Page 5 of 8 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 LastLast
Results 101 to 125 of 195
  1. #101
    OriginalDonk
    Reputation: OriginalDonk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    233
    Good to hear you've got it sorted SP. So are you crossing your rear derailleur and dropper post cables inside the internal routing segment or am I reading your post wrong?

  2. #102
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6,221
    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    Vik I finally got my routing dialed. You have to have the cables come out of the internal routing on the same side as they mount on the yoke and then they should be tight, but not stretched when the suspension is fully extended. I am actually very satisfied with it now and I don't even have the standoff mounted for the rear brake. It also stopped rubbing on the rear shock by the yoke as well. My travel has been perfect with 145 PSI (200 lb rider weight with camelback etc). That is including the 3-5' drops we were hitting today. I was using 99% of the travel without knocking the o-ring off the shaft.

    Also, if you are rubbing the yoke there it might be the cables knocking the o-ring off and not the fact you are using all of the travel.
    I'm not sure we are having the same cable issues. My cables aren't too tight. They are the correct length for the frame when the suspension is unloaded. The problem is when the suspension compresses the 2.5" of the shock's stroke the cables are too long so they need to bend somewhere to account for the shorter distance. This movement thousands of times a ride rubs various parts of the bike.

    The cables are "internal" to the frame for less than 12" for that dubious benefit you get a lot of hassles that I can see as worth it. Particularly when a clean external routing would solve all of them.

    But that's just me. I've never looked at my Nomad and thought "Gosh if only those cables were hidden for 12" in the TT this would be a way more rocking bike"

    Now that I have figured out all the rub spots and covered them with some abrasion protection it's not a problem. Next time I have an excuse to redo the cables & housing I'll just run both externally with stick on cables guides.

    I'm not bottoming out the shock anymore now that I have added some air, but it's not very plush. I'm not concerned about the 0-ring. I'm judging the bottoming out when the shock physically hits the end of its travel which you can feel pretty distinctly.

    The bike is working fine like this. It's not overly stiff so that it's losing traction on slippery climbs, but I'd like to try softening both ends just for comfort sake. I think the Pike will ramp up nicely I just need to add the volume spacer to the Float X to make it perform similarly.

    The stock suspension on the Mach 6 is working better than the stock suspension on the Nomad. I suspect it will be awesome with a trip to Avalanche.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  3. #103
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6,221
    Got in an epic-ly wet/muddy ride on some really steep techy terrain yesterday. Worse than the ride that I posted about earlier that had me ordering some Hans Damfs as soon as I got home.

    It was gnarly enough that had we not just driven an hour to meet 7 other riders we would have bailed.

    It was interesting to see how the M6 performed. I was pretty apprehensive as I have only ridden these trails once before on the Nomad last summer when they weren't uber muddy. I was prepared to just hand on and survive without much fun being had.

    I have to say the bike and the tires rocked. I couldn't believe how much I could trust the HDs in the mud, roots and slick rocks. I kept pushing them and pushing them with zero drama. As long as they last months not weeks I've found my new favourite tire...

    The short wheelbase of the M6 was really nice on the many tight switchbacks with decent drop offs should I fail to make the turn.

    My suspension is on the firmer side, but traction up and down was not an issue. Taking a bad line and slamming the Pike into a hole or having to land the front of the bike heavy/brake and then turn was so easy it almost made me lazy. The Pike doesn't brake dive and always seems to get back up in its travel fast so it's ready for my next mistake.

    I'm happy to report the M6 rose to the challenge and made tough conditions seem easy.

    I'm excited about heading back to those trails in drier conditions and being able to push the bike even harder.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  4. #104
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Salespunk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,812
    Quote Originally Posted by OriginalDonk View Post
    Good to hear you've got it sorted SP. So are you crossing your rear derailleur and dropper post cables inside the internal routing segment or am I reading your post wrong?
    Haven't really thought about if they are crossed internally, but they are. I don't even pay attention to the dropper post since there is no cable movement. I have found that the first time I sit on the bike for a ride I have to push the brake line across so that it bends the other way, but after that it stays there. That includes times after the bike fully unloads for jumps or drops. The only place the cables rub now is the top of the shock where they exit the frame and I don't think this can be avoided. My cables are tight when the suspension is fully extended.

