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  1. #1
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    100% Proof Republicans are Unfit to Lead

    Republicans: They were for posting the recipe for nuclear weapons on the web for the convenience of terrorists before they were against it.




    November 3, 2006
    NY Times
    [SIZE="5"]U.S. Web Archive Is Said to Reveal a Nuclear Guide[/SIZE]
    By WILLIAM J. BROAD


    Last March, the federal government set up a Web site to make public a vast archive of Iraqi documents captured during the war. The Bush administration did so under pressure from Congressional Republicans who said they hoped to “leverage the Internet” to find new evidence of the prewar dangers posed by Saddam Hussein.

    But in recent weeks, the site has posted some documents that weapons experts say are a danger themselves: detailed accounts of Iraq’s secret nuclear research before the 1991 Persian Gulf war. The documents, the experts say, constitute a basic guide to building an atom bomb.

    Last night, the government shut down the Web site after The New York Times asked about complaints from weapons experts and arms-control officials. A spokesman for the director of national intelligence said access to the site had been suspended “pending a review to ensure its content is appropriate for public viewing.”

    Officials of the International Atomic Energy Agency, fearing that the information could help states like Iran develop nuclear arms, had privately protested last week to the American ambassador to the agency, according to European diplomats who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the issue’s sensitivity. One diplomat said the agency’s technical experts “were shocked” at the public disclosures.

    The documents, roughly a dozen in number, contain charts, diagrams, equations and lengthy narratives about bomb building that nuclear experts who have viewed them say go beyond what is available elsewhere on the Internet and in other public forums. For instance, the papers give detailed information on how to build nuclear firing circuits and triggering explosives, as well as the radioactive cores of atom bombs.

    “For the U.S. to toss a match into this flammable area is very irresponsible,” said A. Bryan Siebert, a former director of classification at the federal Department of Energy, which runs the nation’s nuclear arms program. “There’s a lot of things about nuclear weapons that are secret and should remain so.”

    The government had received earlier warnings about the contents of the Web site. Last spring, after the site began posting old Iraqi documents about chemical weapons, United Nations arms-control officials in New York won the withdrawal of a report that gave information on how to make tabun and sarin, nerve agents that kill by causing respiratory failure.

    The campaign for the online archive was mounted by conservative publications and politicians, who said that the nation’s spy agencies had failed adequately to analyze the 48,000 boxes of documents seized since the March 2003 invasion. With the public increasingly skeptical about the rationale and conduct of the war, the chairmen of the House and Senate intelligence committees argued that wide analysis and translation of the documents — most of them in Arabic — would reinvigorate the search for clues that Mr. Hussein had resumed his unconventional arms programs in the years before the invasion. American search teams never found such evidence.

    The director of national intelligence, John D. Negroponte, had resisted setting up the Web site, which some intelligence officials felt implicitly raised questions about the competence and judgment of government analysts. But President Bush approved the site’s creation after Congressional Republicans proposed legislation to force the documents’ release.

    In his statement last night, Mr. Negroponte’s spokesman, Chad Kolton, said, “While strict criteria had already been established to govern posted documents, the material currently on the Web site, as well as the procedures used to post new documents, will be carefully reviewed before the site becomes available again.”

    A spokesman for the National Security Council, Gordon D. Johndroe, said, “We’re confident the D.N.I. is taking the appropriate steps to maintain the balance between public information and national security.”

    The Web site, “Operation Iraqi Freedom Document Portal,” was a constantly expanding portrait of prewar Iraq. Its many thousands of documents included everything from a collection of religious and nationalistic poetry to instructions for the repair of parachutes to handwritten notes from Mr. Hussein’s intelligence service. It became a popular quarry for a legion of bloggers, translators and amateur historians.

    Among the dozens of documents in English were Iraqi reports written in the 1990s and in 2002 for United Nations inspectors in charge of making sure Iraq had abandoned its unconventional arms programs after the Persian Gulf war. Experts say that at the time, Mr. Hussein’s scientists were on the verge of building an atom bomb, as little as a year away.

    European diplomats said this week that some of those nuclear documents on the Web site were identical to the ones presented to the United Nations Security Council in late 2002, as America got ready to invade Iraq. But unlike those on the Web site, the papers given to the Security Council had been extensively edited, to remove sensitive information on unconventional arms.

    The deletions, the diplomats said, had been done in consultation with the United States and other nuclear-weapons nations. Mohamed ElBaradei, the director of the International Atomic Energy Agency, which ran the nuclear part of the inspections, told the Security Council in late 2002 that the deletions were “consistent with the principle that proliferation-sensitive information should not be released.”

