unknown technical trails - there is always option to push the button when there is trouble ahead. I think my greatest mistake was pedaling too much with seat down but I'm guessing most people have better knees than me and will not experience same issues.

  82. #82
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    I'm a penny pincher.

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrwhlr View Post
    How did any of you get by before these things were available?
    My friend and I rode Snowshoe Mountain on 2000 SWorks FSRs on 1.9 tires less than 100mm of travel.

    We got by doing it, does it it mean when I go back to Snowshoe I want to ride that vs a bike with 130-150mm travel and 2.3-2.5 tires -hell no.

    It's called progress. Now I can have my seat in the proper position for pedaling and not be hurting my knees. Flick of a lever drop for log piles and other technical stuff, clear it and pop it back up to ride.
    The real question is why wouldn't I.

    We got along just fine with horses before the car, do you ride a horse to work?
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  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by keen View Post
    If they made a 7" drop I'd have one.
    The Black Momba dropped 9" but I don't know if it ever sold well, or if it's still around? I know it was priced WAY high when it first came out a few years ago.

    All the droppers on the market don't drop low enough for me either. I just did a ride with a guy with a dropper who had to dig through his pack for his multi tool to lower his dropper at the collar because his post wouldn't drop low enough for the steep lines we were riding. I often drop my saddle to the rails, and can do it on the fly pretty easily. Droppers are fast and efficient, but they aren't the only way to slam the saddle and you may be limited in how low you can go which is a deal breaker for me.

    If my saddle was up just a few inches from the rails It would have hit me in my stomach on this line preventing me from getting as low as I needed to be.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Reasons why say NO on a DROPPER SEATPOST-still-2.jpg  


  85. #85
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    Furthermore....I'm willing to bet none of you money wasters are actually going any faster than before acquiring these mechanical liabilities.

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrwhlr View Post
    How did any of you get by before these things were available?

    I prefer not to think about the "dark days"...it was horrible.
    rOCktoberfest 2015 pt I here
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  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrwhlr View Post
    Furthermore....I'm willing to bet none of you money wasters are actually going any faster than before acquiring these mechanical liabilities.
    Faster? Definitely. Not on the downs, but certainly on the ups. As mentioned, I used to ride with my fixed post at not quite optimal height because I do so much technical climbing. With the GD's 1 inch option drop, I can run optimal height and drop 1 inch for the tech climbs. That has made a world of difference right there.
    Then there's group rides on a descent with a sudden uphill spin. If I'm stuck in a group I'm going to spin the hill with my seat still down, bad for the knees. Not so anymore.

    I held out until about a month ago to get a GD, I was waiting for all the flaws to be worked out. Truth is that GD has had a reliable product for years, just have to be willing to live with the boot. Those who know however, ride with the boot.
    "...like sex with the trail." - Boe

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by bloodpuddle View Post
    they're still a generation or two away from being sufficiently reliable that I'd bother getting one.
    Yes. You should wait until they are more reliable, especially based upon my experience.

    I was riding two days ago and I went to drop my saddle. Hit the lever on the handlebar and SNAP!!!!!!!!!

    The damn cable broke!

    I have only been using that Gravity Dropper for 5 years and the cable broke!

    HORRIBLE RELIABILITY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  89. #89
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    I usually leave the seat up. I've ridden a few different dropper posts and see the appeal, but two weeks ago I went riding in the sierras with some friends. One friend couldn't lower his reverb in the cold temperature. It wouldn't budge. We had about 4-5 inches of snow on the ground, I broke my derailleur and couldn't pedal, but at least I could drop my seat for all the fun stuff.

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by xchinvanderlinden View Post
    I usually leave the seat up.
    You are not married, I surmise...

  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dose Of Reality View Post
    Yes. You should wait until they are more reliable, especially based upon my experience.

    I was riding two days ago and I went to drop my saddle. Hit the lever on the handlebar and SNAP!!!!!!!!!

    The damn cable broke!

    I have only been using that Gravity Dropper for 5 years and the cable broke!

    HORRIBLE RELIABILITY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    i hope this is sarcasm..

