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  1. #1
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    Holster product review

    Because this question has been brought up in the past and is relevant to some cyclists interests so I think a write up here is in order.

    *DISCLAIMER* This thread is NOT intended to be a flame-fest on your opinion on gun control. Whether you’re for or against it, we all know your opinion. There have been multiple threads on this issue. If you would like to voice your opinion on it, use the search function and post it in one of the other threads, start your own thread or go to F88me.com and hash it out there. I will ask that the Moderators please delete ANY political opinions concerning gun control, right to carry and just any comments in general that is flaming or flame bait. Again, this thread is to be a product review no different than that of pedals, seatposts and jerseys. If you have something constructive to contribute to the thread, by all means please post.

    As an avid jogger and cyclist, I, like many of you, have wondered about how to carry while jogging and cycling. That being the case, I was surfing the ‘net when I came across Pistol Wear’s website and was impressed with what I saw. But before I go ordering one of these things I did a little Googling to see what kind of reviews were out there and they seemed to have a pretty positive rating among those who have them. So I ordered one.

    When I carry, it’s usually a Kel-Tec .380. I wanted something small and light and it was highly recommended to me by a number of gun enthusiasts I know. Even with it being a small, lightweight pistol, I was worried about contact with my sweaty skin. I really hate the idea of a fanny pack as that just screams “GUN!!!” on an adult male and while I do have a CamelBak *fanny version* that I use when jogging, I only use it when it’s really hot out and only when working out. A normal inside waist band (polyester) simply soaks up sweat and doesn’t fully protect the exposed part of the pistol. Forget shoulder carry. Don’t even want to think of the chaffing issues there.

    So I order Pistol Wear’s Trump Card holster and their PT-2 holster. The PT-2 is on back order and I should have it at the end of the month. I’ll post a follow up then. When I ordered the Trump, I selected free shipping and had it in a few days. Also received an email when it shipped along with a tracking number.

    The Trump was packaged in a large ziplock and had directions printed out on a normal printer that you would find in any office. I used it that evening for a 5 mile run. PW claims that no sweat will make contact with your gun. I sweat profusely so this was a concern. They were true to their word. When I got home and removed it, my pistol was dry. Hard to believe, but it’s true.

    The actual compartment for the pistol itself was easily large enough to accommodate my .380. Although the access hole appears to be a little on the small size if you have large hands but I plan to open it up a little. Anyone with minimal sewing skills can do that easily enough. I’ve done a few runs with it and you almost truly forget you even have it on you. It will move a little on you but not much and you can easily scoot it back and maybe tighten it up around your waist. It wraps around your waist as shown on the site and even has a belt loop to feed the other end through. It attaches via a large Velcro piece that has not loosened at all.

    I’ve had it on a few runs so far and have been very impressed with it. Even had it with a group run and no one noticed anything strange under my shirt and this thing hugs your body. Of course your choice of pistol and apparel will affect that. Ruger 45 and skin tight clothes? Someone will probably notice. For the record, I did try to put my Ruger P-90 into the pouch and it wouldn’t fit. Not that I would want to carry that heavy thing while running anyways but was curious

    I’ve not had a chance to mt bike with it yet but hope to do so this weekend. Given how well it’s performed so far, I don’t anticipate any problems with it. I would think it would be ideal for road riding since most roadie’s don’t wear a CamelBak. Mt biking with a CamelBak will present some access problems for the Trump holster but maybe not so much for the PT-2. If anyone tries one out, please post a write up on your experience.

    My overall impression is very good. The only real criticism I have beside the access issue is that there’s no small external pocket to place your DL and CCW permit in unless you wanted to carry it in the main pouch. When I tried that I found them getting in the way of my grabbing the pistol. In closing, I would have to give this a 8 and 1/2 out of 10 stars.

    Again, if anyone has one and would like to contribute, please do. Cyclists here have asked in the past how to carry while riding and I believe that this truly a good product for us. Thanks.

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    First , in before the move .

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    Is it as simple as just strapping it on? Or do you also need to take into account things like larger knicks sizing to accommodate the bigger balls you have when carrying?




    [sorry--I know you wanted to keep it as a straightforward review, but I couldn't help myself ]

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    Quote Originally Posted by crashedandburned
    I really hate the idea of a fanny pack as that just screams ďGUN!!!Ē
    Really? My fanny pack has never done that.