    In Europe, a senior diplomat said atomic experts there had studied the nuclear documents on the Web site and judged their public release as potentially dangerous. “It’s a cookbook,” said the diplomat, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of his agency’s rules. “If you had this, it would short-circuit a lot of things.”

    The New York Times had examined dozens of the documents and asked a half dozen nuclear experts to evaluate some of them.

    Peter D. Zimmerman, a physicist and former United States government arms scientist now at the war studies department of King’s College, London, called the posted material “very sensitive, much of it undoubtedly secret restricted data.”

    Ray E. Kidder, a senior nuclear physicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, an arms design center, said “some things in these documents would be helpful” to nations aspiring to develop nuclear weapons and should have remained secret.

    A senior American intelligence official who deals routinely with atomic issues said the documents showed “where the Iraqis failed and how to get around the failures.” The documents, he added, could perhaps help Iran or other nations making a serious effort to develop nuclear arms, but probably not terrorists or poorly equipped states. The official, who requested anonymity because of his agency’s rules against public comment, called the papers “a road map that helps you get from point A to point B, but only if you already have a car.”

    Thomas S. Blanton, director of the National Security Archive, a private group at George Washington University that tracks federal secrecy decisions, said the impetus for the Web site’s creation came from an array of sources — private conservative groups, Congressional Republicans and some figures in the Bush administration — who clung to the belief that close examination of the captured documents would show that Mr. Hussein’s government had clandestinely reconstituted an unconventional arms programs.

    “There were hundreds of people who said, ‘There’s got to be gold in them thar hills,’ ” Mr. Blanton said.

    The campaign for the Web site was led by the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Representative Peter Hoekstra of Michigan. Last November, he and his Senate counterpart, Pat Roberts of Kansas, wrote to Mr. Negroponte, asking him to post the Iraqi material. The sheer volume of the documents, they argued, had overwhelmed the intelligence community.

    Some intelligence officials feared that individual documents, translated and interpreted by amateurs, would be used out of context to second-guess the intelligence agencies’ view that Mr. Hussein did not have unconventional weapons or substantive ties to Al Qaeda. Reviewing the documents for release would add an unnecessary burden on busy intelligence analysts, they argued.

    On March 16, after the documents’ release was approved, Mr. Negroponte’s office issued a terse public announcement including a disclaimer that remained on the Web site: “The U.S. government has made no determination regarding the authenticity of the documents, validity or factual accuracy of the information contained therein, or the quality of any translations, when available.”

    On April 18, about a month after the first documents were made public, Mr. Hoekstra issued a news release acknowledging “minimal risks,” but saying the site “will enable us to better understand information such as Saddam’s links to terrorism, weapons of mass destruction and violence against the Iraqi people.” He added: “It will allow us to leverage the Internet to enable a mass examination as opposed to limiting it to a few exclusive elites.”

    Yesterday, before the site was shut down, Jamal Ware, a spokesman for Mr. Hoekstra, said the government had “developed a sound process to review the documents to ensure sensitive or dangerous information is not posted.” Later, he said the complaints about the site “didn’t sound like a big deal,” adding, “We were a little surprised when they pulled the plug.”

    The precise review process that led to the posting of the nuclear and chemical-weapons documents is unclear. But in testimony before Congress last spring, a senior official from Mr. Negroponte’s office, Daniel Butler, described a “triage” system used to sort out material that should remain classified. Even so, he said, the policy was to “be biased towards release if at all possible.“ Government officials say all the documents in Arabic have received at least a quick review by Arabic linguists.

    Some of the first posted documents dealt with Iraq’s program to make germ weapons, followed by a wave of papers on chemical arms.

    At the United Nations in New York, the chemical papers raised alarms at the Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission, which had been in charge of searching Iraq for all unconventional arms, save the nuclear ones.

    In April, diplomats said, the commission’s acting chief weapons inspector, Demetrius Perricos, lodged an objection with the United States mission to the United Nations over the document that dealt with the nerve agents tabun and sarin.

    Soon, the document vanished from the Web site. On June 8, diplomats said, Mr. Perricos told the Security Council of how risky arms information had shown up on a public Web site and how his agency appreciated the American cooperation in resolving the matter.

    In September, the Web site began posting the nuclear documents, and some soon raised concerns. On Sept. 12, it posted a document it called “Progress of Iraqi nuclear program circa 1995.” That description is potentially misleading since the research occurred years earlier.

