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  1. #1
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    Maverick Speedball Remote Pro Review

    [SIZE=3]Maverick Speedball Remote – Pro Review[/SIZE]
    Author: Francis Cebedo
    Date: March 20, 2007

    Introduction:
    Do you lower your seat when you descend? Would you lower your seat on technical descents if lowering was a quick and easy task? If you do, read on about this exciting product from Maverick.

    A long time ago, there was a product called the Hite Rite. It was a simple $15 dollar device that allowed you to lower and raise your saddle without dismounting... maybe. As it required the dexterity of an acrobat, the product died after a few years and no new products took over the category. In recent years however, an upstart company called Gravity Dropper has introduced an adjustable seatpost and many riders have been converted into believers of adjustable seatposts.

    The Speedball Remote is Maverick's entry into this category. It offers quality and durability and a few innovative features in this arena where durabilty has been suspect.



    Specs and Features:
    The SpeedBall R is available in 30.9 mm and 31.6 mm diameters.
    Length: 382 mm / Weight: 494 grams

    Review:
    The Speedball has been around for a year or so but now it has been updated with a remote lever. The remote allows you to lower the seat without taking your hands off your handlebar. It uses a normal cable that is easily cut and ajdusted to length. The lever is a simple multidirection stick that can be mounted anywhere on either side of the handlebars. I can pulled, pushed, up, down as any tension in the cable will release the lock on the seatpost.

    Releasing the lock on the post allows it go down to any position within the three inches of travel. The weight of the rider counters the air pressure of the post to allow it lower. To raise the saddle, simply unweight from the seat and the air pressure in the post raises the saddle.

    When the seatpost is not on the highest position, nothing is locking it from going up. Thus, if you pull up on the saddle, or it gets caught in your shorts, etc. The saddle can go up. Pushing it back down will return it to its set position. This is a bit unusual at first but not really a big issue during normal use.

    The remote is a very simple cable attachment that can purchased as an upgrade to existing Maverick Speedballs. It is available for $40 and essentially pulls the manual lever of the Speedball with the cable. The cable goes behind the seatpost and just free flows to the handlebar. Neat freaks might balk but folks who like simplicity and flexibility will appreciate it. It's fairly easy to install and secure alongside the other cables. Once it's on, it doesn't really get in the way even as the seatpost is moved up and down. With fancier frame setups, more zip ties will do the trick in securing the cable better.

    Does it work? Heck ya! Adjustable seatposts are here to stay and this is one darn good product in the category. Folks who lower their seat all the time need this product. Folks who don't lower their seat all the time ought to try this product. See, lowering your seat usually involves stopping, dismounting, finding the right height, ensuring the saddle is straight, and getting back on the bike. This not only causes you to lose rhythm and flow, but it also interrupts the group... and you lose your spot in the queue! Not to mention, you have to put your seat back up on the next uphill. As a result, folks often don't lower their seat, or they save that only for the roughest, extended sections.

    If you have an adjustable seatpost, you can lower your seat in many more opportunities. You are safer, faster and have more fun. We won't go over the benefits of lowering your seat but it basically lowers your center of gravity and gets your weight off the front wheel. This leads to safer, better cornering and descending.

    The biggest question/request is for the Speedball to be available in 27.2 size. Maverick is planning to release this at the end of 2007. To make the post strong enough for Maverick's standards, the wall thicknesses have to be increased. This leaves less room for the internals and complicates matters. However, Maverick has enough interest to make this happen.




    (click on image to enlarge)



    Strengths:
    - this single upgrade improves safety and confidence by leaps and bounds
    - the cable and remote mounting is very simple and flexible. The remote lever can be mounted in many positions
    - the saddle can be lowered anywhere in the travel. There are no preset positions
    - construction, durability are exceptional

    Weaknesses:
    - not available in 27.2
    - on the down position, the seat can rise when pulled up
    - cable routing is not the neatest
    - a little bit of play is present on the seat

    Conclusion:
    This is a great product. It allows riders to descend swiftly and safely by lowering their center of gravity. It gives riders more confidence to do technical sections since it gets the high seatpost out of the way.