  5. #5
    RIS
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    We're talking about a 235 gram mouse gun with a trigger like an upholstery stapler, right?

    I always just stuck my P3AT in my pocket. My biggest concern was forgetting it and having it go through the laundry.

    I've carried a full-sized Glock for most of my adult life. My employer requires me to carry my issued .40 caliber model 22 at all times. I just use a $10 Glock "Sport/Combat" belt slide holster. I run with it, I mountain bike with it. It looks like this:



    I sweat buckets. If being in the ocean won't hurt the weapon, a little sweat isn't going to do anything to it.

    I'm about 5'10" and 185 pounds, and this holster makes a full-sized double-stack duty pistol disappear under a T-shirt.

    Wearing your primary pistol on your strong-side hip should always be your first choice. You'll be able to break leather and put rounds on target a whole heck of a lot faster than I'm guessing you could unwrap that diaper under stress.

    But hey, what do I know?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by RIS

    Wearing your primary pistol on your strong-side hip should always be your first choice.
    Are you implying that MTBing or jogging should involve not just primary, but also secondary (and possibly even tertiary or quaternary) pistols?

    Just clarifying .

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    Ah but you have the advantage of being a cop and having a badge should someone "notice" your gun. I don't and even if I did, I'm not looking to advertise. Granted, .380's are not very powerful but here's how I figure it. 1) It's better than nothing and it's easily concealable for something I'll most likely never use. 2) I do carry Fed Hydro-Shok ammo in it. 3) A laser sight on it *sighted in for about 25'-30'* has a nice physiological effect on people in explaining that shyt just got real should I actually ever need to pull it. So if I do need to use it, It's as ready as it's going to be and 3-7 rounds in a person, if it doesn't kill them, will give me nuff time to get away.


    Although, I've had my eye on a Glock 36 lately.

    BTW: Did you know that they actually make "Conceal Weapons Permit" badges? Ever run across one of those? I think carrying one of these is a bbbaaaaaddddd idea.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by disfocus
    Are you implying that MTBing or jogging should involve not just primary, but also secondary (and possibly even tertiary or quaternary) pistols?

    Just clarifying .
    Um, no. Not neccessarily. I only carry one (with 16 doses of felon repellent) when I ride or run. But thanks for asking.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by crashedandburned
    Ah but you have the advantage of being a cop and having a badge should someone "notice" your gun. I don't and even if I did, I'm not looking to advertise.
    I'm not kidding about the gun disappearing with the Glock holster above. I've carried my pistol in the open and had people not notice it even when wearing it out in the open, even when standing in a crowd, where people are free to observe me from every angle (imagine what you would see if the guy in the picture above had his right arm at his side). I went in to the station today, and hung around in a small room with half a dozen of my co-workers. When I lifted my shirt and took my pistol off, every one of them commented on the fact that they had no idea that I was carrying it there- and this is exprienced street cops that didn't spot a full-sized duty pistol.

    Granted, .380's are not very powerful but here's how I figure it. 1) It's better than nothing and it's easily concealable for something I'll most likely never use.
    Yeah, but my "mouse gun" comment was not meant to be derisive. I figured that you knew that the .380 is not a fight-stopper. But not many people realize that over 80% of handgun shooting victims survive- even the best pistol rounds are pretty weak.

    2) I do carry Fed Hydro-Shok ammo in it.
    Picking ammo for a .380 is not like picking ammo for larger handguns. Many/most .380 auto pistols are finicky eaters. 7 rounds of ball ammo on target is probably are better than one Hydra-Shok and an FTF (Failure To Feed) with the hollow-point bullet nose hung up on the bottom of the feed ramp. Find the best performing round that will 100% feed, 100% of the time. And by "performing", I mean in actual, documented, social use. Your life is worth more than to be risked "testing" exotic ammo.

    3) A laser sight on it *sighted in for about 25'-30'* has a nice physiological effect on people in explaining that shyt just got real should I actually ever need to pull it.
    I'll just come right out and say it: Get rid of that thing.

    Lasers work both ways. It makes you a target as much as it aids you in targeting. Realistic social uses of handguns is at arm's length at most. We're talking somewhere between point shooting and contact shooting.