    The Iraqi document is marked “Draft FFCD Version 3 (20.12.95),” meaning it was preparatory for the “Full, Final, Complete Disclosure” that Iraq made to United Nations inspectors in March 1996. The document carries three diagrams showing cross sections of bomb cores, and their diameters.

    On Sept. 20, the site posted a much larger document, “Summary of technical achievements of Iraq’s former nuclear program.” It runs to 51 pages, 18 focusing on the development of Iraq’s bomb design. Topics included physical theory, the atomic core and high-explosive experiments. By early October, diplomats and officials said, United Nations arms inspectors in New York and their counterparts in Vienna were alarmed and discussing what to do.

    Last week in Vienna, Olli J. Heinonen, head of safeguards at the international atomic agency, expressed concern about the documents to the American ambassador, Gregory L. Schulte, diplomats said.

    Calls to Mr. Schulte’s spokesman yesterday were not returned.
    Last edited by Wasatch Walt; 11-02-2006 at 08:56 PM.

  2. #2
    There is NO Punk Bible!
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    ... and if we just ... sound of crickets chirping....

    Quote Originally Posted by Wasatch Walt
    Republicans: They were for posting the recipe for nuclear weapons on the web for the convenience of terrorists before they were against it.




    November 3, 2006
    NY Times
    [SIZE="5"]U.S. Web Archive Is Said to Reveal a Nuclear Guide[/SIZE]
    By WILLIAM J. BROAD


    Last March, the federal government set up a Web site to make public a vast archive of Iraqi documents captured during the war. The Bush administration did so under pressure from Congressional Republicans who said they hoped to “leverage the Internet” to find new evidence of the prewar dangers posed by Saddam Hussein.

    But in recent weeks, the site has posted some documents that weapons experts say are a danger themselves: detailed accounts of Iraq’s secret nuclear research before the 1991 Persian Gulf war. The documents, the experts say, constitute a basic guide to building an atom bomb.

    Last night, the government shut down the Web site after The New York Times asked about complaints from weapons experts and arms-control officials. A spokesman for the director of national intelligence said access to the site had been suspended “pending a review to ensure its content is appropriate for public viewing.”

    Officials of the International Atomic Energy Agency, fearing that the information could help states like Iran develop nuclear arms, had privately protested last week to the American ambassador to the agency, according to European diplomats who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the issue’s sensitivity. One diplomat said the agency’s technical experts “were shocked” at the public disclosures.

    The documents, roughly a dozen in number, contain charts, diagrams, equations and lengthy narratives about bomb building that nuclear experts who have viewed them say go beyond what is available elsewhere on the Internet and in other public forums. For instance, the papers give detailed information on how to build nuclear firing circuits and triggering explosives, as well as the radioactive cores of atom bombs.

    “For the U.S. to toss a match into this flammable area is very irresponsible,” said A. Bryan Siebert, a former director of classification at the federal Department of Energy, which runs the nation’s nuclear arms program. “There’s a lot of things about nuclear weapons that are secret and should remain so.”

    The government had received earlier warnings about the contents of the Web site. Last spring, after the site began posting old Iraqi documents about chemical weapons, United Nations arms-control officials in New York won the withdrawal of a report that gave information on how to make tabun and sarin, nerve agents that kill by causing respiratory failure.

    The campaign for the online archive was mounted by conservative publications and politicians, who said that the nation’s spy agencies had failed adequately to analyze the 48,000 boxes of documents seized since the March 2003 invasion. With the public increasingly skeptical about the rationale and conduct of the war, the chairmen of the House and Senate intelligence committees argued that wide analysis and translation of the documents — most of them in Arabic — would reinvigorate the search for clues that Mr. Hussein had resumed his unconventional arms programs in the years before the invasion. American search teams never found such evidence.

    The director of national intelligence, John D. Negroponte, had resisted setting up the Web site, which some intelligence officials felt implicitly raised questions about the competence and judgment of government analysts. But President Bush approved the site’s creation after Congressional Republicans proposed legislation to force the documents’ release.

    In his statement last night, Mr. Negroponte’s spokesman, Chad Kolton, said, “While strict criteria had already been established to govern posted documents, the material currently on the Web site, as well as the procedures used to post new documents, will be carefully reviewed before the site becomes available again.”

    A spokesman for the National Security Council, Gordon D. Johndroe, said, “We’re confident the D.N.I. is taking the appropriate steps to maintain the balance between public information and national security.”

