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  1. #1
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    Lardification Of America --

    Lardification . . .

    The federal agencies who keep track of this stuff in the US just released this item:

    In 1985 no state in the union had a 20% portion of their population who was clinically obese. Clinically Obese is defined as a BMI (Body Mass Index) above 30.

    Body mass index is defined as the individual's body weight divided by the square of his or her height.

    Now, in 2011, only one state has less than 20% of their population who is clinically obese. That state is Colorado at 19.88%.

    Maximum weight capacity on household bathroom scales used to be 250 lbs. -- back in 1975. Then it went to 300 lbs. Currently, standard max. capacity for household bathroom scales is 400 lbs.

    Heart disease, due largely to being overweight, is the number one cause of death in the US, followed closely by smoking.

    -- discuss . . .
    Si vis pacem, para bellum.

  2. #2
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    I work at a restaurant in Vegas and am constantly disgusted by our patrons. One time I had a guy sit down at my table, the guy was easily over 300lbs, he was wheezing and out of breath. He says to me "im really thirsty can you please get me a banana milkshake". I went into the kitchen and nearly puked from laughing so much. Sad state of affairs though with this country for sure.

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    It was inevitable, (as with many other issues that this country faces) given our immense wealth and overabundance of everything.

    I find that being disgusted by overweight people accomplishes nothing though.

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    Heaven forbid you actually discuss this in public. The mere topic of obesity ranks up there with politics and religion as a taboo conversation to have.

    Having so many fatties lumbering around has made it socially acceptable to be eat yourself to death.

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    shocking...but I've got to say BMI is kind of BS as far as assessing a person's fitness

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spindelatron View Post
    shocking...but I've got to say BMI is kind of BS as far as assessing a person's fitness
    Except for sumo wrestling, I think it is a pretty good measure. Look at people that are at the "top of their game" in sports and competition. I think you'll find the results fairly consistant. I thought I was just a big "bigger" and thicker than most, not fat, able to ride many hours and power up crazy climbs, but now I'm nearly 50lbs lighter and I can do even more amazing stuff. It made a huge difference.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  7. #7
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    was your BMI above 30 before?

    so does that mean 80% of Colorado is "at the top of their game"

  8. #8
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    Interesting, it has become increasingly obvious but I just wonder where they get this info? Myself, my family or anyone I know for that matter has never been tested for body fat content?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pathogenic View Post
    Having so many fatties lumbering around has made it socially acceptable to be eat yourself to death.
    Using pejorative language accomplishes nothing. Just as calling gay people "faggots" and African American people "n******," calling overweight people "fatties" is pointless, counterproductive and, quite frankly, not acceptable in a society that preaches equality and justice for all.

    And yes, it has become somewhat "socially acceptable to eat [oneself] to death," however that is not due to "having so many fatties lumbering around." Having so many "fatties" in this society is merely a symptom of the social acceptability to "eat [oneself] to death."

  10. #10
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    Sheeeesh, thats what's wrong with this country today, nobody can take an insult anymore. Everybody's so damn sensitive, "Hit em with your purse Alice!!!"

  11. #11
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    I see plenty of over weight people in Denver. But its still far fewer then my native Chicago. In my experience there are far fewer over weight people in ski towns where an active lifestyle predominates.

    At the hospital where I work in the IT department we were asked to stop referring to the laptops nurses use as COWs (computers on wheels) because it could offend a patient if you were over heard saying something like, "Boy that COW is being a pain in the a**."

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2wheelsnotfour View Post
    I see plenty of over weight people in Denver. But its still far fewer then my native Chicago. In my experience there are far fewer over weight people in ski towns where an active lifestyle predominates.

    At the hospital where I work in the IT department we were asked to stop referring to the laptops nurses use as COWs (computers on wheels) because it could offend a patient if you were over heard saying something like, "Boy that COW is being a pain in the a**."
    lol, you could call them Computers on Castors (CoCs)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spindelatron View Post
    shocking...but I've got to say BMI is kind of BS as far as assessing a person's fitness
    But then again, since it's not meant to asses fitness who really cares if it's "BS as far as assessing a person's fitness"?