    And even more important, it is good to remember the following (life and death stuff here): The "deterrent" value placed on things like lasers, the sound of a pump-action shotgun, or the menacing appearance of a particular firearm only applys to REASONABLE people. And if they were reasonable people, they wouldn't have done whatever it was that caused you to point your firearm at them in the first place. I've seen people fail to follow instructions issued by multiple uniformed police officers at gun point, under the direct threat of death. Your paradigm needs adjustment if you're going to survive an armed encounter.

    What you really need is a light. You have a moral and ethical responsibility to identify your target before you turn him off.

    So if I do need to use it, It's as ready as it's going to be and 3-7 rounds in a person, if it doesn't kill them, will give me nuff time to get away.
    You hope. Real life ain't like TV. 3-7 rounds of the very best .380 ammo may have absolutely no immediate result. When I carried my P3AT, it was with the complete understanding that I was probably going to have to empty it center mass and then go hand-to-hand until the bad guy bled out, unless I had a chance to bury the muzzle in his eye socket and pull the trigger.

    There's three ways to end that kind of a fight:

    1) Shut down the hydraulic system. That can take a while, depending on the mechanism of injury.

    2) Shut down the electrical system. That requires either an exceptional shot (which is unlikely under stress), or close proximity (which carries unreasonable risks).

    3) Shut down the structural support system (a pelvic shot). A difficult task with the limited horsepower of a handgun.

    Although, I've had my eye on a Glock 36 lately.
    That's a HUGE step in the right direction, although we need to keep the big picture in mind. A $200 Remington 870 12-guage pump is an absolute fight-stopper and an infinitely better fight-stopper than ANY handgun. The only reason we don't all carry long guns all the time, is because they are so big, that we would not be willing to carry them all of the time. The purpose of a hand gun is to fight your way to your long gun.

    The Glock 36 is new and trendy, but it's actual downsides are as follows:

    1) As a .45ACP, it has more recoil than a 9mm, so shot-to-shot recovery is going to be slower.

    2) As a single-stack weapon, it ain't really that much thinner than a regular double-stack Glock (only .05" thinner).

    3) It's only .08" shorter than a Glock 19, which holds 16 rounds with the standard magazine, and 18 rounds with the optional Glock factory +2 magazine. The Glock 36 holds 6+1 rounds. I own (and have carried on duty) a Glock 17 with Glock factory +2 magazines, and there is a lot to be said for only having to stop to "gas up" after 20 rounds.

    4) The Glock 36 is less than a quarter-inch shorter than the Glock 19, in terms of height. This is the most significant dimension as it relates to concealed carry, but a quarter-inch ain't much.

    5) In actual street shootings, the .45 ACP offers virtually no advantage over the 9mm. With the very best ammo in both calibers, roughly 95% of bad people stopped doing bad things after being administered one dose. BTW, only about 2 out of 3 bad people stopped doing bad things after one dose of the very best .380 ACP.

    BTW: Did you know that they actually make "Conceal Weapons Permit" badges? Ever run across one of those? I think carrying one of these is a bbbaaaaaddddd idea.
    I think your God-given self-preservation instincts are correct on this one.
    Last edited by RIS; 10-14-2010 at 09:42 PM.

  10. #10
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    I must say, it is nice to have a thread that is largely free of hoplophobes.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by RIS
    I'm not kidding about the gun disappearing with the Glock holster above. I've carried my pistol in the open and had people not notice it even when wearing it out in the open, even when standing in a crowd, where people are free to observe me from every angle (imagine what you would see if the guy in the picture above had his right arm at his side). I went in to the station today, and hung around in a small room with half a dozen of my co-workers. When I lifted my shirt and took my pistol off, every one of them commented on the fact that they had no idea that I was carrying it there- and this is exprienced street cops that didn't spot a full-sized duty pistol.
    Now thatís impressive. No one noticed? I admit that one of my fears is someone seeing my pistol on me and calling the cops. Not all cops are CCW friendly. Besides that I just donít like to advertise that I have one on me. Kinda a ďdonít ask, donít tellĒ sort of thing. Thatís the whole point ccw, isnít it?