  5. #105
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6,221


    The GF happy that her Hans Damfs arrived last night...

    She could only find the less sticky Pacestar compound so I'm going to give her one of my Trailstar HDs and we'll each run a sticky HD up front and a harder wearing HD in the rear.



    The creaking from my Mach 6's yoke/shock interface has reached epic proportions after Sunday's uber muddy ride. I'm going to have to tackle the fix tonight. Video below shows what to do if you've got the same issue. Looks fairly simple.



    I got in a XX1 dropout spacer that I need to glue into my frame to get some more clearance for the chain in the smallest cog.



    The last Canadian team is playing in the Stanley Cup tonight so I'm stopping at the beer store on the way home...wrenching and hockey needs some fuel...
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  6. #106
    mtbr member
    Reputation: turfnsurf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    189
    Wish you luck on all of that. Our SJ Sharks lost 4 straight after going up 3-0! How does that happen?

  7. #107
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6,221
    Quote Originally Posted by turfnsurf View Post
    Wish you luck on all of that. Our SJ Sharks lost 4 straight after going up 3-0! How does that happen?
    I take full responsibility for that.

    I watched every SJ-LA game and was cheering for SJ.

    So this time I am cheering for Boston instead of Montreal!
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  8. #108
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wilks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,622

    Vik's Mach 6 Builds

    The trailstar HD on the rear whilst excellent in the rocks and roots lasts about 10 seconds. You're probably better off with the Pacestar.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #109
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6,221
    Quote Originally Posted by wilks View Post
    The trailstar HD on the rear whilst excellent in the rocks and roots lasts about 10 seconds. You're probably better off with the Pacestar.
    I haven't noticed any unusual wear so far with softer HDs and they impressed the heck out of me for wet/muddy conditions in my part of coastal BC.

    I'll be running them next winter unless I come across a better option.

    Things are starting to dry out well and we get next to no rain June-Aug so traction isn't going to be an issue until the fall. So the Pacestar compound should be just fine.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  10. #110
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5
    Vik,

    I love your build! I'm about to pull the trigger on starting a very similar build. I was wondering how you like your LB rims? I was thinking about using the slightly thinner ones (30mm) instead of the ones that you used (35mm). I am a little smaller than you I think (5'6", 130 lbs). Not sure tho...

    I was also wondering if you had considered using a different cable routing instead of the internals... like using the stick-on guides along the downtube that someone had posted about on one of these threads?

  11. #111
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6,221
    Quote Originally Posted by Kahu8 View Post
    Vik,

    I love your build! I'm about to pull the trigger on starting a very similar build. I was wondering how you like your LB rims? I was thinking about using the slightly thinner ones (30mm) instead of the ones that you used (35mm). I am a little smaller than you I think (5'6", 130 lbs). Not sure tho...

    I was also wondering if you had considered using a different cable routing instead of the internals... like using the stick-on guides along the downtube that someone had posted about on one of these threads?
    So far the LB rims are great. Light, stiff and setup tubeless easier than any other rim I have used. Out of my riding buddies 4 of us are on them and everyone is happy.

    For width of rim I would match it to the width of tire to plan to use. Wide tire = wide rim.

    My GF is your height and 120lbs and has been riding 35mm wide rims on her Nomad with 2.4" tires and loves them.

    If I was buying more rims I would give LB my business.



    This is the cable routing I'm going to use next time I have an excuse to pull my shift/brake cable/housing.

    I've bought some stick on cable guides so it won't look bad.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  12. #112
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    378
    I haven't experienced any of the cable issues you have. Granted, I see the cables bow out a bit while riding, but that is it. They don't rub against my legs or doing anything that would frustrate me. I put a bit of protection tape around that area to prevent cable rub and that is it. I came from a 2010 and 2012 Spec Enduro. I think I would rather have the cables bow out up top compared to all the cables being under the bottom bracket. Granted, I never had an issue, but was always worried about cables getting ripped off or severed under there.