    BMI is based on averages, to give you a baseline to know that you probably need to assess your body composition.

    If you have a high BMI because you're an elite athlete with a lot of lean muscle . . . fine. But if you're 50% body fat, you might want to make some lifestyle changes.

    The problem is, especially now that in U.S. society being overweight is becoming the norm, many people who have high body fat do not perceive themselves as being overweight. Calculating BMI is easy, so if you have a BMI over 30 you have something concrete to tell you that you need an honest assessment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mechanizedDNA View Post
    Sheeeesh, thats what's wrong with this country today, nobody can take an insult anymore. Everybody's so damn sensitive, "Hit em with your purse Alice!!!"
    I can take an insult. I just laugh 'em off. What I am saying is that it's really just an unnecessary waste of energy to insult people. It accomplishes literally nothing. It's an apathetic response to a problem. That is what is wrong with this country.

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    I look around here in Mass and can't believe we're a lean state. I think mass was ranked 47 fattest

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    Obviously, there are going to be a lot more overweight people if roughly 1/3 of the population is obese. One would expect that at least 1/3, although I would bet it is slightly higher, of people are overweight. I would expect that 25-27% of people are actually at an ideal weight. BMI is an ok tool to determine obesity. I would agree that it probably isn't suited for NFL players, or other elite, strength based athletes.

    If we are going to overcome this issue, there are many things that need to be addressed. First, it is something that needs to be publicly addressed. The is a large cost associated with obesity in human and fiscal terms. However, there is a fine line here. Did anyone see the Yoplait commercial with the blonde girl who was debating about eating a slice of cheesecake? It was basically pulled since it promoted the thinking associated with having an eating disorder, which was the justification about why it is ok to eat something, or ways to compensate when you eat something "bad."

    Portion control and the number of times a person eats per day is another. There is a lot of conflicting information. Recently, a study looked at the way people eat and found that people in the US now eat close to 5 meals per day. This is up from about 3.5 meals 40 years ago. That means people are snacking more between meals. Yet, many diet plans encourage people to eat every 3-4 hours. The downside is that we eat all the time and we get used to the function of eating, rather than eating when we are actually hungry. We can have huge portions, but then we must stop snacking, or one can have small portions and eat constantly. Either way, one seriously needs to monitor calories in. Forget the whole calories from fat, or from protein, etc. That is too complicated. If people would measure out a serving size and try to stick to 2000 calories a day, they would be much less likely to become obese.

    Another concern is the work schedule in the US. If you are a salaried employee, I doubt you work a 40 hour week. Two of the last three positions I have held have been salary based and I've averaged 60+ hours per week, minimum. When I was an hourly employee, I worked three jobs to cover the bills and ended up working well over 60 hours a week then, too. This leaves little time for exercise. The downside for employers is that many will end up picking of the bulk of the cost of health insurance for obese and overweight employees. This is going to lead to increased cost for the company and employees. Even if you provide workout facilities, some employees may not be able to leave their work long enough to use such a facility. Other employers prefer that you utilized the facilities on your own time, but the again when you work 60 hours a week and have a family, when do you have time?

  17. #17
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    I am fortunate that my job is so physical that I can eat fairly casually. Mountain biking isn't even really a fitness thing for me, it's more a fun thing. I am at target heart rate several times a day, it' s one long 12 hour interval training event day after day. I don't eat much, a bowl of Honey Nut Cheerios for breakfast, a couple of peanut butter & honey on wheat bread sandwiches for lunch and whatever I want for dinner. I range from 200 to 210 pounds at 5' 9". I don't do as much physical work in the winter for the gullet pudge kicks in but I usually have that burned off by summer. I always build muscle mass just from the day to day grind.

  18. #18
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    I'm 135 soaking wet, and have been since High School. I did absolutely nothing for it, it's in my genes.

    Maybe some of these "fatties" simply have a larger body type ?

  19. #19
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    This is a topic I have followed closely for decades. Most of my family is obese. One is morbidly obese.

