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  1. #1
    Oh, So Interesting!
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    My American Pit Bull Terrier Defended Me From a Bull Moose

    I was mt. biking today in the Front Range of CO when I came across a HUGE bull moose. I was going about 10 mph down a rolling, rocky trail when the moose crashed out of the woods and onto the trail about 20-30 ft in front of me, WAY too close for comfort. I skidded to a stop and watched as the moose turned to face me. It was huge, his head must have stood 8 ft tall, and he had enormous antlers. I was deciding what to do, resisting the urge to run, but looking for an escape route... I didn't think I had much of a chance if he charged, but was poised to run at a 90 degree angle to the trail and into the densest trees I could find when my dog Dorje jumped out of the woods between the moose and me, ran at the moose, jumped up at him but didn't manage to get a good hold on the moose. The moose swung at him with his antlers, but Dorje jumped back out of the way. The moose was surprisingly fast and graceful with his attack for such a huge animal. Dorje responded by barking and growling at the moose, and stood his ground. It was a standoff... So, I decided a retreat was in order, and got on my bike pointed away from the moose, which was a downhill slope at that point in the trail (great luck). I called Dorje with a "Lets Go!", the signal I am getting on my bike and leaving the area. Thankfully, he backed away from the moose and followed me down the trail. He had a huge grin on his face, this was great fun for him.

    Some pics from today and one from this spring:









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  2. #2
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    Good job Vick.

  3. #3
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    Nice one Dave and Dorje. Bet you're glad you went west of the Peak to Peak today!
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  4. #4
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    You ride around with an UNLEASHED PIT BULL? People like you are why my mom is terrified to walk her dog anywhere outside of town.

    Even if it's the best dog in the world (which it may well be, given this encounter!), this is only acceptable if you never, ever see a stranger on the trail or you own the land. No matter how good his behavior is, the other dog can always be the one to start a fight, and if it's on a leash you are the one in the wrong. Not to mention that a loose pit bull is incredibly intimidating - if I saw it way up the trail I would consider it necessary to turn around or detour way above it. No one else knows if your dog is wonderful or psychotic.

  5. #5
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    Good thing the moose didn't get to the dog. Even if the dog did get a good bite of the huge beast, It would probably be like a crawfish having a good clamp onto your index finger, at which point you just flick it off where it lands 15 feet from you.

  6. #6
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    nevermind
    Last edited by slocaus; 07-23-2007 at 12:21 AM.
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  7. #7
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    Davec113,
    You forgot the one of Dorje with his ears flyin' in the wind and the unbridled joy on his face running the singletrack. That pic does my heart good!

    Give him an extra pat and a biscuit for the bravery and loyalty he showed you today!
    Last edited by slocaus; 07-23-2007 at 12:21 AM.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mitrovarr
    You ride around with an UNLEASHED SPAWN OF SATAN? People like you are why my mom is terrified to walk her dog anywhere outside of town.
    Thats Hilarious!... or disappointing, I'm not sure which. Pits used to be viewed a lot differently than they are today, as a family dog, guardian of kids, ww2 armed forced mascot, etc... the Little Rascals dog was a Pit. Even modern studies show that your mom's golden retriever (guess) is more likely to bite a child than an American Pit Bull Terrier. Apparently your views are dictated to you by our media (thats the disappointing part).

    It is true they are likely to be DOG aggressive, but thats completely seperate from aggression to humans. My dog does not happen to be dog aggressive on the trail, and will avoid fights if possible. I wanted this trait so I looked for it when I bought my dog. If he is attacked by another dog that is off a leash, then my leashing him isn't helping anyway. He has met hundreds of dogs in parks and on trails without fighting with any of them. I trust that he will not provoke a fight or retaliate unless he is viciously attacked.

    I only let him off leash where it is allowed.
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  9. #9
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    That's awesome that your dog stood up to that animal to cover for you like that
    :wq

  10. #10
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    It's not because it's a pit bull, it's just that I hate loose dogs. My mom's dog was once attacked by someone else's dog (ironically, it wasn't loose, it broke its leash) while I was walking here, and I've come very close to being attacked multiple times myself. I've been turned back on some bike rides because some redneck moron had his 3 dogs guarding the road, or something along those lines. And those were, in fact, golden retrievers or similar breeds, as was the dog that's come closest to attacking me - the only dogs I don't mind seeing loose are tiny, harmless ones.

    It's extra bad because it's a Pit Bull, though, because they are more powerful if they do cause problems, and they're extra intimidating - a lot of idiots breed them for dog fighting so much of the time they're extremely aggressive. The fact remains that I don't know if your dog is a fighting dog out for exercise or the nicest dog ever bred - if I see it, I'll have to turn back, or circle around to avoid it, or wait for you to control it. By myself I might risk it, but I'm not going to take my dog by it, and my mom is even more cautious - a badly-trained pit bull could kill her. The fact of the matter is, ever since my dog was attacked she's extremely spooky around other dogs, and your dog coming up to her might cause her to attack it. However, she's on a leash, so any encounter is entirely your fault.

    Just keep the damn thing on a leash and carry a high-powered rifle if you're worried about moose. I know the gun won't go off randomly, but I have no such assurances about your animal.

  11. #11
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    nevermind
    Last edited by slocaus; 07-23-2007 at 12:21 AM.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus
    Here is some friendly advice. If you do not like something here on MTBR, use your browsers back button and leave. You will not change everyone on the Internet, no matter how strongly you believe you are right. Give it up.
    Wouldn't you be contradicting your own policy by posting it?

  13. #13
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    nevermind
    Last edited by slocaus; 07-23-2007 at 12:22 AM.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus
    Nope, I'm in total support of Davec113 having the right to ride with his dog. He stated that Dorje is only off leash where it is allowed.
    Well, assuming it's true, it changes things a little. I wouldn't take my dog into a place where loose dogs were allowed.

    I've just had a lot of bad experiences with loose dogs in a lot of places where they are expressly forbidden, and have a negative impression of the whole concept. You'd feel the same way if you tried walking with your mom and her dog several times in a beautiful outdoor area, only to be accosted by loose dogs multiple times per walk and nearly attacked about once per trip (which were only averted by getting between the dogs and shouting to scare the aggressor away.) All this in a place where dogs explicitly have to be leashed, marked at the trailhead.

  15. #15
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    Have you called local animal control or anything, mitrovarr? If this is really the epidemic you are presenting, they should be more than willing to help.

    Regardless, way to ruin the guys thread with your ranting
    :wq

  16. #16
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    Nice story! Enjoyed the pics too.

    When riding my bike and I'm approached by a big loose dog I dismount and keep the bike between me and the dog. The smaller ones I outrun or turn around and they back down.
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  17. #17
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    that's one good dog. i wouldn't be afraid of any dog that appears to listen to it's owner that well...
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  18. #18
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    going back to the scheduled programming...

    Great story, sweet dog and awesome shots too!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mitrovarr
    It's not because it's a pit bull, it's just that I hate loose dogs. My mom's dog was once attacked by someone else's dog (ironically, it wasn't loose, it broke its leash) while I was walking here, and I've come very close to being attacked multiple times myself. I've been turned back on some bike rides because some redneck moron had his 3 dogs guarding the road, or something along those lines. And those were, in fact, golden retrievers or similar breeds, as was the dog that's come closest to attacking me - the only dogs I don't mind seeing loose are tiny, harmless ones.

    It's extra bad because it's a Pit Bull, though, because they are more powerful if they do cause problems, and they're extra intimidating - a lot of idiots breed them for dog fighting so much of the time they're extremely aggressive. The fact remains that I don't know if your dog is a fighting dog out for exercise or the nicest dog ever bred - if I see it, I'll have to turn back, or circle around to avoid it, or wait for you to control it. By myself I might risk it, but I'm not going to take my dog by it, and my mom is even more cautious - a badly-trained pit bull could kill her. The fact of the matter is, ever since my dog was attacked she's extremely spooky around other dogs, and your dog coming up to her might cause her to attack it. However, she's on a leash, so any encounter is entirely your fault.