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrwhlr View Post
    How did any of you get by before these things were available?
    I either rode everything with the seat at full height, which for me was suboptimal with respect to descending fun; rode everything with my seat in an intermediate position, which made my knees hurt and was suboptimal for climbing; or I stopped 15 times a ride to adjust the seatpost for descents and climbs, which was a pain in the ass. I was glad to get a device that enabled me to change my seat height on the fly because it gives me the best of all worlds and makes riding our terrain more fun.


    Quote Originally Posted by Mrwhlr View Post
    Furthermore....I'm willing to bet none of you money wasters are actually going any faster than before acquiring these mechanical liabilities.
    Maybe not, but I am having more fun and that's all the justification I need.

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrwhlr View Post
    Furthermore....I'm willing to bet none of you money wasters are actually going any faster than before acquiring these mechanical liabilities.
    Post up a pic of your rigid SS
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  94. #94
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    Not knowing what it is like to ride one helps me feel comfortable in the decision to bot buy one as I simply do not know what I am missing out on. The majority of the rides out here are ride up the mountain ride down the mountain-style, so I don't mind.

  95. #95
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    Every time I ride with someone who doesn't have a adjustable seat post, they spend half the ride complaining about it and saying how they wish they had one. If you don't think you need one, you probably ride really lame-ass trails, and you should stick to posting in the XC forum.

    Grow some balls, buy a Gravity Dropper and some Mountain Dew, and go shred the Gnar!

  96. #96
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    I know a few people have commented on this already, but I want to restate it -

    The first thing to come to terms with for some of you - and this could be hard - is that having your seat lower allows for proper technique during downhill or technical sections. This is not an opinion, it's a fact. If you disagree, hit up vitalmtb.com or pinkbike or something and tell me how many dudes are running full seat height while riding downhill or freeride stuff. Tell me how many world cup DH racers run the seat at full height. They are the best in the world at what they do, and they all chose to ride with low seat heights. If you wish to utilize optimal technique while riding - and thus do harder stuff safer and faster - you will need to lower your seat. If you feel you can ride "well enough", or you can do anything that YOU want to do with your seat up that is fine - but understand that this is not the preferable, optimal technique. A lot of people "like" to do things the wrong way. That is between them and their deity. I can't help with that.

    A second and less disputed fact would be that having your seat at full height leads to far superior pedaling power and efficiency - basically no one is going to argue this, but it's easy to look at professional XC and road racers for proof if you feel unconvinced.

    So the two facts - having your seat low allows for correct downhill technique, and having your seat high allows for maximum pedaling efficiency - make clear that for different parts of the ride, you may want your seat at different positions. How you chose to solve that problem is up to you, but an adjustable seatpost is the FASTEST way to do so repeatedly (something that matters to me).

    How did I live without one? Well...I ran my seat too low all the time. In this way, having an adjustable post really changed my riding. Instead of beating ass constantly with my seat a few inches too low I can now hit a switch and raise it to optimal height for non-technical sections. I am faster, more efficient, and can ride further and longer than before without having to ride conservatively or awkwardly with limited technique on technical downhills and fun sections. As a side bonus, my knees feel quite a bit better than they have in years. Despite the extra 250-300 grams over a Thompson, my bike is still under 33 pounds. I find this to be totally acceptable.

    As far as cost, I don't give a ****. Compared to everything else in life, bicycling is cheap. Compared to the total cost of the bicycle, an extra $200 on the adjustable post over a Thompson or equivalent is negligible. The most important thing to me is having as much fun as possible while riding my bike. I have clearly more fun with the adjustable post than without. I'll be ordering another for my second bike as soon as possible (Gravity Dropper again - their customer service and reliability are without peer).

    As far as I can see, the only reason not to get an adjustable post is that you're a ****ing animal and just kill it all the time with your seat slammed. In that case, pass on it. You''ll be going so much faster in non-tech sections with your seat up that your buddies won't be able to ride with you anymore. They'll have to meet you back in the parking lot afterwards.