    Did you know the CDC has added a new category, super morbidly obese. A BMI of over 45 or 50. Almost 20 years ago, it was reported there were over one million 400 pounders in the U.S. Today it is likely a much greater number.

    Frontline did a great show on obesity many years back. I think the CDC began tracking obesity in 1982. They showed a map of the U.S., showing one state shaded in pink, representing a population with a BMI over 20. In the following years, all states turned pink, except Colorado, and most states gradually were shaded red, meaning their population exceeded 25. Now Mississippi leads the pack, with 34% of it's population obese. If you look at the past trend, you can predict that in a few short years, 50% of the U.S. will be obese, along with rising numbers of morbid and super morbidly obese.


    There have been heated debates about health care in the U.S. Many feel it is a right for all Americans. Do they fully understand that 75% of health care costs go to treat obesity and smoking related illnesses. That percentage will only grow, as more people choose to harm their health. This effects us all. Medicare, medicaid and SS recipients all take out much more than they contribute. As more and more people have to be treated and given SS disability payments at earlier and earlier ages, it will shorten the life of those entitlement programs, or cause them to go completely broke.

    Harsh language or insults to those causing this to happen, will not solve the problem, but people better not be afraid to confront the people and the issue, before it's too late, and even the healthy folks lose out on SS and medicare.

  20. #20
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    I've been trying to quit smoking for a while because I know it is bad for me and I won't do my family any good if I am dead, but a few know it all guys at work have really been giving me **** about how bad it is for me and basically just piss me off every time I try to take a smoke break. Both are pretty overweight and one is WAY overweight, well north of 300 lbs and had to have knee replacement surgery. After a few weeks of him bothering me, I finally had enough. I asked him if he thought weighing twice as much as he needed to was any healthier. He was a little stunned. People easily recognize smoking as bad, but don't pay much attention to the fact that they are 400 lbs and have diabetes as a result. Hopefully I will be off the smoking wagon soon and can keep my weight down, less I turn into a fat ass and trade one bad thing for another.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllisonWunderland View Post
    Lardification . . .

    Now, in 2011, only one state has less than 20% of their population who is clinically obese. That state is Colorado at 19.88%.

    Maximum weight capacity on household bathroom scales used to be 250 lbs. -- back in 1975. Then it went to 300 lbs. Currently, standard max. capacity for household bathroom scales is 400 lbs.

    -- discuss . . .
    And at any time, 80% of the 20%+ from any given state who are clinically obese can be found in a Walmart parking lot. What a sad trend...
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  22. #22
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    Fat people are disgusting.

    /thread.

    You in Oklahoma City? If yes, come ride with us.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by old'skool View Post
    Maybe some of these "fatties" simply have a larger body type ?
    True, some do. But when I see friends and acquaintances who were thinner and healthier back in HS and college (25-30 years ago for me) who are now packing the double chins, beer guts and muffin tops and look 20 years older than they are, likely has more to do with life choices (poor choices regarding health) than body type.
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  24. #24
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    Growing up in a Bay Area suburb, I never really saw many fat people. I'm not sure why, but a lot of the people walking around the local Safeways and the malls and everything are kinda alright, mostly a bit overweight, but not obese. (I'm sitting here with a glass of milk and a brownie for lunch.)

    I went up to Reno a few weeks ago for college orientation. My parents and I were eating dinner in one of the "restaurants" in the hotel/casino we were staying. It got to the point where my parents started having a competition to see who could count the most fat people. It was horrifyingly gross.
    Sometimes, I question the value of my content.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by mechanizedDNA View Post
    Interesting, it has become increasingly obvious but I just wonder where they get this info? Myself, my family or anyone I know for that matter has never been tested for body fat content?
    Well . . .

    I get medical care through the VA. VA records my weight, knows my height, and all the records go into a federal data base that tracks veterans and their health.

    Any doctor does pretty much the same thing.

    BMI and predisposition for obesity is about 80% genetic.
    Si vis pacem, para bellum.

  26. #26
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    I range from 200 to 210 pounds at 5' 9".
    You're in the same boat as me . . . I'm 5' 10" and about 220, down from about 260, and much, much fitter, more active.

    http://www.bmi-calculator.net/

    Nonetheless -- BMI for 5' 9" is 29.53 (200 lbs.) and 31.01 borderline clinically obese.

    I'm over the top, (31.56) but headed down . . . and very fit for 63 yrs old, good muscle tone, heart rate and endurance. Diabetes numbers, blood pressure, and cholesterol are under control. I could stand to be 165 lbs -- 45 lbs. less than I weigh. Haven't been in that range since about 1988.
    Si vis pacem, para bellum.

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    Being 6'3 and 175lbs for pretty much the past 15 years of my life (currently 31) I have trouble relating to this subject on a personal level. My entire mom's side of the family is filled with endurance athletes, college athletes and recreational athletes... there isn't one person in our 31 family members that I would say is overweight. My grandparents are to thank, they are 83 and 79 and still get out everyday to ride their bikes, play tennis or golf. Physical fitness was a staple in their lives that was passed down the family tree.

    I look at my friends from high school and college and am just amazed. Guys I played high school and college basketball with, high school baseball with and used to ride with are huge. It saddens me and short of the occasional beer belly jokes someone drops, no one brings it up. I know they are all aware, but they just don't care enough about their family (or themselves) to do anything about it.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nenbran View Post
    It was inevitable, (as with many other issues that this country faces) given our immense wealth and overabundance of everything.
    While that is somewhat true, I think that sounds to much like an excuse, it`s our own responsibility to take care of ourselves.

  29. #29
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    Body mass index is 80% genetic.

    This is the hard science. That said, the American diet is out of control.
    Si vis pacem, para bellum.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spindelatron View Post
    shocking...but I've got to say BMI is kind of BS as far as assessing a person's fitness
    This is true, it is not too useful for individuals.

    It IS, however, useful for looking at larger populations and trends.

    I am a thick, stocky guy that puts on muscle easily, and I used to work construction and lift weights. I was told by one physician a few years ago that I was very overweight, based on my BMI. I had my bodyfat checked by the sports lab at Virginia Tech (a friend worked there) and it was 14.5%, putting me on the better end of "fit" for my age, approaching "athletic".

    Interestingly, in the 4 years since, as I have mostly stopped lifting weights and my construction years are farther behind me, I have lost around 15 lbs (lost 20, but put 5 back on this year), but I don't think my bodyfat fat has changed much. If anything it may have gone up a hair. But according to me BMI, I doing much better.

    So, in my case, a high BMI was due to working out in the gym and generally being muscular. However, if the BMI of an entire population goes up over time, it is not likely due to an wide increase of people working out in the gym or a genetic shift to being a more "stocky" build.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by mechanizedDNA View Post
    Interesting, it has become increasingly obvious but I just wonder where they get this info? Myself, my family or anyone I know for that matter has never been tested for body fat content?
    BMI is not the same thing as percentage body fat. BMI is determined by weight and height.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  32. #32
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    It's like people don't realize what the proper weight is. every time some lard ass comes to the clinic with knee, back, or hip px i tell them "hey this is why your knee hurts... and you should also consider losing some weight."
    i always get the same response "Whaaa?!"
    yes i said you are fat, your bone are same size as mine and you are twice the weight. Than we track their diet for a week and holy crap they eat like ****, they swear it is genetic but i know otherwise.
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllisonWunderland View Post
    Body mass index is 80% genetic.

    This is the hard science.
    I think you're mis-speaking. BMI is controlled by diet with genes as an underlying catalyst. I'd believe entirely that 80% of people have a gene for storing excess calories, it's an evolutionary left over.
    BMI is not genetic, it's the body's propensity to store fat that's genetic.
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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllisonWunderland View Post
    Body mass index is 80% genetic.

    This is the hard science. That said, the American diet is out of control.
    Genetics help determine your body type (endomorph, ectomorph, mesomorph or typically somewhere in between), but it doesn't matter if you're a 100% ectomorph - if you eat enough **** and exercise not at all, you can still become obese. Genetics are what they are, but we can alter our body fat content and thus our BMI. I honestly don't know what you mean when you say "BMI is 80% genetic," but since you say it's hard science I would love to see the study. Can you link me to it?