    Just keep the damn thing on a leash and carry a high-powered rifle if you're worried about moose. I know the gun won't go off randomly, but I have no such assurances about your animal.
    i know that everybody on a forum is entiltled to post his/her opinion (which is why im going to post mine). you tell him to carry a high powered rifle if worried about the moose, yeah because thats practical and safe , and then later in this post you say that on several trips you have been chased by lose dogs. so why not take your own advise and either change where you walk or carry pepper spray with you. have you never heard of an accidental discharge. work around guns long enough and accidents happen, guns that are "unloaded" will magically fire when doing dry fire drills. laugh, i have seen it happen. while you do say that only some idiots breed these dogs for fighting, the only sensible statement in all of your post on this thread, you must realize that the pit was doing the exact thing that it was breed for in the first place, protect its master/owner.

    a pit bull is the most loyal dog you could ever hope to have, they are the best around children and have the best temperment of any dog you could hope to have. that being said if an animal or human attacks their master watch out. in case you cant tell by my affection for pit bulls they are my favorite breed and i hate the stigma surrounding the breed. so anyway like the guy said the dog was allowed to be off where he was anyway dont take this as an attack on you personally (hell i dont even know you) anyway sorry about the long post /rant off

  20. #20
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    btw..forgot to say great story and thats a pretty dog you got there

  21. #21
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    Ignore the haters/nitwits. Dogs NEED to be unleashed and run to lead healthy and happy lives, especially the sporting breeds. Running/sprinting is in their genetic make-up...simply part of what makes a dog a dog. Bike w/ both of mine unleashed here in the NE (places where its allowed) Happiest times in their lives, excepting the post ride snooze in the sun, of course.

    *Great* looking dog by the way.

  22. #22
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    Mitrovarr posted

    UNLEASHED PIT BULL
    It's not because it's a pit bull,
    And those were, in fact, golden retrievers or similar breeds, as was the dog that's come closest to attacking me
    It's extra bad because it's a Pit Bull
    Mitrovarr
    Huh?!?!!!!!

    Seems like you should be looking for a thread were the OP says that they went riding recently with their UNLEASHED GOLDEN RETRIEVERS


    davec113

    Great story, I'm glad to hear everyone made it out safely (human, dog, and moose).
    It is difficult for some people to use the two words "too" and "to" appropriately.

    "I had to go where I went, to get where I am. Any other path would have taken me elsewhere, and I may have missed the joy."

  23. #23
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    Makes me wish I could've rescued a cute pit pup from the pound years ago, guess I'll have to head to the pound soon and find another to adopt. I miss my trail partners heads up awareness. I don't see half as many things without a dog pointing them out to me. Moose are not one of those though, they are freakin huge! My dogs once herded a young bull around my house!
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  24. #24
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    my pit/sharpei mix chased a moose into the woods and around right back at us once. had to dive behind trees to avoid being trampled, good times. First time I felt the ground shake since moving from cali.
    Last edited by nOOby; 07-23-2007 at 08:09 AM.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mitrovarr
    It's not because it's a pit bull, it's just that I hate loose dogs. My mom's dog was once attacked by someone else's dog (ironically, it wasn't loose, it broke its leash) while I was walking here, and I've come very close to being attacked multiple times myself. I've been turned back on some bike rides because some redneck moron had his 3 dogs guarding the road, or something along those lines. And those were, in fact, golden retrievers or similar breeds, as was the dog that's come closest to attacking me - the only dogs I don't mind seeing loose are tiny, harmless ones.

    It's extra bad because it's a Pit Bull, though, because they are more powerful if they do cause problems, and they're extra intimidating - a lot of idiots breed them for dog fighting so much of the time they're extremely aggressive. The fact remains that I don't know if your dog is a fighting dog out for exercise or the nicest dog ever bred - if I see it, I'll have to turn back, or circle around to avoid it, or wait for you to control it. By myself I might risk it, but I'm not going to take my dog by it, and my mom is even more cautious - a badly-trained pit bull could kill her. The fact of the matter is, ever since my dog was attacked she's extremely spooky around other dogs, and your dog coming up to her might cause her to attack it. However, she's on a leash, so any encounter is entirely your fault.

    Just keep the damn thing on a leash and carry a high-powered rifle if you're worried about moose. I know the gun won't go off randomly, but I have no such assurances about your animal.
    I'm not even going to bother reading the rest of this post before I tell you to shut your suck-hole and get a life. People like "your mon" scare me on the roads and highways, but nobody's is banning her from driving. Get your panties out of a ball, go back to your sanitized idiot-proof hyper-sensitive world , and let the man and his best friend enjoy themselves.

    Excuse me, I need to go back and catch up on all the stories I've been reading about vicious mountain biking dog attacks. Skrew you.
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  26. #26
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    pit bull stigma?

    Mitrovarr is a bit over the top, agreed.

    However, I am also alarmed and disturbed by the number of dog owners who think it is no big deal to let a pit bull run around loose where it is NOT allowed. It happens in my local State Park regularly.

    First of all, if the rules allow dogs off-leash, then I have no problem with anyone or any breed of dog doing so. I still personally believe it is irresponsible in most cases, because almost all owners are absurdly naive and delusional about how well-behaved and friendly their dog is.

    When I am walking around a state park with my 3 and 5 year olds, any type of dog off-leash is a potential problem. Even a super-friendly, overly enthusiastic dog can knock a little person over easily and/or possibly plant the seed for a fear of dogs that lasts for the rest of their lives. If I went to this particular state park because it does not allow dogs off-leash, then I see the dog-owner's decision to ignore the rule as rude, inconsiderate, selfish, and potentially dangerous for hikers, bikers, and horses.

    When you own a Pit Bull or other breed generally known to be prone to aggressiveness, I think it is quite reasonable for a total stranger to presume that your dog poses a potentially greater risk. Your personal evaluation of your dog's mental stability and track record are meaningless.

    Pit bull owners are quick to talk about how their dogs get a bad rap because people don't "raise them correctly". That's BS. Dogs that are bred primarily for fighting and have a long "rap sheet" of violent maimings and outright murder cannot blame their tendencies on "bad owners" and expect people to buy it. Show me the last golden retriever that seriously injured someone or killed a child.

    Pit Bull owners buy these dogs and then spend the rest of their lives trying to convince everyone in the world that they're truly sweet and loving at heart and incapable of violence. Why bother? If you want to have a dog for self-defense or because he looks tough or whatever, that's fine. But understand that you will be responsible for keeping that animal in check and don't expect anybody to cut you much slack when you try to bend the rules.

  27. #27
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    Not this again.

    Please people, realize that it is not the dog it is the person who trains them. If someone trains them to fight anything they see, then that dog will be a very vicious dog. Its pathetic that people raise dogs to fight, because they can't fight each other themselves.

    This dog is a beautiful dog, protecting its owner with its life like any well trained dog would. Then only thing you city-slickers know about is dog fighting, therefor they are very vicious (not all of them are fighting dogs, anyway, but you can tell when they are because they are overly aggressive to anything even their own trainer (and the "trainer" usually abuses these animals so the animal thinks that it has to protect itself from everything).

    Therefor, the city-lamers had to make a law against it which is the only thing they can do. But seriously, they don't go to the root of the problem and crack down on dog fights, they ban the dog.

    That is as retarded as the city, the city "officials" and everything else the city spews.

    It is just another blind "solution" that is actually just making more of a problem then providing a solution.

    Therefor, do not target the dog, target the "trainers".

    This is a great dog. If trained correctly any dog can be unleashed but will stay near the owner, because the dog knows that the owner is his friend. Not only that, but he will follow commands too.
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rooster
    I'm not even going to bother reading the rest of this post before I tell you to shut your suck-hole and get a life. People like "your mon" scare me on the roads and highways, but nobody's is banning her from driving. Get your panties out of a ball, go back to your sanitized idiot-proof hyper-sensitive world , and let the man and his best friend enjoy themselves.

    Excuse me, I need to go back and catch up on all the stories I've been reading about vicious mountain biking dog attacks. Skrew you.
    Way to tell it like it is.

    It's those unleashed Cocker Spaniels that concern me - those things are vicious little monsters - and don't get me started on those Pekingese, I still have a scar on my lip from one of those things biting me when I was 10.
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  29. #29
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    Great Dog you have there! Hope you gave him an extra scooby snack when you got home.

    As for as "banning the breed", that's a load of Sh1t! My buddy's daughter has a pit. friendlist dog I've ever met. He'll lick you to death before he ever bits you. You should see him tuck that tail between his leg when she catches him doing something he knows he shouldn't!

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    blame it on the city?

    I am redneck and hillbilly. My family are farmers and raise beef for a living. I understand animals pretty well. I am no "city-lamer" whatever that is supposed to mean. I love dogs, too.

    I guess you think that the generations of Pits that have been bred for their strength and aggressiveness have had no effect on the general temperament and tendencies of the breed. Yeah, right. And I guess that Jack Russels don't really like to bark, and Bloodhounds don't like to track scents, and Retrievers don't really like to fetch naturally, either. Whatever.