    Quote Originally Posted by RIS
    Yeah, but my "mouse gun" comment was not meant to be derisive. I figured that you knew that the .380 is not a fight-stopper. But not many people realize that over 80% of handgun shooting victims survive- even the best pistol rounds are pretty weak.
    Yes. Iím aware that a .380 isnít the big gun that I personally would prefer to carry. Itís a balancing act. There are times that I do carry my .45 but again, thatís a big ol Ruger P-90. Heavy thing

    Quote Originally Posted by RIS
    Picking ammo for a .380 is not like picking ammo for larger handguns. Many/most .380 auto pistols are finicky eaters. 7 rounds of ball ammo on target is probably are better than one Hydra-Shok and an FTF (Failure To Feed) with the hollow-point bullet nose hung up on the bottom of the feed ramp. Find the best performing round that will 100% feed, 100% of the time. And by "performing", I mean in actual, documented, social use. Your life is worth more than to be risked "testing" exotic ammo.
    Yes. Hangup is definitely a concern of mine. I have, since Iíve bought the pistol, cycled a good number of hollow points through it. When I did come across the H-S ammo, Iíve cycled a few rounds of that as well and have not had a problem. I am a reloader and my father more into it than I am. He carries with some WICKED loads but I think the legal repercussions of using your own custom loads would be fierce. Imanage explaining to a jury as to your thinking behind loading double bullets (a flat nose and round ball behind that) in each round for self defense. Yes my dad has done this.



    Quote Originally Posted by ris
    I'll just come right out and say it: Get rid of that thing.

    Lasers work both ways. It makes you a target as much as it aids you in targeting. Realistic social uses of handguns is at arm's length at most. We're talking somewhere between point shooting and contact shooting.

    And even more important, it is good to remember the following (life and death stuff here): The "deterrent" value placed on things like lasers, the sound of a pump-action shotgun, or the menacing appearance of a particular firearm only applys to REASONABLE people. And if they were reasonable people, they wouldn't have done whatever it was that caused you to point your firearm at them in the first place. I've seen people fail to follow instructions issued by multiple uniformed police officers at gun point, under the direct threat of death. Your paradigm needs adjustment if you're going to survive an armed encounter.
    Sorry, have to disagree. Remember, my goal is to get away. Iím not looking to shoot from concealment. If I have to pull it, then the attacker is walking/ running over to me. I want to be able pull and put a dot him so that if I have to pull the trigger, I donít need to look down the sights. Now, my .45 does not have a laser on it. Itís what I have next to the bed. And I fully understand your perspective on this issue and respect that. Again, itís a balancing act for me. I donít go looking for trouble and if I saw a tweeker, Iíd just stay clear of them unless they forced me to shoot them.

    Quote Originally Posted by ris
    What you really need is a light. You have a moral and ethical responsibility to identify your target before you turn him off.
    Yes. I whole heartly agree. In WV, it you the responsibility to walk away from an encounter. I have a Mag light beside my bed but the local gun shop carries these and they come equipped with a NICE strobe feature. Except this shop wants $40.00 for these things.



    Quote Originally Posted by ris
    That's a HUGE step in the right direction, although we need to keep the big picture in mind. A $200 Remington 870 12-guage pump is an absolute fight-stopper and an infinitely better fight-stopper than ANY handgun. The only reason we don't all carry long guns all the time, is because they are so big, that we would not be willing to carry them all of the time. The purpose of a hand gun is to fight your way to your long gun.

    The Glock 36 is new and trendy, but it's actual downsides are as follows:

    1) As a .45ACP, it has more recoil than a 9mm, so shot-to-shot recovery is going to be slower.

    2) As a single-stack weapon, it ain't really that much thinner than a regular double-stack Glock (only .05" thinner).

    3) It's only .08" shorter than a Glock 19, which holds 16 rounds with the standard magazine, and 18 rounds with the optional Glock factory +2 magazine. The Glock 36 holds 6+1 rounds. I own (and have carried on duty) a Glock 17 with Glock factory +2 magazines, and there is a lot to be said for only having to stop to "gas up" after 20 rounds.

    4) The Glock 36 is less than a quarter-inch shorter than the Glock 19, in terms of height. This is the most significant dimension as it relates to concealed carry, but a quarter-inch ain't much.

    5) In actual street shootings, the .45 ACP offers virtually no advantage over the 9mm. With the very best ammo in both calibers, roughly 95% of bad people stopped doing bad things after being administered one dose. BTW, only about 2 out of 3 bad people stopped doing bad things after one dose of the very best .380 ACP.
    Thanks for the writeup. I want to run this by some people I know but this is interesting. Thank you for the advice.