  97. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad news View Post
    I know a few people have commented on this already, but I want to restate it -

    The first thing to come to terms with for some of you - and this could be hard - is that having your seat lower allows for proper technique during downhill or technical sections. This is not an opinion, it's a fact. If you disagree, hit up vitalmtb.com or pinkbike or something and tell me how many dudes are running full seat height while riding downhill or freeride stuff. Tell me how many world cup DH racers run the seat at full height. They are the best in the world at what they do, and they all chose to ride with low seat heights. If you wish to utilize optimal technique while riding - and thus do harder stuff safer and faster - you will need to lower your seat. If you feel you can ride "well enough", or you can do anything that YOU want to do with your seat up that is fine - but understand that this is not the preferable, optimal technique. A lot of people "like" to do things the wrong way. That is between them and their deity. I can't help with that.

    A second and less disputed fact would be that having your seat at full height leads to far superior pedaling power and efficiency - basically no one is going to argue this, but it's easy to look at professional XC and road racers for proof if you feel unconvinced.

    So the two facts - having your seat low allows for correct downhill technique, and having your seat high allows for maximum pedaling efficiency - make clear that for different parts of the ride, you may want your seat at different positions. How you chose to solve that problem is up to you, but an adjustable seatpost is the FASTEST way to do so repeatedly (something that matters to me).

    How did I live without one? Well...I ran my seat too low all the time. In this way, having an adjustable post really changed my riding. Instead of beating ass constantly with my seat a few inches too low I can now hit a switch and raise it to optimal height for non-technical sections. I am faster, more efficient, and can ride further and longer than before without having to ride conservatively or awkwardly with limited technique on technical downhills and fun sections. As a side bonus, my knees feel quite a bit better than they have in years. Despite the extra 250-300 grams over a Thompson, my bike is still under 33 pounds. I find this to be totally acceptable.

    As far as cost, I don't give a ****. Compared to everything else in life, bicycling is cheap. Compared to the total cost of the bicycle, an extra $200 on the adjustable post over a Thompson or equivalent is negligible. The most important thing to me is having as much fun as possible while riding my bike. I have clearly more fun with the adjustable post than without. I'll be ordering another for my second bike as soon as possible (Gravity Dropper again - their customer service and reliability are without peer).

    As far as I can see, the only reason not to get an adjustable post is that you're a ****ing animal and just kill it all the time with your seat slammed. In that case, pass on it. You''ll be going so much faster in non-tech sections with your seat up that your buddies won't be able to ride with you anymore. They'll have to meet you back in the parking lot afterwards.
    Yep. Anyone who thinks they're optimally set up for technical descending with the seat at full XC height needs their head checked.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.P View Post
    *sigh* Get a Gravity Dropper and run it for years without issue. No oil. No air spring. Full mechanical function, great support. It's ugly. Get over it.

    If you want pretty, you get issues too. (sounds like life )

    In a couple of years the air and oil droppers will get their issues sorted, but life is to short not to get low and pin that turn/huck that jump/soak up that drop.

    P

    The gravity dropper is ugly, but it just keeps on going. I have had mine (turbo version) 2 1/2 years. I have regreased it once and replaced the cable once. The cable didn't need replacing, I just needed it longer to point the release backwards.
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by foot hill View Post
    been wanting one and have the money all saved up, but just cant decide

    1)add @ 500+gms (yes, i do visit ww forum often)
    2)add another cable and lever to bar(jealous of single speed simplicity)
    3) possible failure of dropper (least of my concerns really but still factor)
    OR

    1)get lower for tech stuff,climbing and decending
    2)get even lower for the stuff that really scares me
    3) get alittle higher for the steep & smooth ( on most tech trails i have saddle a little lower than the optimal height for climbing efficiently)

    so i just keep waiting,wondering, reading threads like this

    BTW...Aren Timmel won this years TS100 with a dropper post! actually he smashed the coarse! so, i think i am going to get one!
    .......I think...

    Actually, the weight gain is about 500 gr - your current seat post weight. So, if you had a Thomson Elite like me, you do 500-230. You get a 270 gr increase.

    Oh wait, you have to add the weight of the bugs in your teeth from you smiling so much going down hill that much faster!!!!
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by lew242 View Post
    I want one, but I don't need one, because I don't race, and have coil front and rear because I ride a lot so I have enough weight already. If I hear consistent reports that they last at least for a few years I'll be in.

    I race without my drop post. Most XC courses don't need it. Downiville is the only exception that I can think of that I have done.

    As for hearing consistent report, you have. They all relate to the Gravity Dropper brand.
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

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