    It is very convenient (and lame) to blame it on the media, the politicians, and the inner-city dwellers so you don't have to feel any responsibility for the reputation of the breed of dog you choose to own. Don't get your feelings hurt and get defensive everytime someone reminds you that you have a dog that isn't known as a "model citizen".

  31. #31
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    I was on that very trail about 12:30/1:00 yesterday afternoon. I was thinking to myself, "you know renegade, there is not much traffic on this trail [I'm riding alone, with no dog!], you sure don't want to get hurt out here, no one will find your remains for weeks".
    Very cool trail too.
    ****

  32. #32
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    Beautiful dog davec113, and know he's game, which makes him even better! I have no problems with dogs of leash, but then I've never been attacked by one.

  33. #33
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    pics of my pit sharpei

    this guy IS the nicest, friendiest dog I've ever met. The spca cuddled him for the first two months of his life(born there), socializing him, etc. Nuture trumps nature in most cases(IMO)



    he did kill a chipmonk once

  34. #34
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    I have to agree that if I come across ANY unleashed dog that I don't know personally, I am very aware that I may encounter a dangerous dog. My personal experience has been that ANY dog can pose a significant threat regardless of the breed.

    I also can't argue that SOME people, NOT ALL PEOPLE, choose to foster the aggressive nature of certain fighting breeds. I CAN provide my personal experience (that's what we do on this site) that would refute the belief that ALL Pit Bulls are bad, even when raised by thugs wanting them to fight. We rescued Pit Bull that was raised as a fighter (scars on face, ears cut completely off). She may look dangerous, but she is one of the sweetest dogs I have ever owned. She hasn't met a single person she doesn't like, including children. EVEN in situations where you might expect aggression from a fighting dog.

    If we are going to talk about danger, let us talk about danger statistics:

    Number of murders in 2003 and 2004.
    2003 1,383,676
    2004 1,367,009

    Somebody please show me statistics that suggest pit bull and other breeds are more dangerous than the species causing the above listed statistics.
    It is difficult for some people to use the two words "too" and "to" appropriately.

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  35. #35
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    Just curious what trail you were riding in the front range? I've never seen a moose around these parts, much less a huge bull.

  36. #36
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    Awesome story Davec113. That only speaks well for you as well. I know that dogs will lay lay down their life for their owners, but it's not everyday that you'll have one lunging at a beast as big as a moose. You must be proud. That's sheer devotion between you two. Stories like that makes me want to go adopt a good dog myself (were it not for our spoiled cat).
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by indy dog
    Just curious what trail you were riding in the front range? I've never seen a moose around these parts, much less a huge bull.
    The wapiti and baptiste trails are secondary trails that flow off of the northern sourdough trail. There is a large moose population that resides in the grandby area; these moose pop over the divide once in a while during the summer. I saw one at west magnolia several years ago; folks thought I was full of sh*t when I spoke about it. Then 3 days later the same moose walked through downtown Nederland, and I was vindicated.
    ****

  38. #38
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    The dog hater must be from the South. I've been on rides down there, and thought I was going to be eaten by the random dogs roaming the trail. This is because they're raised as hunting dogs, not pets. I'm a total dog lover, and I was shocked how some people treat, and raise, their dogs. When some of these foks are "done" with their dog, they just ditch them in the woods! Definitely not pets. It's a little different in some areas. I disagree with the Pit overreaction, by the way. Any dog can be raised to be vicious or sweet. Ever seen a pack of beagles tear up a rabbit?

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by heavyg


    Pit bull owners are quick to talk about how their dogs get a bad rap because people don't "raise them correctly". That's BS. Dogs that are bred primarily for fighting and have a long "rap sheet" of violent maimings and outright murder cannot blame their tendencies on "bad owners" and expect people to buy it. Show me the last golden retriever that seriously injured someone or killed a child.
    Actually, its not the dogs that are bred for fighting, hunting, or herding that are the issue with this breed. Its the Pits that are bred for looks, and the Pits that are bred as guard dogs that are the problem. The fighting dogs are actually some of the best dogs around people and kids, and are not necessarily dog aggressive either. Fighting dogs that show any aggression towards people are culled for obvious reasons, but the people that want guard dogs encourage this trait, and people breeding for looks sometimes overlook this because their priorities are wrong. Like many breeds, recent irresponsible breeding has damaged the integrity of the breed. Just like German Shepherds have been bred disregarding health and temperament, Pits have been bred by irresponsible people too. So yes, dangerous Pits do exist that have temperaments that would never have been produced by a responsible Pit Bull breeder.