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllisonWunderland View Post

    BMI and predisposition for obesity is about 80% genetic.
    Im not looking to start a pissing match but I disagree with that. I think its more of bad eating habits, lack of eduction and inactive life styles being passed down from the parents rather than a glandular genetic issue. Sure hypothyroidism is or can be genetic and can contribute to obesity in the right environment but its not going to make you eat 8000 empty calories a day to gain 300 lbs. That argument is just a crutch and a excuse to not take care of yourself and eat right.
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllisonWunderland View Post
    That said, the American diet is out of control.
    The American take-a-car-everywhere lifestyle is equally to blame.

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    Overeating is, in my opinion, a sickness. Almost like an addiction. No one in their right mind eats until they weigh 300 lbs. Just as no one in their right mind drinks themselves out of a family and a job.

    But yeah, there are other factors. The media, over sized portions, lack of education, lack of exercise, processed food, fast food, etc etc.

  38. #38
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    Yesterday I racked up a $120.16 bill at a sushi bar here in San Jose (I gave a $32.00 tip, as the service and sushi quality was great). I ate it all to myself. For breakfast today I made carnitas with two fried eggs, six tostada shells, rice and black beans, cotija cheese, guacamole, and salsa fresca. For dinner tonight I will have 1/2 pound of pasta (uncooked weight), which I will be topping with a home made alfredo sauce (organic whipping cream and olive oil for the caloric win!!!). Oh, I do a lot of bike riding, without it I would surely be a fatass lardoturd.

    I do love a good eating challenge, not quite on the same parallel as Joey Chestnut (also from my area, San Jose), but every two months I do the 4 pound burger challenge at a Mendocino County eating establishment on the coast—I am going to be doing this again this coming Friday evening.

    I love food. Correction: I love good food. I will not lower myself to fast food, I would rather fast, or just drink beer instead. Come to think of it, I am struggling now trying to remember the last time I ate fast food, I think it may have been 1998 or thereabouts.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nenbran View Post
    Using pejorative language accomplishes nothing. Just as calling gay people "faggots" and African American people "n******," calling overweight people "fatties" is pointless, counterproductive and, quite frankly, not acceptable in a society that preaches equality and justice for all.
    Looks like we just found the fat, gay, black dude on the site.

    Sorry dude...that material was right over the plate...the joke had to be made.

    Back to the original topic...is there any hypothesis given in the article for WHY this shift toward obesity has occured?

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by stumblemumble View Post
    I think you're mis-speaking. BMI is controlled by diet with genes as an underlying catalyst. I'd believe entirely that 80% of people have a gene for storing excess calories, it's an evolutionary left over.
    BMI is not genetic, it's the body's propensity to store fat that's genetic.
    I remember back around 1970 and on when I worked with my dad he used to say how much larger the girls breasts were now then when he was young (born in 1920). I mentioned how much easier food was to get now. And he then said how he had noticed an increase in weight of people.

    Had an interesting talk with a customer (read milf). We are very open in talking. She has dated younger men ( read boys) and she says the younger guys just cant perform in the sack like her 40 and older men. Out of shape, no idea how to act, sloppy clothes,dirty, etc. She says the older guys will keep their weight and fitness good just to impress the girls. They have pride in themselves.

    My sister has her doctorate in anthropology and she agrees, and I do to, is a leftover thing from when we lived in the trees, the gene thing.

    I have noticed also when hiring a kid for boiler installs and such they got no balls. Their pinkeys are often curled when working in dirty conditions. Food is so easy right now. I am worried for many younger people (im 51) that the information on how to survive on your own grown or hunted food is lost. Like canning, etc. I will say doing so will reduce the overall weight of the population and better their health. The big food corps won't let that happen.

    We definitely have a different diet now then when I was young. I was replacing a domestic water pump for a customer last week. He is 63. Had a heart attack, unknown to him until a badly needed checkup. He asked me if I wanted some lunch from Stewarts ice cream and gas place. What the hell is there in Stewarts to eat for lunch? Never had lunch from a gas station before . Sorry to say I have had lunch from Stewerts now. They have hot dogs, premade sandwiches, candy bars, some okay soups and chili. Very busy at the food area.