    BTW, very happy with my Neo Moto tires. I don't know if it is the bike, the Derby rims, the Pike, or the tires, but my traction and cornering has been fantastic on this new bike. I rode some pretty good mud and wetness on Sunday and traction was great.

  13. #113
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6,221


    Hans Damfs installed on GFs M6. Stock DT Swiss rims setup tubeless easily.



    Glued in the XX1 spacer using Seam Seal on my bike.



    Spacer doing its job. Providing clearance for the chain in the smallest XX1 cog.



    This small protective guard was coming off at both ends so I glued it back on with shoe glue.

    Worked late so I'll save the creak busting for Saturday. Night ride planned for Friday and Saturday looks wet. I've had enough mud riding so I'm going to give it a miss.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  14. #114
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6,221


    Due to rain we took a day off today and I set out to stop a loud repetitive squeak on the Mach 6.

    I followed the instructions in the video I posted above and used Stan's tape to isolate the shock body from the carbon yoke.

    So far so good. I can't make the bike squeak.

    The downside is the hack looks pretty budget, but I can't stand a noisy bike. I'm going to ride it for a while and see if the bike stays quiet when it gets dirty. If it does I'll look for a solution that's long term and looks nicer.

    I tried trimming the tape more before installing the shock back into the yoke, but I couldn't get the tape to stay in place.

    If anyone has done this with better results I'd love to hear what you did.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  15. #115
    mtbr member
    Reputation: turfnsurf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    189
    Yeah, kinda makes a *****in bike look a little ghetto. I had the clunking noise right after building mine up, saw the video but wasn't stoked about the fix. Ended up cleaning & lightly greasing both ends of the shock mount and using Lok-tite and slightly under-torquing mounting bolts. It seemed to me hardware was slightly over-torqued at the factory, causing a friction related clunk. Whatever the case, I've been noise free for a month now

  16. #116
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    102
    Vik, didn't watch the video so I might be wrong, but looks like thin nylon or Delron(brand name) washers of the right diameter would work. Most good hardware stores in the states have a good selection. Don't know about Canada

  17. #117
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Salespunk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,812
    Vik, your cables look like they are routed the same way mine were at first where I was getting rub everywhere. This is my latest setup that is working really well with zero rub beyond the top of the shock.





    You can see that they are very short and directly routed instead of crossed anywhere. I do have to push the brakeline over so that it bows to the left when I first get on the bike sometimes, but only once. Hope this helps.

  18. #118
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6,221
    My cables are routed the on the same side as yours SP. I cross them so they bow inwards rather than outwards which I found annoying.

    I've got the cable rub in check with protective tape and such.

    If I was going to spend energy dealing with the cables I'd just pull them and run them on the DT, but it's not worth the effort at the moment.

    Thanks for posting photos...
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  19. #119
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6,221
    Quote Originally Posted by turfnsurf View Post
    Yeah, kinda makes a *****in bike look a little ghetto. I had the clunking noise right after building mine up, saw the video but wasn't stoked about the fix. Ended up cleaning & lightly greasing both ends of the shock mount and using Lok-tite and slightly under-torquing mounting bolts. It seemed to me hardware was slightly over-torqued at the factory, causing a friction related clunk. Whatever the case, I've been noise free for a month now
    Good to know. I'm not excited about making my M6 look ghetto. OTOH the creak/squeak was worse!

    When my volume reducers show up I'll have to pull the Float X again so I'll ride it like it is for now to verify the squeak has been tamed.

    When I reinstall my Float X I'll either try a neater Stan's tape hack or just clean and lube like you did and not tighten the hardware down as much.

    We are headed into the dry season so I might get away with that until fall.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  20. #120
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    689

    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post


    I'll have a review of these wheels ready at the end of the summer. The one person I know that rides ENVE and LB rims says he can't tell the difference between them.