    Quote Originally Posted by heavyg
    Pit Bull owners buy these dogs and then spend the rest of their lives trying to convince everyone in the world that they're truly sweet and loving at heart and incapable of violence. Why bother? If you want to have a dog for self-defense or because he looks tough or whatever, that's fine. But understand that you will be responsible for keeping that animal in check and don't expect anybody to cut you much slack when you try to bend the rules.
    I don't know of other Pit Bull owners that will say their dog is incapable of violence, thats rediculous. Pit owners do often try to educate people about misconceptions that have been propigated through sensationalized media events. Most of these "Pit Bull Attacks" that have been recorded by the media have NOT been perpitrated by a pure American Pit Bull Terrier, it just makes the story news worthy to report the strory this way. Pit Bull crosses are not the same dog, some can be much more dangerous when mixed with guard dog breeds, and identifying a Pit Bull isn't as easy as you might think:

    http://members.aol.com/radogz/find.html

    http://www.understand-a-bull.com/Fin...itbull_v3.html
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  40. #40
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    For those who live around moose, what are you supposed to do when one of them confronts you? I know they are unpredictable and will trample people, especially Bulls. Apparently its rare to survive a moose trampling, I'm sure glad the moose decided not to try to chase us down!
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  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by davec113
    For those who live around moose, what are you supposed to do when one of them confronts you? I know they are unpredictable and will trample people, especially Bulls. Apparently its rare to survive a moose trampling, I'm sure glad the moose decided not to try to chase us down!
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  42. #42
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    The leash law here states that your dog must be under your control. I have trained mine to heel without a leash. I don't have any concern about her being off leash. She would never bite anyone any-dog or otherwise. She got run over by a bike once and is spooked by bikes so she doesn't do the off road thing anymore sadly.
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  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by davec113
    For those who live around moose, what are you supposed to do when one of them confronts you? I know they are unpredictable and will trample people, especially Bulls. Apparently its rare to survive a moose trampling, I'm sure glad the moose decided not to try to chase us down!
    I went to college in Pocatello Idaho (Idaho native) and spent much time in the Tetons skiing and mountaineering. Everything we learned was to avoid them at all costs - run away, get up a tree, big rocks, etc.

    During the winter of 1972,I watched a bull moose that was standing in the road outside Jackson Hole get annoyed at in idiot in an old VW bug. The guy kept honking at the moose. The moose turned and charged and then methodically made that veedub about 1/2 size as he pounded it from all sides. The guy was scrunched up in the middle, terrified. I was in a VW bus about 6 cars and 100 feet behind, heading north toward Jenny Lake for some xc skiing.

    After about 45 minutes of methodically charging the VW, the moose sauntered off into the woods. The fire department and sheriff had been summoned right after the first moose charge on the VW, and they sat and watched with the rest of us. When the moose finally left, they drove up and extricated the guy from his pulverized mass of metal, and waved the rest of us around. It made the cover of the Jackson Hole newspaper that week. Knowing the sherrif, I'm sure the guy got an earful, and learned his lesson about honking at a moose from 20 feet away.....
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  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by lobolator
    Makes me wish I could've rescued a cute pit pup from the pound years ago, guess I'll have to head to the pound soon and find another to adopt.
    Yep, we saved a pit off the streets about 7 years ago. She's a sweetheart and as has already been mentioned on this derailed thread, she'll lick someone to death before she bites them. With that said, here's my take at further derailing this thread (because it's monday and I don't feel like working):

    To me, owning a dog is like owning a gun. There is a lot of responsibility a gun owner needs to take, and more so with guns that have greater potential for harm. For example, any gun could be pointed at someone and fired, whether it's a bb gun or a shotgun. Both are going to hurt like hell, but the shotgun has a much, much greater potential of killing you then the bb gun, and as such, the owner of a shotgun has a much greater responsibility to protect the innocent from this potential. This rational should be applied to dogs as well. All dogs can bite and harm other dogs/people/etc., however, Pits have a much greater potential of causing damage then a shepard/retriever/spaniel/etc., because of the physical features that they have been bread with. Because the potential for damage is higher, the owners of Pits and other similar breeds need to be that much more responsible with their furry friend.