    Point is, although obscure, is we have a choice. Good, easy times brings certain issues that are different when times are hard. Most if us take the easy road when available. Not many take the correct road.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by bclagge View Post
    Edit: beat me to it by 1 minute!



    Genetics help determine your body type (endomorph, ectomorph, mesomorph or typically somewhere in between), but it doesn't matter if you're a 100% ectomorph - if you eat enough **** and exercise not at all, you can still become obese. Genetics are what they are, but we can alter our body fat content and thus our BMI. I honestly don't know what you mean when you say "BMI is 80% genetic," but since you say it's hard science I would love to see the study. Can you link me to it?
    I thought it was BS, so I Googled "body mass index 80%" and came up with this study as the first hit. The abstract looks plausible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by muddytire View Post
    Looks like we just found the fat, gay, black dude on the site.

    Sorry dude...that material was right over the plate...the joke had to be made.
    Haha I'm actually the exact opposite of the three. Skinny, straight, and white, (not that it would really matter). Just bothers me when people do nothing but insult others and use pejorative language constantly. It is tiring. It is pointless. It is apathetic.

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    Quote Originally Posted by acer66 View Post
    While that is somewhat true, I think that sounds to much like an excuse, it`s our own responsibility to take care of ourselves.
    I can understand your point of view. I actually agree with it. Your life is what you make it. I was merely stating that when a society lives in such overabundance for so long, some problems are inevitable. We can't count on everyone to do what is best for themselves.

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    Quote Originally Posted by muddytire View Post
    Back to the original topic...is there any hypothesis given in the article for WHY this shift toward obesity has occured?
    Too many reason to list, some of which have been mentioned above. For me, I would say the main reason (not excuse, there is a difference) is the convenience of processed food. With both parents working and kids that have soccer practice, gymnastics, music lessons, etc. 3-4 nights a week, there is very little time to prepare and eat a proper meals. Plus, I would find myself eating at dinner at 8:30-9pm because I would go straight from work to practice. Once again, that is not an excuse, I know ultimately it was my fault that I gained the weight.

    That said, basing anything other than society-wide statistics BMI is not good. But I can see some insurance companies and/or the government putting a standard in place based on BMI, which would be a mistake because it doesn't take into account body type.

    I ride about 100 miles/week and am dropping weight, but according the CDC's definition, a chain smoking, alcoholic with a good BMI would be healthier than me. I am 5'11" and when I was 20 I worked a physically demanding job and was riding 5-6 days a week. My body fat % was less than 14% and I weighed 195lbs. I was not lifting weights or doing anything to add muscle mass. That would have put my BMI at 27.2 - obese. To be considered "normal" I would need to be under 180lbs. Pretty sure I would be dying of cancer or something if I got under 180....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crazydad View Post
    I ride about 100 miles/week and am dropping weight, but according the CDC's definition, a chain smoking, alcoholic with a good BMI would be healthier than me. I am 5'11" and when I was 20 I worked a physically demanding job and was riding 5-6 days a week. My body fat % was less than 14% and I weighed 195lbs. I was not lifting weights or doing anything to add muscle mass. That would have put my BMI at 27.2 - obese. To be considered "normal" I would need to be under 180lbs. Pretty sure I would be dying of cancer or something if I got under 180....
    I try to do around 120 road miles and 40-50 mtb miles per week. That works out to three road rides and two or three mtb rides. I'm on summer break from school, and my most serious job starts tomorrow, when I'll be painting my grandmother's fence. I "get there sometime in the morning and leave when I'm tired," according to her. So hopefully I'll still get some riding in.

    Right now I'm 5'11" and 170 pounds. I'm trying to drop down to below 160 by the end of summer for riding and fitness reasons. I'm thinking about racing for my college team in the fall. I checked with an online calculator (linked from this forum, I think) and it says I'm around 9% body fat. But then my BMI works out to the upper 20s, and that's technically overweight. I wasn't around "back in the good ol' days" when "everyone was skinny and healthy," so I don't have anything against which I can compare my experience nowadays. The only comparison comes from when I went to the Basque country a few years ago, and everyone seemed fit there. They actually went outside to pass the time, and they were okay with walking all day. My host family didn't even have internet, and they only watched the TV at dinner, to catch up on news. The horrors.
    Sometimes, I question the value of my content.

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    Quote Originally Posted by womble View Post
    I thought it was BS, so I Googled "body mass index 80%" and came up with this study as the first hit. The abstract looks plausible.
    A bit of a technical read, but the gist of it was that BMI, as well as change in BMI over time, is a primarily heritable trait. It's not genetics that are turning this country into Land O' the Lard though - it's personal choice. Even those that have genetics against them can maintain a healthy body weight, or at least a healthy level of fitness, they just have to make different choices.

    I'm going to go eat breakfast now. Oatmeal, blueberries and 2 eggs. Later for lunch I'm going to have Greek yogurt, cashews, carrots and a whole grain roll. Dinner - tilapia, brown rice vegetable sushi and cashews. Before I go to bed I'll have low fat cottage cheese as a snack.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nenbran View Post
    It was inevitable, (as with many other issues that this country faces) given our immense wealth and overabundance of everything.

    I find that being disgusted by overweight people accomplishes nothing though.
    Except that obesity disproportionally effects poor people. The availability of cheap processed food which is very unhealthy contributes a lot. There is a lot of literature coming out right now about the increase in obesity in third world countries as processed food becomes available. With obesity comes diabetes, heart disease, stroke, etc. which leads to huge health care costs.

    Since much of this problem effects a population which is unlikely to have health insurance, the conditions go untreated until they are acute and require hospitalization. Since they are poor with no insurance they can't pay the hospital, and so the really expensive care must be distributed among those who do. This is why we need some system to provide health care for the poor. They will end up at the Dr. either way, and the Dr.'s and hospitals will make their money either way. The only choice is whether we, as a society, spend a little or a lot in treating their problems.


    Quote Originally Posted by muddytire
    Back to the original topic...is there any hypothesis given in the article for WHY this shift toward obesity has occured?
    Subsidies for corn and sugar play a huge part. Most processed food is corn based. Cheap meat is raised on subsidized corn. Do away with the corn subsidies and the fast food business model lo longer works. If we instead spent that money subsidizing vegetables and healthy meat, people would start eating healthier purely out of economics.

    The problem is that both the corn and sugar industry are huge and spend lots of money on lobbyists every year in order keep their tax-funded cash cow going. Also, if all the fast food places go out of business, there will be a huge increase in the number of unskilled workers in need of employment.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogbrain View Post
    Except that obesity disproportionally effects poor people. The availability of cheap processed food which is very unhealthy contributes a lot. There is a lot of literature coming out right now about the increase in obesity in third world countries as processed food becomes available. With obesity comes diabetes, heart disease, stroke, etc. which leads to huge health care costs.
    Very true. However, you must account for what led to the mass production of processed food...

    EDIT: You must also account for what led to the massive class division.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nenbran View Post
    Very true. However, you must account for what led to the mass production of processed food...

    EDIT: You must also account for what led to the massive class division.
    What led to mass processed food and massive class division can be summed up by one work: money.

    Without a profit (money), no food processing company is gonna make processed food. But then the question becomes, if the poor don't have money, then what other food choices do they have other than cheap processed food?

    I don't know what the answer is, but class division has always been with human and it looks like humans are more greedy than we like to admit. There is no answer here. Only in utopia.

    However, it's not just the processed food. It's also the fast food chain restaurant. The only mom-n-pop restaurant nowadays are boutique-ish shop. All the KFCs, McDs, Burger Kings,, etc.. have taken over America couple decades ago.

    OK how about have the government, instead of giving money to the military, give money to the poor (in the form of food stamps) and mandate them eat healthy food? Wouldn't this alleviate the healthcare issue in the long term? But now we're getting into politics, so it's probably not gonna happen.

    But one this for sure, Americans are lazy to cook now, rich or poor. Just too damn lazy.

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