    The Web site, “Operation Iraqi Freedom Document Portal,” was a constantly expanding portrait of prewar Iraq. Its many thousands of documents included everything from a collection of religious and nationalistic poetry to instructions for the repair of parachutes to handwritten notes from Mr. Hussein’s intelligence service. It became a popular quarry for a legion of bloggers, translators and amateur historians.

    Among the dozens of documents in English were Iraqi reports written in the 1990s and in 2002 for United Nations inspectors in charge of making sure Iraq had abandoned its unconventional arms programs after the Persian Gulf war. Experts say that at the time, Mr. Hussein’s scientists were on the verge of building an atom bomb, as little as a year away.

    European diplomats said this week that some of those nuclear documents on the Web site were identical to the ones presented to the United Nations Security Council in late 2002, as America got ready to invade Iraq. But unlike those on the Web site, the papers given to the Security Council had been extensively edited, to remove sensitive information on unconventional arms.

    The deletions, the diplomats said, had been done in consultation with the United States and other nuclear-weapons nations. Mohamed ElBaradei, the director of the International Atomic Energy Agency, which ran the nuclear part of the inspections, told the Security Council in late 2002 that the deletions were “consistent with the principle that proliferation-sensitive information should not be released.”

    In Europe, a senior diplomat said atomic experts there had studied the nuclear documents on the Web site and judged their public release as potentially dangerous. “It’s a cookbook,” said the diplomat, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of his agency’s rules. “If you had this, it would short-circuit a lot of things.”

    The New York Times had examined dozens of the documents and asked a half dozen nuclear experts to evaluate some of them.

    Peter D. Zimmerman, a physicist and former United States government arms scientist now at the war studies department of King’s College, London, called the posted material “very sensitive, much of it undoubtedly secret restricted data.”

    Ray E. Kidder, a senior nuclear physicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, an arms design center, said “some things in these documents would be helpful” to nations aspiring to develop nuclear weapons and should have remained secret.

    A senior American intelligence official who deals routinely with atomic issues said the documents showed “where the Iraqis failed and how to get around the failures.” The documents, he added, could perhaps help Iran or other nations making a serious effort to develop nuclear arms, but probably not terrorists or poorly equipped states. The official, who requested anonymity because of his agency’s rules against public comment, called the papers “a road map that helps you get from point A to point B, but only if you already have a car.”

    Thomas S. Blanton, director of the National Security Archive, a private group at George Washington University that tracks federal secrecy decisions, said the impetus for the Web site’s creation came from an array of sources — private conservative groups, Congressional Republicans and some figures in the Bush administration — who clung to the belief that close examination of the captured documents would show that Mr. Hussein’s government had clandestinely reconstituted an unconventional arms programs.

    “There were hundreds of people who said, ‘There’s got to be gold in them thar hills,’ ” Mr. Blanton said.

    The campaign for the Web site was led by the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Representative Peter Hoekstra of Michigan. Last November, he and his Senate counterpart, Pat Roberts of Kansas, wrote to Mr. Negroponte, asking him to post the Iraqi material. The sheer volume of the documents, they argued, had overwhelmed the intelligence community.

    Some intelligence officials feared that individual documents, translated and interpreted by amateurs, would be used out of context to second-guess the intelligence agencies’ view that Mr. Hussein did not have unconventional weapons or substantive ties to Al Qaeda. Reviewing the documents for release would add an unnecessary burden on busy intelligence analysts, they argued.

    On March 16, after the documents’ release was approved, Mr. Negroponte’s office issued a terse public announcement including a disclaimer that remained on the Web site: “The U.S. government has made no determination regarding the authenticity of the documents, validity or factual accuracy of the information contained therein, or the quality of any translations, when available.”

    On April 18, about a month after the first documents were made public, Mr. Hoekstra issued a news release acknowledging “minimal risks,” but saying the site “will enable us to better understand information such as Saddam’s links to terrorism, weapons of mass destruction and violence against the Iraqi people.” He added: “It will allow us to leverage the Internet to enable a mass examination as opposed to limiting it to a few exclusive elites.”

    Yesterday, before the site was shut down, Jamal Ware, a spokesman for Mr. Hoekstra, said the government had “developed a sound process to review the documents to ensure sensitive or dangerous information is not posted.” Later, he said the complaints about the site “didn’t sound like a big deal,” adding, “We were a little surprised when they pulled the plug.”

    The precise review process that led to the posting of the nuclear and chemical-weapons documents is unclear. But in testimony before Congress last spring, a senior official from Mr. Negroponte’s office, Daniel Butler, described a “triage” system used to sort out material that should remain classified. Even so, he said, the policy was to “be biased towards release if at all possible.“ Government officials say all the documents in Arabic have received at least a quick review by Arabic linguists.

    Some of the first posted documents dealt with Iraq’s program to make germ weapons, followed by a wave of papers on chemical arms.

    At the United Nations in New York, the chemical papers raised alarms at the Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission, which had been in charge of searching Iraq for all unconventional arms, save the nuclear ones.

    In April, diplomats said, the commission’s acting chief weapons inspector, Demetrius Perricos, lodged an objection with the United States mission to the United Nations over the document that dealt with the nerve agents tabun and sarin.

    Soon, the document vanished from the Web site. On June 8, diplomats said, Mr. Perricos told the Security Council of how risky arms information had shown up on a public Web site and how his agency appreciated the American cooperation in resolving the matter.

    In September, the Web site began posting the nuclear documents, and some soon raised concerns. On Sept. 12, it posted a document it called “Progress of Iraqi nuclear program circa 1995.” That description is potentially misleading since the research occurred years earlier.

    The Iraqi document is marked “Draft FFCD Version 3 (20.12.95),” meaning it was preparatory for the “Full, Final, Complete Disclosure” that Iraq made to United Nations inspectors in March 1996. The document carries three diagrams showing cross sections of bomb cores, and their diameters.

    On Sept. 20, the site posted a much larger document, “Summary of technical achievements of Iraq’s former nuclear program.” It runs to 51 pages, 18 focusing on the development of Iraq’s bomb design. Topics included physical theory, the atomic core and high-explosive experiments. By early October, diplomats and officials said, United Nations arms inspectors in New York and their counterparts in Vienna were alarmed and discussing what to do.

    Last week in Vienna, Olli J. Heinonen, head of safeguards at the international atomic agency, expressed concern about the documents to the American ambassador, Gregory L. Schulte, diplomats said.

    Calls to Mr. Schulte’s spokesman yesterday were not returned.
    ....as the Repubs try to look to their mouthpieces for a reply!!!!! That's what they are doing, waiting till RuShit Limpbough gives them the words to reply to this!!
    To announce that there must be no criticism of the president, or that we are to stand by the president right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American Public." - Theodore Roosevelt

  3. #3
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    < yawn > it's a non-issue

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by FrankBooth
    < yawn > it's a non-issue
    No Phatboy

    this is possibly the most significant topic on this page.

  5. #5
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    oh i see you wanna start something eh Walt....



    so....

    aaarrrreeeee yyyyooooouuuu rrrrrreeeeeaaaaaddddyyy tttttoooo RuMbLE ?!?!?!?!?

  6. #6
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    Leave Walt alone

    He is living in Platoís cave and canít help it

  7. #7
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    for some reason when i envision Walt at his pc tapping away i get this song stuck in my head...

    Supertramp - Dreamer Lyrics

    Dreamer, you know you are a dreamer
    Well can you put your hands in your head, oh no!
    I said dreamer, you're nothing but a dreamer
    Well can you put your hands in your head, oh no!
    I said "Far out, - What a day, a year, a laugh it is!"
    You know, - Well you know you had it comin' to you,
    Now there's not a lot I can do

    Dreamer, you stupid little dreamer;
    So now you put your head in your hands, oh no!
    I said "Far out, - What a day, a year, a laugh it is!"
    You know, - Well you know you had it comin' to you,
    Now there's not a lot I can do.

    Well work it out someday

    If I could see something
    You can see anything you want boy
    If I could be someone-
    You can be anyone, celebrate boy.
    If I could do something-
    Well you can do something,
    If I could do anything-
    Well can you do something out of this world?

    Take a dream on a Sunday
    Take a life, take a holiday
    Take a lie, take a dreamer
    dream, dream, dream, dream, dream along...

    Dreamer, you know you are a dreamer
    Well can you put your hands in your head, oh no!
    I said dreamer, you're nothing but a dreamer
    Well can you put your hands in your head, oh no!
    OH NO!

  8. #8
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    And what music is brought to mind by reading Frankie's contributions to F=88??

    Not as popular as Boots and Braces, but Skrewdriver does cover it all...