    To those of you who fear the loose dog on the trail, let me remind/inform you that dogs are extremely sensative and can easily sense this frear/anger. By you haveing a fearfull attitude, you are helping create the situation you are trying to avoid. Get over your fear, greet the dog, drop down to their level and pet them, and you'll get nothing but licks and a wagging tail.

    BTW, great story and you have a beautiful dog. Here's a couple pics of my Pit from this weekend (yes contrary to what you may think, Pits can swim very well and love to retrieve)




  45. #45
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    i'm all for letting your dogs run free with ya. my dog always loved running thru the woods, along the trail with me. he was never happier. but...

    did i miss the part of the story in which the moose ATTACKED, thereby validating the statement of DEFENSE?

    from what i read, the moose was defending itself from what it could have only assumed to be a predator...
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  46. #46
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    Is it me or is Mitrovarr only *****ing about the dog. What about the Moose?? Why was he in the trial?? Who was holding him back??

    Oh, yeah this orginal post was about how my dog may have saved my live. And it turned into my "poor Mommy."

    Am i correct i saying your Mothers dog is the size of a cat. I hate to tell you that ain't a dog.

    Dude your just another person turning a good story into something else.

    Why don't we say for the safety of humans lets eliminate all animals larger then a squirrelfrom being in the woods. So we all have a safe place to ride.
    What goes up must come down

  47. #47
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    Most of these "Pit Bull Attacks" that have been recorded by the media have NOT been perpitrated by a pure American Pit Bull Terrier, it just makes the story news worthy to report the strory this way. Pit Bull crosses are not the same dog, some can be much more dangerous when mixed with guard dog breeds, and identifying a Pit Bull isn't as easy as you might think:
    What difference does that make? Is the general public supposed to be able to discern a mixed bull from a "true American Pit Bull" at 50 yards and thereby gain some sense of safety and security?

    To me, any pit bull-like dog I see off-leash is cause for paying attention and keeping on guard (at minimum). The block head and bulging muscles are usually enough to get an idea that it's a dog you wouldn't want to mess with. Your assurance that true APBTs are not problem dogs means very little to me and the rest of the general public.

    I particularly liked this "factoid" from your second link:

    "For hundreds of years Pit Bulls were bred to fight dogs, certain traits were bred into the bloodlines for that purpose; high pain tolerance, high prey drive, etc."

    Boy, that sure doesn't sound like the kind of dog that would be great roaming free in public and spending quality time with little kids.

    High pain tolerance? Sounds like a dog that could be kind of hard to defend yourself against, kick away, etc.

    High prey drive? I guess you would argue that the "prey" is other dogs and somehow that's OK. That seems to be the argument that the website espouses.

    Just face it, you have a breed that has been bred for violence. Maybe yours isn't violent (yet), maybe it is, but most of us don't care to try and figure out which category it falls in. Just keep it away from me and my kids, and quit whining when people tell you how they feel about the breed. My opinion on your dog's capability for violent behavior is every bit as valid as yours when meeting up in public open spaces. The difference is, I don't endanger you or your family in order to "prove" my side of the argument.

    Don't you even feel the slightest guilt when your dog scares/intimidates/ makes other people nervous? Or do you feel it "serves us right" for our lack of understanding of your OPINION on this breed?

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rez
    for the safety of humans lets eliminate all animals larger then a squirrelfrom being in the woods
    Still not safe enough, need to eliminate all life other than human...... (/tongue in cheek)
    http://www.chainreaction.com/squirrels.htm
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  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by mfisher1971
    i'm all for letting your dogs run free with ya. my dog always loved running thru the woods, along the trail with me. he was never happier. but...

    did i miss the part of the story in which the moose ATTACKED, thereby validating the statement of DEFENSE?

    from what i read, the moose was defending itself from what it could have only assumed to be a predator...
    The moose crashed out of the woods and onto the trail directly in front of me, then turned to face me from 20-30 ft away. Clearly he was in a defensive posture

    Do you know anything at all about moose? They're agressive toward people and dogs, and will happily trample you to death if you annoy them. My dog might have saved my life.

    Did you even read my original post? I'll refrain from calling you retarded this time
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  50. #50
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    Dave,
    Nice post. Give the dog a biscutt and a pat on the back for me.

    Next time instead of having the dog save you. Bring a flying squirrel, I understand that moose and squirrrels are great friends.
    What goes up must come down

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