    The task at hand is addressed by a post that looks good, is durable and easy to operate

    Many have mentioned that an adjustable height post is the best upgrade they've ever put on their bike and that they'll never ride without one. One of the issues however is the durability of some products in the market. Many feel burned by bad experiences with a broken post in the worst situations. Maverick's entry in this category has been a solid performer. With the new remote lever, it's now a player in the the remotely adjustable seatpost arena.

    Overall Rating:
    I give the Maverick Speedball Remote 4.75 chilis out of 5. It's almost perfect with just a couple weaknesses mentioned. On the trail though, this post just elevates your enjoyment, speed and safety into new heights.


    Retail Price:
    Maverick Speedball Remote: $250
    Maverick Speedball: $220
    Remote kit: $40

    Website
    http://www.maverickbike.com/main/do/home
    User Reviews
    http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Seatpost...t_129473.shtml
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by francois; 04-01-2007 at 07:43 AM.
    IPA will save America

  2. #2
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    Nice review, but I'm a little confused. Does the post always extend back to full height even without the lever actuated, or does it only do this if you accidentally pull up on it? For example, if you stand up while decending, it will raise back up even without touching the lever.

  3. #3
    Knomer
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    Wake me when it drops 4 inches or more.

  4. #4
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    Good Review, Francis

    My only issue are the comments about it being durable. It's too soon and too few have been sold to determine if it's durable.

    Time will tell.

  5. #5
    DenverDH'er
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    Sounds pretty sweet to me.

    DAMN that is a nice ride!

  6. #6
    swag ho Administrator
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdiddy
    Nice review, but I'm a little confused. Does the post always extend back to full height even without the lever actuated, or does it only do this if you accidentally pull up on it? For example, if you stand up while decending, it will raise back up even without touching the lever.
    No. It will only raise up if you pull up on it. If your behind or shorts get caught in the saddle for example and you pull up, it can inch up a bit.

    It's more an issue at the garage when lifting your bike by the saddle for example.

    fc
    IPA will save America

  7. #7
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    Oh YES!!!!! I've had a Speedball for about 8 months and I couldn't imagine riding without now - its that good. I knew when I bought my Speedball, that the remote was in the pipeline - and now its here. I shall be buying straight away. Its made a great product even better. I am excited!!!!

    P

  8. #8
    Binge Rider
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    Good job! SpeedBall Pro is worth it!!!

    I just upgraded to the remote and love it. I've had the Speed Ball for about a year and have been impressed with it since day one. For those who ride a bike with an interrupted seat tube (Specialized Enduro) it is a must. I rode a lot of dirt singletrack and found the manual lever plenty good enough for those types of trails. Taking a hand off the bars was no problem. But I moved to southern AZ where the trails are rocky and technical and shoot up as much as bomb down. Taking a hand off the bars required a little more thought and timing. If anything, the flow was interrupted. Sometimes because of the difficulty of the trail, I would just have to leave it down until I got through a tough section and found a spot to lift it back up. We all know pedaling with the seat lower while going up is less than optimal. The remote was a must for me around here.

    Cable Routing
    It can be difficult for cable routing and it will add some clutter to the bars. Get creative with the routing. It is a basic shifter cable that operates the remote so I ran it along my other cables. The cable that came with the upgrade was too small to do this as it is intended to take a more direct route. I used a new cable and housing to do this and a very clean look was the result.

    Durability
    As far as durability, I have crashed a couple times - once hard enough to bend my saddle rails. The SpeedBall had no damage. Unknown users grab it by the saddle all the time and I watch it pull up... no problem. Yes, there is a little lateral movement in the block but I have not noticed it while riding - only when I am off the bike and holding it by the saddle.

    Support
    I have had some of the best support from Maverick. I ran into their team up in Tucson and they were super friendly. The Tech Support guys are top notch and the warranty is great.

    I had no idea how much I used a descending seat post until I got one. Now that I have it, I use it all the time. It was a tough choice between the GD and the SpeedBall. Both had their advantages and disadvantages. The biggest disadvantage the SpeedBall had was no remote lever. Now there rally nothing left to compare. Infinite travel, air sprung - not coil thus, a little lighter (but not much), reliable. What is not to like? Ok- it's rather pricey but what isn't in this sport?

    Spine Shank
    "Courage is fear holding on a minute longer" General Patton


    [SIZE="1"]CAUTION: ADJUSTABLE SUSPENSION CONFUSES ME[/SIZE]

  9. #9
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    I've also had one for many months. Mine is the non-remote one and I really would not want the remote one and I hate ugly cable routing. I can see the reason folks would want a remote but I never miss it with the lever under the seat setup. It is very easy to lower or raise the seat while riding. You need to pick your spots obviously to take a hand off the bars but I do not fine that much of a compromise and the more sano setup makes up for it IMO.

  10. #10
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    I've had mine on my nomad for over a year.It works very well. Once you get one you will be surpized how often you use it. I did have a problem with mine once and Maverick repaired it and had it back to me in a week.

  11. #11
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    So Gravity Dropper or Maverick Speedball?

    Any opinons out there?

  12. #12
    TranceX Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois
    No. It will only raise up if you pull up on it. If your behind or shorts get caught in the saddle for example and you pull up, it can inch up a bit.

    It's more an issue at the garage when lifting your bike by the saddle for example.

    fc
    Props for clearing that one out!

    Now, which is better Dropper or Mavs?

    TIA!
    Quote Originally Posted by jcatienza
    There was no need to scare potential buyers and burn bridges "buddy"
    Tell me now, what's Product testing all bout then?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by macdaddyg2006
    Any opinons out there?
    I have a buddy that has the GD. He has snapped the post three different times. I'm mean the seat was off the bike. He had no problem having replaced everytime it broke though. My Speedball failed once but, all it did was lose air and would not stay in the up position. It was repaired and back to me in a week.

  14. #14
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    I borrowed a friend's GD for a few rides. Didn't like the way the drop was actuated. You needed to click the lever with weight on the seat, got off the seat, and then reweight it. Not a big deal but I just thought it should be simplier. Sounds like the mav is easier to use.
    Just my $.02 worth.

  15. #15
    Is Muddy
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    The seatpost looks great and all, but the only thing that's biting me is the clamp mechanism. It looks earily similar to the Bontrager Race - xXx Lite carbon seatpost that has (fact.) one of the WORST systems ever. Working at a bike store that deals with Trek, Gary Fisher, Lemond, and Klein, I've seen a lot of damaged/defective Bonty parts come through. The Race xXx Lite's clamp system (or whatever its called) seems to have the highest failure rate out of all the seatpost clamp designs. I had one myself for about 2 weeks, and the little corners on the clamp arms simply tore back, and released me and my seat right onto my back tire during a high speed decent. I'm interested in hearing how this clamp mechanism is different, and if it is stronger or not. I would get one, but I still doubt it's durability until I'm proven otherwise.
    2007 Waltworks 29er,
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    2002 Giant DH Comp,
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  16. #16
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    hi
    could you please tell me
    the length 382mm is this the total from the bottom to the top of the post when fully extented?

    i have herd you can cut about 50 mm of to make it shorter???any ideas
    i am worried i wont get my seat real low as my frame limits me

    realy like the idea of this post just want to find out if it will realy suit me befor i buy one

    thanks for your time



    Quote Originally Posted by francois
    [SIZE=3]Maverick Speedball Remote Pro Review[/SIZE]
    Author: Francis Cebedo
    Date: March 20, 2007

    Introduction:
    Do you lower your seat when you descend? Would you lower your seat on technical descents if lowering was a quick and easy task? If you do, read on about this exciting product from Maverick.

    A long time ago, there was a product called the Hite Rite. It was a simple $15 dollar device that allowed you to lower and raise your saddle without dismounting... maybe. As it required the dexterity of an acrobat, the product died after a few years and no new products took over the category. In recent years however, an upstart company called Gravity Dropper has introduced an adjustable seatpost and many riders have been converted into believers of adjustable seatposts.

    The Speedball Remote is Maverick's entry into this category. It offers quality and durability and a few innovative features in this arena where durabilty has been suspect.



    Specs and Features:
    The SpeedBall R is available in 30.9 mm and 31.6 mm diameters.
    Length: 382 mm / Weight: 494 grams

    Review:
    The Speedball has been around for a year or so but now it has been updated with a remote lever. The remote allows you to lower the seat without taking your hands off your handlebar. It uses a normal cable that is easily cut and ajdusted to length. The lever is a simple multidirection stick that can be mounted anywhere on either side of the handlebars. I can pulled, pushed, up, down as any tension in the cable will release the lock on the seatpost.

    Releasing the lock on the post allows it go down to any position within the three inches of travel. The weight of the rider counters the air pressure of the post to allow it lower. To raise the saddle, simply unweight from the seat and the air pressure in the post raises the saddle.

    When the seatpost is not on the highest position, nothing is locking it from going up. Thus, if you pull up on the saddle, or it gets caught in your shorts, etc. The saddle can go up. Pushing it back down will return it to its set position. This is a bit unusual at first but not really a big issue during normal use.

    The remote is a very simple cable attachment that can purchased as an upgrade to existing Maverick Speedballs. It is available for $40 and essentially pulls the manual lever of the Speedball with the cable. The cable goes behind the seatpost and just free flows to the handlebar. Neat freaks might balk but folks who like simplicity and flexibility will appreciate it. It's fairly easy to install and secure alongside the other cables. Once it's on, it doesn't really get in the way even as the seatpost is moved up and down. With fancier frame setups, more zip ties will do the trick in securing the cable better.

    Does it work? Heck ya! Adjustable seatposts are here to stay and this is one darn good product in the category. Folks who lower their seat all the time need this product. Folks who don't lower their seat all the time ought to try this product. See, lowering your seat usually involves stopping, dismounting, finding the right height, ensuring the saddle is straight, and getting back on the bike. This not only causes you to lose rhythm and flow, but it also interrupts the group... and you lose your spot in the queue! Not to mention, you have to put your seat back up on the next uphill. As a result, folks often don't lower their seat, or they save that only for the roughest, extended sections.

    If you have an adjustable seatpost, you can lower your seat in many more opportunities. You are safer, faster and have more fun. We won't go over the benefits of lowering your seat but it basically lowers your center of gravity and gets your weight off the front wheel. This leads to safer, better cornering and descending.

    The biggest question/request is for the Speedball to be available in 27.2 size. Maverick is planning to release this at the end of 2007. To make the post strong enough for Maverick's standards, the wall thicknesses have to be increased. This leaves less room for the internals and complicates matters. However, Maverick has enough interest to make this happen.




    (click on image to enlarge)



    Strengths:
    - this single upgrade improves safety and confidence by leaps and bounds
    - the cable and remote mounting is very simple and flexible. The remote lever can be mounted in many positions
    - the saddle can be lowered anywhere in the travel. There are no preset positions
    - construction, durability are exceptional

    Weaknesses:
    - not available in 27.2
    - on the down position, the seat can rise when pulled up
    - cable routing is not the neatest
    - a little bit of play is present on the seat

    Conclusion:
    This is a great product. It allows riders to descend swiftly and safely by lowering their center of gravity. It gives riders more confidence to do technical sections since it gets the high seatpost out of the way.

    The task at hand is addressed by a post that looks good, is durable and easy to operate

    Many have mentioned that an adjustable height post is the best upgrade they've ever put on their bike and that they'll never ride without one. One of the issues however is the durability of some products in the market. Many feel burned by bad experiences with a broken post in the worst situations. Maverick's entry in this category has been a solid performer. With the new remote lever, it's now a player in the the remotely adjustable seatpost arena.

    Overall Rating:
    I give the Maverick Speedball Remote 4.75 chilis out of 5. It's almost perfect with just a couple weaknesses mentioned. On the trail though, this post just elevates your enjoyment, speed and safety into new heights.


    Retail Price:
    Maverick Speedball Remote: $250
    Maverick Speedball: $220
    Remote kit: $40

    Website
    http://www.maverickbike.com/main/do/home
    User Reviews
    http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Seatpost...t_129473.shtml

  17. #17
    mtbr member
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    You might shoot off an email over to Al over at Maverick...

    He should be able to answer your question regarding the post specifications and also, cutting the post. Here's his email address... al@maverickbike.com

  18. #18
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    The Office Chair ghost is still haunting me to this day.

    27.2? My first prototype was a 27.2.

    This is hilarious. The first time I posted about this on these forums back in 2002, people poo-pooed the idea. Now, I see comments like "I couldn't imagine riding without [one] now". Hilarious. Oh well, at least I didn't have to be the one to invest in developing it. Way to go Maverick.

    Once they come out with a 27.2 version, my tune will probably be "If you can't beat 'em, join 'em" Nice design Maverick. What I had envisioned.






  19. #19
    EastBaySteez
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    Speedball

    I have a buddie that rides a speed ball. He likes it but hates it. Hes had so many problems with it hes going back to a regular post. It is on his Nomad and he rides that bike like its a FR hucking machine. 1st off the post is sick in idea. When it works well is awsome.

    In 2 months these are the problems he has had. He bent the rails on the seat post. Not the rails on the seat itself. He jumped off a table and landed on the seat alittle to hard and the post rails bent totaaly flat. He got it warrentied no problem. Now the post isnt holding its position. Even though there is the required ammout of air in the post itself.

    When the post is working it is awsome. I would buy it if I had a AM bike or a XC HT rig. Otherwise I dont think it is sturdy enough to take the beatings of a full on FR or DH rig, IMO that is what it is aimed at. People who need to lower and raise their seats more than say a XC rider.
    Gamut
    Team Evil
    Formerly: motormonkeyr6

  20. #20
    Rock Star!!!
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    No good

    maybe down the road they'll get it right

  21. #21
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    yea what the other guy wrote. 3' drop is not enough. my GD's 4" is not enough. high speed downhilling and downhill technical requires even more. GD said they are working on a 5' model (as I wrote in other threads, I broke my GD after only 4 months... . they replaced it quick- let's see how long THIS one lasts...

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by RockitJeff
    yea what the other guy wrote. 3' drop is not enough. my GD's 4" is not enough. high speed downhilling and downhill technical requires even more. GD said they are working on a 5' model (as I wrote in other threads, I broke my GD after only 4 months... . they replaced it quick- let's see how long THIS one lasts...
    Was the GD that you broke a front or rear facing model..and was it the newer (supposedly strengthened) models?

    I'm curious. I own 2 GDs (a 3/1 and a 4/1). My original 3/1 front facing model broke. I haven't had any issues with any of the newer ones.

  23. #23
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    I have been riding both the GD and SB and the only problem with the GD is they do not mak e it in a 31.6 for a Chumba . The 2 problems I have the SB. Problem # 1 it comes up when I jump and squeeze with my legs. I also do Moto X and I control the bike with my legs . When the seat has no locking position it can move all over the place This sucks for me . If i was riding along the beach or on the bike trail with no jumps I would love it.
    Problem # 2 It has more twist in it than the GD. I will rid this post when it has a solid lock and holds its position when you let of the lever, I would also like it if you could have a 5 inch drop model . I have both seat posts and I am back to riding a Thompson .
    I don't like the idea of shimming the GD up to 31.6 and I dont like the pop up on the SB.
    I do love the GD that is on my Yeti ASX . Works perfect.

    Come on GD make a 31.6 I will put in my order right now.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChumbaJason
    I don't like the idea of shimming the GD up to 31.6 and I dont like the pop up on the SB.
    I do love the GD that is on my Yeti ASX . Works perfect.

    Come on GD make a 31.6 I will put in my order right now.
    What's the problem with using a shim? I use a 31.6 (4") on my Top Fuel and it works great.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Shorts
    Was the GD that you broke a front or rear facing model..and was it the newer (supposedly strengthened) models?

    I'm curious. I own 2 GDs (a 3/1 and a 4/1). My original 3/1 front facing model broke. I haven't had any issues with any of the newer ones.
    I think it was the newer inner post (I ordered it from them around March); it's a 4/1....They said there was a crack in the outer post that caused the inner post to break...

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