    Quote Originally Posted by ris
    I think your God-given self-preservation instincts are correct on this one.
    I just couldnít believe that you could actually buy something like this but I guess I really shouldnít be surprised. *facepalm* Some people.

    BTW: wanna real laugh? Check out this moron. Heís the reason the rest of us have a bad name. Iíve done some googling on this guy when I first heard of him. He shouldnít have a gun IMHO.

    NASHVILLE ó A man who was detained for three hours while carrying an AK-47-style semiautomatic pistol at Radnor Lake State Park is suing the ranger who stopped him.
    Leonard Embody filed a lawsuit in federal court in Nashville on Monday. He claims Park Manager Steve Ward violated his civil rights by detaining him without probable cause and for longer than was necessary to determine he was not committing a crime.
    Embody has a handgun carry permit, and a new state law allows permit holders to carry their weapons in state parks. However, State Department of Environment and Conservation spokeswoman Tisha Calabrese-Benton has said Embody was detained because his weapon looked like a rifle and startled hikers had complained.
    Embody's attorney, Phillip Davidson, said the gun has the same "center operating parts" as an AK-47. It has a pistol grip and no shoulder stock.
    After Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco Firearms and Explosives personnel were called, Embody was released without charges.
    He has been detained briefly in several similar incidents ó at least three other times in state parks and once by police in the Nashville suburb of Belle Meade.
    Calabrese-Benton said the gun he carried at Radnor Lake on Dec. 20, 2009, had no stock and the barrel was under 11 inches. However, state attorneys were investigating whether it's legal to carry the AK-47-style pistol with 30-round magazine as a handgun. For unexplained reasons, it had an orange tip, like a toy weapon, although it was real.
    The lawsuit claims Ward knew Embody had a handgun carry permit before detaining him because Embody had already shown the permit to another ranger. It says Ward pointed a shotgun at Embody, forced him to lie on the ground and handcuffed him. When Metro Nashville Police arrived they asked Ward to release Embody, but he did not do so immediately, the lawsuit states.
    Embody seeks a jury trial and asks to be awarded an unspecified amount of compensatory damages for his injuries. The lawsuit claims Embody was "subjected to mental anguish, humiliation and embarrassment" because the incident was widely publicized in the local media.
    No answer to the claims had been filed in court by Wednesday. Calabrese-Benton said the state cannot comment on the lawsuit but is asking the Attorney General's office to represent Ward.
    Embody has been stopped at least four other times. Three times he was stopped while carrying a gun at Bicentennial Mall, a state park next to the Capitol in downtown Nashville, Calabrese-Benton said. He was released each time after a check of his handgun carry permit.
    Embody also was stopped on Jan. 23 by police in the Nashville suburb of Belle Meade while walking down Belle Meade Boulevard with a .44 caliber black powder revolver in his hand, Belle Meade Police Chief Tim Eads said.

    He was detained for about 16 minutes while officers checked his permit and weapon.
    Eads said he is a supporter of Second Amendment rights but called Embody's actions "reckless."
    Speaking of the lawsuit against Ward, Eads said, "I'm sure we'll be next."
    Embody's attorney, Davidson, said he had no comment on the other incidents. He said his client is not granting interviews.

    Quote Originally Posted by ris
    I must say, it is nice to have a thread that is largely free of hoplophobes.
    Yes it is. Have to admit that I had to look that word up.

  12. #12
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    I am our district's armorer (factory trained by Glock), and I've been carrying their weapons daily for more than 20 years. I've carried and used many weapons, including more Glock models than I could probably list off the top of my head, and they really make a lot of sense.

    Here's another option: The Glock 26.

    It's handy for states that limit civilian handgun magazines to 10 rounds, because it's the smallest Glock that takes a 10-round magazine.

    With 11 (10+1) rounds in a full-power handgun fighting caliber, you probably won't feel the need to carry a spare magazine. But if you do, it will accept any of the larger magazines in the same caliber, all the way up to the 33 round magazine from the Glock 18. The model 36 won't take any other magazine from any other weapon.

    The model 26 is almost half an inch shorter in length, it's over half an inch shorter in height, and it's only .05" wider than the model 36.

    And it's lighter.

    Just something to consider.

  13. #13
    RIS
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    I too had to look something up:



    I think it's kinda cute. I don't know about the mechanism of injury capability of the 7.62x39 round out of a 9.5" barrel, but it may still have some funtional purpose, as almost all 7.62x39 ammo is steel-cored and penetrates hard targets pretty well. They make a version for $349 that is legal in the People's Republic of Kalifornia.

    I'll bet they're freekin' loud, and I'll bet that the muzzle flash is about the size of a beach ball.

    I have no idea what to do for a holster. Maybe a laptop computer bag.

  14. #14
    RIS
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    Ewbank makes one with a 6" barrel:



    Definitely a laptop bag.

  15. #15
    RIS
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    As above, with a bayonet:



    Sorry for dragging your thread a little off topic.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RIS
    We're talking about a 235 gram mouse gun with a trigger like an upholstery stapler, right?

    I always just stuck my P3AT in my pocket. My biggest concern was forgetting it and having it go through the laundry.

    I've carried a full-sized Glock for most of my adult life. My employer requires me to carry my issued .40 caliber model 22 at all times. I just use a $10 Glock "Sport/Combat" belt slide holster. I run with it, I mountain bike with it. It looks like this:



    I sweat buckets. If being in the ocean won't hurt the weapon, a little sweat isn't going to do anything to it.

    I'm about 5'10" and 185 pounds, and this holster makes a full-sized double-stack duty pistol disappear under a T-shirt.

    Wearing your primary pistol on your strong-side hip should always be your first choice. You'll be able to break leather and put rounds on target a whole heck of a lot faster than I'm guessing you could unwrap that diaper under stress.

    But hey, what do I know?

    So I've got another question. Do you just walk around with your pistol like that with nothing more than your arm covering it? How do you carry when you run/ride?

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    Quote Originally Posted by crashedandburned
    So I've got another question. Do you just walk around with your pistol like that with nothing more than your arm covering it? How do you carry when you run/ride?
    I don't normally wear it like that- I chose that pic because it shows how it hugs the body. When I'm off-duty and wearing street clothes, I normally don't tuck the T-shirt in. But if I showed you a picture of that, you wouldn't be seeing anything.

    There are times when I will wear it like you see it above- when I'm out in the woods camping, when I'm inside my own house, when I'm walking the dog (I live on a private road).

    If I'm not on duty, but something happens right in front of me, and I either need to do something, or there is a good chance that I may have to, I'llpull the T-shirt up and tuck it between the pistol and my body (just the part on the right side- I leave the front/back/left hanging out, and it almost looks normal). This is not unique to cops. Lets say you're out on the interstate late at night, and your wife and/or kids have to pee really bad. There's only one rest stop for miles, but when you pull off, you find it completely vacant, except for a couple of goblins hanging out there for no apparent reason. Heck, depending on the circumstances, I might already have it in my hand, holding it behind my right leg (you can't out-draw a pistol that's already out).

    When I run, I just wear a belt over my shorts and under my T-shirt to support the holster. There are no belt loops on my shorts, but it doesn't bounce around too much. It takes a little bit more deliberate of a tug to get it out (because there's no belt loops to hold it down), but it's not bad.

    When I ride, I do the same thing if I'm wearing loose clothing (and it seems like most mountain cylists do, these days).

    I've ate chit pretty hard while cycling off road, including falling ON my holstered pistol, and it's never come out on it's own.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by RIS
    I don't normally wear it like that- I chose that pic because it shows how it hugs the body. When I'm off-duty and wearing street clothes, I normally don't tuck the T-shirt in. But if I showed you a picture of that, you wouldn't be seeing anything.

    There are times when I will wear it like you see it above- when I'm out in the woods camping, when I'm inside my own house, when I'm walking the dog (I live on a private road).

    If I'm not on duty, but something happens right in front of me, and I either need to do something, or there is a good chance that I may have to, I'llpull the T-shirt up and tuck it between the pistol and my body (just the part on the right side- I leave the front/back/left hanging out, and it almost looks normal). This is not unique to cops. Lets say you're out on the interstate late at night, and your wife and/or kids have to pee really bad. There's only one rest stop for miles, but when you pull off, you find it completely vacant, except for a couple of goblins hanging out there for no apparent reason. Heck, depending on the circumstances, I might already have it in my hand, holding it behind my right leg (you can't out-draw a pistol that's already out).

    When I run, I just wear a belt over my shorts and under my T-shirt to support the holster. There are no belt loops on my shorts, but it doesn't bounce around too much. It takes a little bit more deliberate of a tug to get it out (because there's no belt loops to hold it down), but it's not bad.

    When I ride, I do the same thing if I'm wearing loose clothing (and it seems like most mountain cylists do, these days).

    I've ate chit pretty hard while cycling off road, including falling ON my holstered pistol, and it's never come out on it's own.

    So I assume it's a leather belt you wear when riding, running? Chaffing?

  19. #19
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    Just a plain leather belt, with no stitching, and it gives me no trouble at all. Wearing the pistol right up against your body stabilizes it much more- it makes it feel lighter and it asks less of the belt that it supporting it. It almost feels like part of your body. The contour of the backstrap and the rear of the slide nest perfectly under my bottom rib on the right side, and I suspect that it fits like this for most medium-sized normal-shaped males (women's hips are wider, so their mileage may vary). It works well enough that it allows me to carry a larger pistol than I would probably be willing to carry otherwise.

  20. #20
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    This guy is apparently a south-paw, but this picture shows how close to the body it fits:



    You can kind of tell how it would be easy to miss if his arm was at his side, and if it were under the T-shirt, it would pretty much be invisible.

    Note: The fiber obtic sights shown are aftermarket, not Glock.

  21. #21
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    I've used a bunch of holsters to carry a bunch of hand guns over the years.

    The $10 Glock Sport / Combat is my favorite holster.

    FWIW, my second-favorite is the Galco Miami Classic (a $180 holster), worn between a tucked-in T-shirt and an open button-up shirt. It was an extremely comfortable way to carry a full-sized duty pistol and two spare mags (58 rounds total) in street clothes.

    And the holster that I hated the most was the Galco S.O.B. The first time I sat down while wearing it (in my car outside the gun store where I bought it), it went right back into the gun store and got returned.

  22. #22
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    I never really considered carrying while I'm riding. But my absolute favorite holster is the Crossbreed Supertuck for my Glock 27. No matter what I wear, nobody can ever tell that I'm carrying by looking at me.

    Never tried the $10 Glock Sport holster. I may have to check it out.

    Thanks guys!

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    when i ride i just keep my kel-tec in my front pocket with just a cheapy pocket holster. but for a hip holster i have a crossbread supertuck for my taurus 24/7 and i can not stop saying how good it is. i work nights driving a truck and wear it everyday, its still comfortable while sitting in the truck. but because i do wear it so much, i do have some wear marks on the slide, but its just a couple of spots on the finish.
    Jamis parker 1
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by boostedpgt
    when i ride i just keep my kel-tec in my front pocket with just a cheapy pocket holster. but for a hip holster i have a crossbread supertuck for my taurus 24/7 and i can not stop saying how good it is. i work nights driving a truck and wear it everyday, its still comfortable while sitting in the truck. but because i do wear it so much, i do have some wear marks on the slide, but its just a couple of spots on the finish.
    You will probably not be able to reliably/quickly get the get the Kel Tec out of your front trouser pocket when seated.

    I am intrigued by the CrossBreed Supertuck. I wouldn't buy the Supertuck over the internet to try it out, but if I knew someone who had one, I'd sure want to borrow it to try it.

    In more than a quarter-century of daily concealed carry, I've never found an IWB holster that I would be willing to live with for even a short period of time. An IWB holster changes the way that your trousers or shorts fit, so you end up having to buy them based upon your holster. An extra 1.5" (thickness) of a holstered weapon is going to add a couple of inches to your circumference (waist size).

    Get used to the finish wear from daily carry. I've worn a number of pistols (including Glocks) shiny, and I've never had any complaints about the condition of the finish of my pistol from anyone that I've pointed it at.

    I don't know what kind of truck driving you do, but if it's long haul, I'd just keep it in a paddle holster next to me on the seat, and stuff it into my pants when I got out. For local delivery work (in and out of the truck all day), whatever's comfortable would work. Anything in between, I'd be tempted to try a shoulder rig, because you can draw whille seated, and they're really comfy.

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