    White Power by Skrewdriver (just substitute America and Texas for England and Britain)

    White power 1-2-3-4!
    I stand watch my country, going down the drain
    We are all at fault, we are all to blame
    We're letting them takeover, we just let 'em come
    Once we had an Empire, and now we've got a slum
    Chorus:
    White Power! For England
    White Power! Today
    White Power! For Britain
    Before it gets too late
    Well we've seen a lot of riots, we just sit and scoff
    We've seen a lot of muggings, and the judges let 'em off
    (Repeat Chorus)
    Well we've gotta do something, to try and stop the rot
    And the traitors that have used us, they should all be shot
    (Repeat Chorus)
    Middle Eight:
    Are we gonna sit and let them come?
    Have they got the White man on the run?
    Multi-racial society is a mess
    We ain't gonna take much more of this
    What do we need?
    (Repeat Chorus)
    Well if we don't win our battle, and all does not go well
    It's apocalypse for Britain, and we'll see you all in hell
    (Repeat Chorus) x2
    "The search for a perfect pint should take lifetime." M.Jackson

    Ride bikes, not goats. Just good advice

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by FrankBooth
    for some reason when i envision Walt at his pc tapping away i get this song stuck in my head...

    Supertramp - Dreamer Lyrics
    Pansy. SuperPansy, in fact.

  10. #10
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    oh hell no my theme song is something like this diddy from Pantera

    Walk

    Can't you see I'm easily bothered by persistence
    One step from lashing out at you...
    You want in to get under my skin
    And call yourself a friend
    I've got more friends like you
    What do I do?

    [Pre]
    Is there no standard anymore?
    What it takes, who I am, where I've been
    Belong
    You can't be something you're not
    Be yourself, by yourself
    Stay away from me
    A lesson learned in life
    Known from the dawn of time

    [Chorus]
    Respect, walk

    Run your mouth when I'm not around
    It's easy to achieve
    You cry to weak friends that sympathize
    Can you hear the violins playing you song?
    Those same friends tell me your every word

    [Pre]

    [Chorus]

    Are you talking to me?
    No way punk

  11. #11
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    Good job! Frank

    Quote Originally Posted by FrankBooth
    oh hell no my theme song is something like this diddy from Pantera

    Walk

    Can't you see I'm easily bothered by persistence
    One step from lashing out at you...
    You want in to get under my skin
    And call yourself a friend
    I've got more friends like you
    What do I do?

    [Pre]
    Is there no standard anymore?
    What it takes, who I am, where I've been
    Belong
    You can't be something you're not
    Be yourself, by yourself
    Stay away from me
    A lesson learned in life
    Known from the dawn of time

    [Chorus]
    Respect, walk

    Run your mouth when I'm not around
    It's easy to achieve
    You cry to weak friends that sympathize
    Can you hear the violins playing you song?
    Those same friends tell me your every word

    [Pre]

    [Chorus]

    Are you talking to me?
    No way punk
    That song is awsome!!!
    To announce that there must be no criticism of the president, or that we are to stand by the president right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American Public." - Theodore Roosevelt

  12. #12
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    Frank,

    Here's some lyrics from a good old Texas band, the Austin Lounge Lizards, that you should adopt as your own:

    Life is hard, but life is hardest when you're dumb
    No joie de vivre, just endless hours of tedium
    With a negative IQ you'll be lonesome sad and blue
    Life is hard, but life is hardest when you're dumb

    Life is hard, but life is hardest when you're dumb
    You wait for years, but inspiration never comes
    Thoughts you don't have remain unheard because you cannot find the words
    Life is hard, but life is hardest when you're dumb

    Life is hard, but life is hardest when you're dumb
    Between your ears a dark and silent vacuum
    If there's a void behind your face
    why not rent out the vacant space
    Life is hard, but life is hardest when you're dumb

    Life is hard, but life is hardest when you're dumb
    Why not just lay back and smoke a bowl of opium
    If being stupid is your fate just relax 'cause it's too late
    Life is hard, but life is hardest when you're dumb

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wasatch Walt
    Republicans: They were for posting the recipe for nuclear weapons on the web for the convenience of terrorists before they were against it.

    Pretty sure this is the same material sandan was going to go over to find where Saddam hid his WMDs.

    Never heard back about that, though.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by BadHabit
    Pretty sure this is the same material sandan was going to go over to find where Saddam hid his WMDs.

    Never heard back about that, though.
    I don't think there is a PNAC, Bush, NeoCon lure you could cast that wouldn't receive and instant bite from Sanddamn.

    He is a starved bluegill in a predator free pond.

    He will hit at anything.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wasatch Walt
    ...starved bluegill...
    *laugh* filed for future unattributed use

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