    At $200/each delivered for LB rims and great warranty support from LB I can't see the value in ENVEs.



    I currently run 35mm wide Velocity rims so I know I like the width.

    The LB rims also setup tubeless easier than any other rim I have worked with including Stan's.


    Great bike there vikb, and i am really tempted to try these wide carbon rims- unlike so many ******** advertising claims i can actually agree with the common sense logic on the benefit of wider rims.

    One thing to note is on a traditional wheel build is that the spokes on the front wheel with elbows out should be facing forwards. And on the rear wheel- elbows out facing forward on the disc side and rearward on the drive side. Ofcourse wheels will still work if not laced this way, and i have a few, but that is the correct way.

    There is a company at Bicycle Frame Protection | Invisiframe who provide quality frame protection kits pre cut to particular frames (and even different sizes) and they make one for the Mach 6. Not sure if you knew about them or not. I used them for a recent frame, and i would again.
    You can't make a racehorse out of a donkey, but you can make a fast donkey.

  21. #121
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    118

    Vik's Mach 6 Builds

    Two thumbs up for the LB (Light Bicycle) carbon rims. I have the 29'er hookless AM version (not the 35mm ones). They were perfect on delivery. Have 5 rides on them so far. Awesome.Vik's Mach 6 Builds-imageuploadedbytapatalk1399386816.205143.jpgVik's Mach 6 Builds-imageuploadedbytapatalk1399386827.774907.jpg

  22. #122
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Salespunk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,812
    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    My cables are routed the on the same side as yours SP. I cross them so they bow inwards rather than outwards which I found annoying.

    I've got the cable rub in check with protective tape and such.

    If I was going to spend energy dealing with the cables I'd just pull them and run them on the DT, but it's not worth the effort at the moment.

    Thanks for posting photos...
    Was just looking at the photos and it seems like you have a lot more slack in yours like I used to as well. With the brake line you can just yank the extra slack out, but the RD housing would have to be trimmed. Probably a 10 minute job since you don't have to pull the wire though the frame to do it.

  23. #123
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6,221
    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    Was just looking at the photos and it seems like you have a lot more slack in yours like I used to as well. With the brake line you can just yank the extra slack out, but the RD housing would have to be trimmed. Probably a 10 minute job since you don't have to pull the wire though the frame to do it.
    The dérailleur housing is pretty much tight. Just enough slack I can get the rear swing arm back when I remove the shock. The brake has more slack, but that was to get it headed across the shock so it bowed out the other way and not into my legs. I could make it tighter, but then it would bump into the dérailleur housing and not move across to the other side of the bike.

    If I am pulling the wire through the frame I'll route both on the downtube and be done with cable hassles for the life of the bike.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  24. #124
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6,221


    Thanks Turfnsurf for sending me a bunch of counter sunk bolts. Fits perfectly and looks nicer than the button head bolt I was using...

    I'll include one with each cover I send out from here on. Nice work Team Pivot....
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  25. #125
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6,221
    A few notes from recent rides:

    - Stan's tape applied as per video linked to above has totally banished creak
    - I've wrapped the front end of the yoke in black electrical tape...still f-Ugly, but I can't see it from 5' away so it's better
    - collected some small gravel in the rock grinder aka top of lower linkage
    - lizard skins protective tape prevented most of the damage and I have added one more piece to bolster my defences down there
    - Hans Damf rear tire likes to grab gravel and rub it on inside of CS
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

Page 5 of 8 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-13-2013, 10:04 AM
  2. Replies: 26
    Last Post: 09-27-2013, 01:55 PM
  3. Mach 4 and Mach 5.7 Frame Weights? (Alloy)
    By ccarbot in forum Pivot Cycles
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 07-07-2013, 04:58 PM
  4. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-18-2013, 10:44 PM
  5. another sizing question Mach 5.7 vs mach 5.
    By snoroqc in forum Pivot Cycles
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-11-2012, 12:43 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •