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  1. #101
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    Good to hear you've got it sorted SP. So are you crossing your rear derailleur and dropper post cables inside the internal routing segment or am I reading your post wrong?

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    Vik I finally got my routing dialed. You have to have the cables come out of the internal routing on the same side as they mount on the yoke and then they should be tight, but not stretched when the suspension is fully extended. I am actually very satisfied with it now and I don't even have the standoff mounted for the rear brake. It also stopped rubbing on the rear shock by the yoke as well. My travel has been perfect with 145 PSI (200 lb rider weight with camelback etc). That is including the 3-5' drops we were hitting today. I was using 99% of the travel without knocking the o-ring off the shaft.

    Also, if you are rubbing the yoke there it might be the cables knocking the o-ring off and not the fact you are using all of the travel.
    I'm not sure we are having the same cable issues. My cables aren't too tight. They are the correct length for the frame when the suspension is unloaded. The problem is when the suspension compresses the 2.5" of the shock's stroke the cables are too long so they need to bend somewhere to account for the shorter distance. This movement thousands of times a ride rubs various parts of the bike.

    The cables are "internal" to the frame for less than 12" for that dubious benefit you get a lot of hassles that I can see as worth it. Particularly when a clean external routing would solve all of them.

    But that's just me. I've never looked at my Nomad and thought "Gosh if only those cables were hidden for 12" in the TT this would be a way more rocking bike"

    Now that I have figured out all the rub spots and covered them with some abrasion protection it's not a problem. Next time I have an excuse to redo the cables & housing I'll just run both externally with stick on cables guides.

    I'm not bottoming out the shock anymore now that I have added some air, but it's not very plush. I'm not concerned about the 0-ring. I'm judging the bottoming out when the shock physically hits the end of its travel which you can feel pretty distinctly.

    The bike is working fine like this. It's not overly stiff so that it's losing traction on slippery climbs, but I'd like to try softening both ends just for comfort sake. I think the Pike will ramp up nicely I just need to add the volume spacer to the Float X to make it perform similarly.

    The stock suspension on the Mach 6 is working better than the stock suspension on the Nomad. I suspect it will be awesome with a trip to Avalanche.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  3. #103
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    Got in an epic-ly wet/muddy ride on some really steep techy terrain yesterday. Worse than the ride that I posted about earlier that had me ordering some Hans Damfs as soon as I got home.

    It was gnarly enough that had we not just driven an hour to meet 7 other riders we would have bailed.

    It was interesting to see how the M6 performed. I was pretty apprehensive as I have only ridden these trails once before on the Nomad last summer when they weren't uber muddy. I was prepared to just hand on and survive without much fun being had.

    I have to say the bike and the tires rocked. I couldn't believe how much I could trust the HDs in the mud, roots and slick rocks. I kept pushing them and pushing them with zero drama. As long as they last months not weeks I've found my new favourite tire...

    The short wheelbase of the M6 was really nice on the many tight switchbacks with decent drop offs should I fail to make the turn.

    My suspension is on the firmer side, but traction up and down was not an issue. Taking a bad line and slamming the Pike into a hole or having to land the front of the bike heavy/brake and then turn was so easy it almost made me lazy. The Pike doesn't brake dive and always seems to get back up in its travel fast so it's ready for my next mistake.

    I'm happy to report the M6 rose to the challenge and made tough conditions seem easy.

    I'm excited about heading back to those trails in drier conditions and being able to push the bike even harder.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by OriginalDonk View Post
    Good to hear you've got it sorted SP. So are you crossing your rear derailleur and dropper post cables inside the internal routing segment or am I reading your post wrong?
    Haven't really thought about if they are crossed internally, but they are. I don't even pay attention to the dropper post since there is no cable movement. I have found that the first time I sit on the bike for a ride I have to push the brake line across so that it bends the other way, but after that it stays there. That includes times after the bike fully unloads for jumps or drops. The only place the cables rub now is the top of the shock where they exit the frame and I don't think this can be avoided. My cables are tight when the suspension is fully extended.

  5. #105
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    The GF happy that her Hans Damfs arrived last night...

    She could only find the less sticky Pacestar compound so I'm going to give her one of my Trailstar HDs and we'll each run a sticky HD up front and a harder wearing HD in the rear.



    The creaking from my Mach 6's yoke/shock interface has reached epic proportions after Sunday's uber muddy ride. I'm going to have to tackle the fix tonight. Video below shows what to do if you've got the same issue. Looks fairly simple.



    I got in a XX1 dropout spacer that I need to glue into my frame to get some more clearance for the chain in the smallest cog.



    The last Canadian team is playing in the Stanley Cup tonight so I'm stopping at the beer store on the way home...wrenching and hockey needs some fuel...
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  6. #106
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    Wish you luck on all of that. Our SJ Sharks lost 4 straight after going up 3-0! How does that happen?

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by turfnsurf View Post
    Wish you luck on all of that. Our SJ Sharks lost 4 straight after going up 3-0! How does that happen?
    I take full responsibility for that.

    I watched every SJ-LA game and was cheering for SJ.

    So this time I am cheering for Boston instead of Montreal!
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  8. #108
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    Vik's Mach 6 Builds

    The trailstar HD on the rear whilst excellent in the rocks and roots lasts about 10 seconds. You're probably better off with the Pacestar.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by wilks View Post
    The trailstar HD on the rear whilst excellent in the rocks and roots lasts about 10 seconds. You're probably better off with the Pacestar.
    I haven't noticed any unusual wear so far with softer HDs and they impressed the heck out of me for wet/muddy conditions in my part of coastal BC.

    I'll be running them next winter unless I come across a better option.

    Things are starting to dry out well and we get next to no rain June-Aug so traction isn't going to be an issue until the fall. So the Pacestar compound should be just fine.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  10. #110
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    Vik,

    I love your build! I'm about to pull the trigger on starting a very similar build. I was wondering how you like your LB rims? I was thinking about using the slightly thinner ones (30mm) instead of the ones that you used (35mm). I am a little smaller than you I think (5'6", 130 lbs). Not sure tho...

    I was also wondering if you had considered using a different cable routing instead of the internals... like using the stick-on guides along the downtube that someone had posted about on one of these threads?

  11. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kahu8 View Post
    Vik,

    I love your build! I'm about to pull the trigger on starting a very similar build. I was wondering how you like your LB rims? I was thinking about using the slightly thinner ones (30mm) instead of the ones that you used (35mm). I am a little smaller than you I think (5'6", 130 lbs). Not sure tho...

    I was also wondering if you had considered using a different cable routing instead of the internals... like using the stick-on guides along the downtube that someone had posted about on one of these threads?
    So far the LB rims are great. Light, stiff and setup tubeless easier than any other rim I have used. Out of my riding buddies 4 of us are on them and everyone is happy.

    For width of rim I would match it to the width of tire to plan to use. Wide tire = wide rim.

    My GF is your height and 120lbs and has been riding 35mm wide rims on her Nomad with 2.4" tires and loves them.

    If I was buying more rims I would give LB my business.



    This is the cable routing I'm going to use next time I have an excuse to pull my shift/brake cable/housing.

    I've bought some stick on cable guides so it won't look bad.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  12. #112
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    I haven't experienced any of the cable issues you have. Granted, I see the cables bow out a bit while riding, but that is it. They don't rub against my legs or doing anything that would frustrate me. I put a bit of protection tape around that area to prevent cable rub and that is it. I came from a 2010 and 2012 Spec Enduro. I think I would rather have the cables bow out up top compared to all the cables being under the bottom bracket. Granted, I never had an issue, but was always worried about cables getting ripped off or severed under there.

    BTW, very happy with my Neo Moto tires. I don't know if it is the bike, the Derby rims, the Pike, or the tires, but my traction and cornering has been fantastic on this new bike. I rode some pretty good mud and wetness on Sunday and traction was great.

  13. #113
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    Hans Damfs installed on GFs M6. Stock DT Swiss rims setup tubeless easily.



    Glued in the XX1 spacer using Seam Seal on my bike.



    Spacer doing its job. Providing clearance for the chain in the smallest XX1 cog.



    This small protective guard was coming off at both ends so I glued it back on with shoe glue.

    Worked late so I'll save the creak busting for Saturday. Night ride planned for Friday and Saturday looks wet. I've had enough mud riding so I'm going to give it a miss.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  14. #114
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    Due to rain we took a day off today and I set out to stop a loud repetitive squeak on the Mach 6.

    I followed the instructions in the video I posted above and used Stan's tape to isolate the shock body from the carbon yoke.

    So far so good. I can't make the bike squeak.

    The downside is the hack looks pretty budget, but I can't stand a noisy bike. I'm going to ride it for a while and see if the bike stays quiet when it gets dirty. If it does I'll look for a solution that's long term and looks nicer.

    I tried trimming the tape more before installing the shock back into the yoke, but I couldn't get the tape to stay in place.

    If anyone has done this with better results I'd love to hear what you did.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  15. #115
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    Yeah, kinda makes a *****in bike look a little ghetto. I had the clunking noise right after building mine up, saw the video but wasn't stoked about the fix. Ended up cleaning & lightly greasing both ends of the shock mount and using Lok-tite and slightly under-torquing mounting bolts. It seemed to me hardware was slightly over-torqued at the factory, causing a friction related clunk. Whatever the case, I've been noise free for a month now

  16. #116
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    Vik, didn't watch the video so I might be wrong, but looks like thin nylon or Delron(brand name) washers of the right diameter would work. Most good hardware stores in the states have a good selection. Don't know about Canada

  17. #117
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    Vik, your cables look like they are routed the same way mine were at first where I was getting rub everywhere. This is my latest setup that is working really well with zero rub beyond the top of the shock.





    You can see that they are very short and directly routed instead of crossed anywhere. I do have to push the brakeline over so that it bows to the left when I first get on the bike sometimes, but only once. Hope this helps.

  18. #118
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    My cables are routed the on the same side as yours SP. I cross them so they bow inwards rather than outwards which I found annoying.

    I've got the cable rub in check with protective tape and such.

    If I was going to spend energy dealing with the cables I'd just pull them and run them on the DT, but it's not worth the effort at the moment.

    Thanks for posting photos...
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  19. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by turfnsurf View Post
    Yeah, kinda makes a *****in bike look a little ghetto. I had the clunking noise right after building mine up, saw the video but wasn't stoked about the fix. Ended up cleaning & lightly greasing both ends of the shock mount and using Lok-tite and slightly under-torquing mounting bolts. It seemed to me hardware was slightly over-torqued at the factory, causing a friction related clunk. Whatever the case, I've been noise free for a month now
    Good to know. I'm not excited about making my M6 look ghetto. OTOH the creak/squeak was worse!

    When my volume reducers show up I'll have to pull the Float X again so I'll ride it like it is for now to verify the squeak has been tamed.

    When I reinstall my Float X I'll either try a neater Stan's tape hack or just clean and lube like you did and not tighten the hardware down as much.

    We are headed into the dry season so I might get away with that until fall.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  20. #120
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post


    I'll have a review of these wheels ready at the end of the summer. The one person I know that rides ENVE and LB rims says he can't tell the difference between them.



    At $200/each delivered for LB rims and great warranty support from LB I can't see the value in ENVEs.



    I currently run 35mm wide Velocity rims so I know I like the width.

    The LB rims also setup tubeless easier than any other rim I have worked with including Stan's.


    Great bike there vikb, and i am really tempted to try these wide carbon rims- unlike so many ******** advertising claims i can actually agree with the common sense logic on the benefit of wider rims.

    One thing to note is on a traditional wheel build is that the spokes on the front wheel with elbows out should be facing forwards. And on the rear wheel- elbows out facing forward on the disc side and rearward on the drive side. Ofcourse wheels will still work if not laced this way, and i have a few, but that is the correct way.

    There is a company at Bicycle Frame Protection | Invisiframe who provide quality frame protection kits pre cut to particular frames (and even different sizes) and they make one for the Mach 6. Not sure if you knew about them or not. I used them for a recent frame, and i would again.
    You can't make a racehorse out of a donkey, but you can make a fast donkey.

  21. #121
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    Vik's Mach 6 Builds

    Two thumbs up for the LB (Light Bicycle) carbon rims. I have the 29'er hookless AM version (not the 35mm ones). They were perfect on delivery. Have 5 rides on them so far. Awesome.Vik's Mach 6 Builds-imageuploadedbytapatalk1399386816.205143.jpgVik's Mach 6 Builds-imageuploadedbytapatalk1399386827.774907.jpg

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    My cables are routed the on the same side as yours SP. I cross them so they bow inwards rather than outwards which I found annoying.

    I've got the cable rub in check with protective tape and such.

    If I was going to spend energy dealing with the cables I'd just pull them and run them on the DT, but it's not worth the effort at the moment.

    Thanks for posting photos...
    Was just looking at the photos and it seems like you have a lot more slack in yours like I used to as well. With the brake line you can just yank the extra slack out, but the RD housing would have to be trimmed. Probably a 10 minute job since you don't have to pull the wire though the frame to do it.

  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    Was just looking at the photos and it seems like you have a lot more slack in yours like I used to as well. With the brake line you can just yank the extra slack out, but the RD housing would have to be trimmed. Probably a 10 minute job since you don't have to pull the wire though the frame to do it.
    The dérailleur housing is pretty much tight. Just enough slack I can get the rear swing arm back when I remove the shock. The brake has more slack, but that was to get it headed across the shock so it bowed out the other way and not into my legs. I could make it tighter, but then it would bump into the dérailleur housing and not move across to the other side of the bike.

    If I am pulling the wire through the frame I'll route both on the downtube and be done with cable hassles for the life of the bike.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  24. #124
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    Thanks Turfnsurf for sending me a bunch of counter sunk bolts. Fits perfectly and looks nicer than the button head bolt I was using...

    I'll include one with each cover I send out from here on. Nice work Team Pivot....
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  25. #125
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    A few notes from recent rides:

    - Stan's tape applied as per video linked to above has totally banished creak
    - I've wrapped the front end of the yoke in black electrical tape...still f-Ugly, but I can't see it from 5' away so it's better
    - collected some small gravel in the rock grinder aka top of lower linkage
    - lizard skins protective tape prevented most of the damage and I have added one more piece to bolster my defences down there
    - Hans Damf rear tire likes to grab gravel and rub it on inside of CS
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  26. #126
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    With the return of summer conditions we've been riding lots lately. On yesterday's ride I had my first mechanical on the M6. As I have come to expect it happened at the furthest point in my ride in a remote part of the trail network just after I realized I had lost track of time and I would be late meeting the GF as she wrapped up her ladies ride.

    The shift cable came out of the XX1 derailleur a problem that's not usually a big deal to fix, but the design of the XX1 is a bit complicated with a pulley and 90 deg cable guide right close to the clamping bolt. So when the frayed cables got sucked into the works it didn't want to come out again.

    I got it sorted well enough to get me back to the truck, but I knew the cable had to be replaced with a big ride in the plans for the next day and a 3 day road trip next weekend. Of course that meant fooling around with the internal cable routing. So I decided no time like the present to ditch that foolishness and route the shift cable along the downtube.



    A few stick on cable guides and some fresh housing to the rescue. Installing the new cable this way was dead easy and the look of external cables has never caused me one second of unhappiness.



    Besides the goofiness of the internal cable routing at the front of the bike that makes it a PITA to install a fresh cable and then has the housing bowing outwards with the shock compressing the rear end of the bike is inexplicably setup so you don't run full housing and exposed a few inches of cable to the elements right by the rear wheel. I can't see how this benefits anyone and certainly not us folks in the PNW that ride all winter. The internal cable routing on this bike is pretty lame.

    I'm thinking about either drilling out the cable stops or just running the cable in full housing next to the stops and leaving them. Depends how I'm feeling next time I have to deal with installing a fresh cable.



    I left the rear brake hose as is for now. My mechanic just got the internal volume reducer kit in so we'll be pulling the shock this week and installing it. I'll route the brake hose the same as the shift cable along the DT.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  27. #127
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    Love your bike Vik... but I find it inexcusable that the designer really f&^ked up the internal cable routing... you should expect more for your dollars. And this goes for any manufacturer. If you are going to offer internal routing, get the damn thing right BEFORE production. I say this as I am currently waiting on the delivery of my first frame with internal routing, and it makes me a bit nervous to be honest. Not a Pivot.

  28. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by gretch View Post
    Love your bike Vik... but I find it inexcusable that the designer really f&^ked up the internal cable routing... you should expect more for your dollars. And this goes for any manufacturer. If you are going to offer internal routing, get the damn thing right BEFORE production. I say this as I am currently waiting on the delivery of my first frame with internal routing, and it makes me a bit nervous to be honest. Not a Pivot.
    On the plus side easily sorted with some stick on cable guides...

    I'm seem some reasonably well designed internal cable setups. Hopefully you get one on your new bike.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  29. #129
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    Awesome summer riding conditions on Vancouver Island today...
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  30. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post


    Awesome summer riding conditions on Vancouver Island today...
    Tzouhalem?

  31. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by gretch View Post
    Tzouhalem?
    Yup. Good eye.

    The weather was perfect today. Trails were empty as usual. One of the benefits of living on an island.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  32. #132
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    Like the look of the stick on guides and great trail pics too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Yup. Good eye.

    The weather was perfect today. Trails were empty as usual. One of the benefits of living on an island.
    I lived in Victoria from 1990-2010.... many great rides at the Zoo... if you ever leave the rock and head inland (West Kootenays) feel free to drop me a line for some riding. We'll get that Pivot nice and dirty for you...

  34. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    Like the look of the stick on guides and great trail pics too.
    Thanks. Jenson has the stick on guides and they are not permanent so if you try them out and change your mind you can just peel them off and go back to stock routing.

    After a winter of cool/moist riding it's nice to have 5 solid months of dry/warm shredding to enjoy.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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    Much better but really Pivot.....

    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post


    With the return of summer conditions we've been riding lots lately. On yesterday's ride I had my first mechanical on the M6. As I have come to expect it happened at the furthest point in my ride in a remote part of the trail network just after I realized I had lost track of time and I would be late meeting the GF as she wrapped up her ladies ride.

    The shift cable came out of the XX1 derailleur a problem that's not usually a big deal to fix, but the design of the XX1 is a bit complicated with a pulley and 90 deg cable guide right close to the clamping bolt. So when the frayed cables got sucked into the works it didn't want to come out again.

    I got it sorted well enough to get me back to the truck, but I knew the cable had to be replaced with a big ride in the plans for the next day and a 3 day road trip next weekend. Of course that meant fooling around with the internal cable routing. So I decided no time like the present to ditch that foolishness and route the shift cable along the downtube.



    A few stick on cable guides and some fresh housing to the rescue. Installing the new cable this way was dead easy and the look of external cables has never caused me one second of unhappiness.



    Besides the goofiness of the internal cable routing at the front of the bike that makes it a PITA to install a fresh cable and then has the housing bowing outwards with the shock compressing the rear end of the bike is inexplicably setup so you don't run full housing and exposed a few inches of cable to the elements right by the rear wheel. I can't see how this benefits anyone and certainly not us folks in the PNW that ride all winter. The internal cable routing on this bike is pretty lame.

    I'm thinking about either drilling out the cable stops or just running the cable in full housing next to the stops and leaving them. Depends how I'm feeling next time I have to deal with installing a fresh cable.



    I left the rear brake hose as is for now. My mechanic just got the internal volume reducer kit in so we'll be pulling the shock this week and installing it. I'll route the brake hose the same as the shift cable along the DT.
    Mann this routing is a mess.. Well at least Vic has improved on it. Ripley do yourself isolator, which mine lasted 6 rides and now creaks again, stick on frame guides and zip ties, and possibly drilling into my carbon frame. Vic I gotta hand it it to you for your ingenuity. PIVOT on the other hand should have waited to release this thing. BTW rode the new Nomad and it has plenty of space for a big rear tire, nice cable routing and no need for stans stape wrapped around the yolk(which wont last long) Anyone looking for a large Mach 6 frame cause mine is gonna b for sale soon

  36. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by stokerslo View Post
    BTW rode the new Nomad and it has plenty of space for a big rear tire, nice cable routing and no need for stans stape wrapped around the yolk(which wont last long) Anyone looking for a large Mach 6 frame cause mine is gonna b for sale soon
    My old bike is a Nomad Mk2 which I am still riding as my back up bike. It's a solid machine and I will give SC credit for getting the little details right. I really never had one lick of trouble with it in over 5yrs of hard use....4 of those years were year round seasons in the PNWet. Quiet, solid and reliable. Thanks Nomad!

    The new Nomad is too DH oriented for me although it looks nice if you have trails suited for it. At the moment the bike I'd buy in the SC line up would be the Bronson. Better yet I'd buy a Bro-Mad which [not shocking] would look a lot like my Nomad MK2 and my Mach 6.

    I need a well balanced bike that is as good going up and across as it is coming down.

    So far the Mach 6 fits that bill really well. I like the short CS and short WB for our tight twisty techy steep trails. The DW Link works great to stay efficient while managing rough terrain at speed. My body fits the slack STA shorter TT geo well and in fact I think I'd find the pedal to BB relationship on the steep STA bikes uncomfortable or end up jamming the saddle way back on the rails which often causes problems.

    The cable routing is silly, but easily fixed so that I can live with.

    I'm hoping the shock/yoke creak can be fixed for months at a time with the Stan's hack or something else. **fingers crossed**

    At the moment for my local riding I can't think of a bike I'd rather be on.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  37. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    My old bike is a Nomad Mk2 which I am still riding as my back up bike. It's a solid machine and I will give SC credit for getting the little details right. I really never had one lick of trouble with it in over 5yrs of hard use....4 of those years were year round seasons in the PNWet. Quiet, solid and reliable. Thanks Nomad!

    The new Nomad is too DH oriented for me although it looks nice if you have trails suited for it. At the moment the bike I'd buy in the SC line up would be the Bronson. Better yet I'd buy a Bro-Mad which [not shocking] would look a lot like my Nomad MK2 and my Mach 6.

    I need a well balanced bike that is as good going up and across as it is coming down.

    So far the Mach 6 fits that bill really well. I like the short CS and short WB for our tight twisty techy steep trails. The DW Link works great to stay efficient while managing rough terrain at speed. My body fits the slack STA shorter TT geo well and in fact I think I'd find the pedal to BB relationship on the steep STA bikes uncomfortable or end up jamming the saddle way back on the rails which often causes problems.

    The cable routing is silly, but easily fixed so that I can live with.

    I'm hoping the shock/yoke creak can be fixed for months at a time with the Stan's hack or something else. **fingers crossed**

    At the moment for my local riding I can't think of a bike I'd rather be on.
    I guess I have to agree in terms of what this bike is capable of. However I think what is putting me over the edge is the "insanely audible creak coming from the yolk/rear shock interface" I cant own a bike that creaks that way, it ruins the ride for me and friends. Judging by the fact that I have spent some time trying to fix the creak it doesnt last long. I regreased after the yolk isolator attempt failed after taking the rear susp apart cleaning etc. only to find it was from the yolk again. Sooo i rode it on 2 rides after regreasing and now the same creak is returning

  38. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by stokerslo View Post
    I guess I have to agree in terms of what this bike is capable of. However I think what is putting me over the edge is the "insanely audible creak coming from the yolk/rear shock interface" I cant own a bike that creaks that way, it ruins the ride for me and friends. Judging by the fact that I have spent some time trying to fix the creak it doesnt last long. I regreased after the yolk isolator attempt failed after taking the rear susp apart cleaning etc. only to find it was from the yolk again. Sooo i rode it on 2 rides after regreasing and now the same creak is returning
    I feel you on that. I'm going to try a few different ways to quell the noise. If I can't keep the bike quiet I won't keep it either.

    Although I'll give it at least until the new year because there really isn't another bike I want to buy right now and I'd like to see how other new models are shaking out.

    Funny. It's one issue I never thought about when buying a new bike. It's the little things.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  39. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I feel you on that. I'm going to try a few different ways to quell the noise. If I can't keep the bike quiet I won't keep it either.

    Although I'll give it at least until the new year because there really isn't another bike I want to buy right now and I'd like to see how other new models are shaking out.

    Funny. It's one issue I never thought about when buying a new bike. It's the little things.
    yup I'm there with u on that one. let me know what u come up with. You seem to be on the forefront of fixing problems on this bike.

    It does seem weird not many people have chimmed in on this creaky yolk issue. Ive seen the links to Ripley isolator noisy collet etc. but these didnt work for me.

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    So far, I haven't had any of the yolk creak. I do get some rattling of the KS Lev inside the frame, but that's about it. Guessing that it will start creaking at some point, but so far so good.

    Definitely can't say that I am happy with the cable routing, but I tried something and it seems to be working pretty well for me. First thing was got rid of the criss cross applesauce in front of the shock. It wasn't predictable when it cycled. I put the soft section of velcro on the upper shock before the can as others have mentioned. Then I stuck on two layers of thick felt that you put under chair legs, etc. I like it better than the Pivot standoffs that kept rotating out from the frame as the suspension cycled. Obviously you could use a number of different things to stick on instead of felt, but this seems to be more secure than the Pivot standoffs. Will probably shorten the cables a bit and cut the felt a little more carefully when I do it over, but you get the idea.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Vik's Mach 6 Builds-photo.jpg  


  41. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by stokerslo View Post
    yup I'm there with u on that one. let me know what u come up with. You seem to be on the forefront of fixing problems on this bike.

    It does seem weird not many people have chimmed in on this creaky yolk issue. Ive seen the links to Ripley isolator noisy collet etc. but these didnt work for me.
    I'm just copying ideas other folks have come up with. I take no credit for any of these "fixes".

    Well I think the wet riding we do in the PNW has a tendency to bring out issues that folks in drier areas don't experience or at least not as fast/bad.

    I'd love to hear about some golden bullet solution that sorts the creak out permanently.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  42. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by tadmcmichael View Post
    So far, I haven't had any of the yolk creak. I do get some rattling of the KS Lev inside the frame, but that's about it. Guessing that it will start creaking at some point, but so far so good.

    Definitely can't say that I am happy with the cable routing, but I tried something and it seems to be working pretty well for me. First thing was got rid of the criss cross applesauce in front of the shock. It wasn't predictable when it cycled. I put the soft section of velcro on the upper shock before the can as others have mentioned. Then I stuck on two layers of thick felt that you put under chair legs, etc. I like it better than the Pivot standoffs that kept rotating out from the frame as the suspension cycled. Obviously you could use a number of different things to stick on instead of felt, but this seems to be more secure than the Pivot standoffs. Will probably shorten the cables a bit and cut the felt a little more carefully when I do it over, but you get the idea.
    Good idea. The stand offs do tend to flop around.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  43. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I'm just copying ideas other folks have come up with. I take no credit for any of these "fixes".

    Well I think the wet riding we do in the PNW has a tendency to bring out issues that folks in drier areas don't experience or at least not as fast/bad.

    I'd love to hear about some golden bullet solution that sorts the creak out permanently.
    Well it just so happens you sent me a direct mount cover free of charge. That was a definite "fix" provided and thought up by you(no thanks to Pivot for not providing it on frame only purchases)

    As far as the creak goes somewhere I saw some thin Teflon washers, I think It was for an RC car. I may take a trip to the local hobby store or online for something tougher than Stans tape

  44. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by stokerslo View Post
    As far as the creak goes somewhere I saw some thin Teflon washers, I think It was for an RC car. I may take a trip to the local hobby store or online for something tougher than Stans tape
    Let us know how it works.

    I might try 3 layers of Stans tape and see if that works.

    Any thoughts on tightening the shock mounting bolt more or less to reduce the creak potential?
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  45. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Let us know how it works.

    I might try 3 layers of Stans tape and see if that works.

    Any thoughts on tightening the shock mounting bolt more or less to reduce the creak potential?
    I have messed with loosening the screw on the bottom it seems with it loose the noise goes away but once you snug it up its all over.

    I used 2 layers of tape on my first attempt and it was hard to fit it in the clevis. It seemed upon removal the tape slid a bit off the eyelet and judging by marks in that spot that was the case. Maybe one layer is the secret keep us posted

    It seems like it needs a snug washer or something maybe some Gorilla Glue JK im not that desperate yet

  46. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by stokerslo View Post
    I have messed with loosening the screw on the bottom it seems with it loose the noise goes away but once you snug it up its all over.

    Maybe one layer is the secret keep us posted
    Someone suggested permanent loctite and not tightening the bolt too much. Might be worth a try.

    I'm starting to get some noise after a few wet rides. It's still subtle, but I can hear it. So 1 layer of Stan's isn't the ultimate weapon.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  47. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by stokerslo View Post
    I have messed with loosening the screw on the bottom it seems with it loose the noise goes away but once you snug it up its all over.
    To clarify, my noise was more of a clunk than a creak. Mine was actually the front end of the shock though. I slightly under torqued the bolt and applied Blue Lok-Tite on the threads. It's probably been a month or more and it totally quieted my M-6 clunking noise. I haven't done anything to the clevis end except disassemble to install a Fox Spacer, then reassemble without the Stans fix.
    If you try it, I recommend applying the Lok-Tite to the female threads, to eliminate the possibility of getting Lok-Tite into the bushing surfaces.

  48. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by turfnsurf View Post
    To clarify, my noise was more of a clunk than a creak. Mine was actually the front end of the shock though. I slightly under torqued the bolt and applied Blue Lok-Tite on the threads. It's probably been a month or more and it totally quieted my M-6 clunking noise. I haven't done anything to the clevis end except disassemble to install a Fox Spacer, then reassemble without the Stans fix.
    If you try it, I recommend applying the Lok-Tite to the female threads, to eliminate the possibility of getting Lok-Tite into the bushing surfaces.
    My mistake. Thanks for clarifying.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  49. #149
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    I'm of the opinion that the creaking/clunk fix is more a function of applying loc-tite than the Stan's tape. By the way, check all of your pivot bolts. I had one outside of the clevis loosen up and cause some clunking.

  50. #150
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    Here is a yoke creak solution from Pivot from another thread I'll repost here since we've been talking about it. I'll give it a shot and throw some loctite in there for good measure.


    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Hey Pivot - any solutions to this shock to yoke creak problem for your customers?
    Quote Originally Posted by kenbentit View Post
    We actually changed the recommended torque setting on the clevis bolt from 15Nm up to 24Nm.
    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Thanks. That was found to mitigate the creaking of the shock to yoke interface or was it changed for another reason?
    Quote Originally Posted by kenbentit View Post
    Yeah, we found that even with the torque at 15Nm the shock to clevis interface wasn't tight enough. We experimented with higher settings and found 24Nm to be a good point.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  51. #151
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    Internal cables are history...



    I can live with the sight of some shift and brake housing on the DT.



    Installed the Float X volume reducer. This is the stock piece that came out of the shock the one that got installed is about twice the volume and there is an even bigger spacer that I didn't install if I want even more ramp up.



    I've got a 3 day MTB camping trip planned for the weekend so I can test it out properly.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  52. #152
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    Not a very exciting photo from the weekend, but there was too much riding happening so this is the only photo I have of me on my bike in Cumberland, BC.

    Amazing trails if you can make it there and super friendly locals - thanks Jerry [MTBR member] for showing us around.

    Got to ride the M6 in much faster more open terrain with lots of jumps, bridges and other features to attack. This let me see a whole different side of the Mach 6. It was definitely at home hammering really hard down gnarly lines. Getting my weight back and riding that rear wheel was fun and made short work of anything that came around the corner.

    The Float X with the bigger volume reducer was excellent. I didn't bottom out no matter how hard I charged rough section or landed jumps. It's well matched to the Pike now.

    The tighter 24NM rear shock mount has stayed quiet despite a lot of wet/gritty rough riding.

    The only issue I had was a puncture on the tread of my rear Hans Damf when I was riding through an extended rocky section fast getting as much air as I could. One of the landings was too much for it and it started spewing Stan's. I got it sealed, but in the process of adding air back to the tire we managed to break the Presta valve - twice! Totally operator error. I fired in a tube and was good the rest of the weekend. I'll be adding a spare Stan's valve stem to my hydro pack tool kit. And I'll be more careful. We were rushing so we wouldn't hold up the group and ended up causing a bigger delay. Doh!

    Last day of riding on Monday I got to ride with a new Mach 6 owner on his very first ride. Nice looking stealth black M6. That's my first sighting of a M6 in the wild at home on Vancouver Island.

    Anyways - I'm now satisfied with the performance and fit of the M6 to the point where I won't mess with it for the rest of the summer. Time to wear some parts out.

    Great riding bike. Well balanced. Ready for anything I'm going to throw at it.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  53. #153
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    I guess I'll have to get a volume spacer kit to try out! I installed one on my last Enduro and it helped, but that suspension needed a lot of help. I would agree Vik, this bike loves very fast descents and speed. Very friendly on steep and fast lines. Thanks for the update.

  54. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by dawgman25 View Post
    I guess I'll have to get a volume spacer kit to try out! I installed one on my last Enduro and it helped, but that suspension needed a lot of help.
    I didn't feel any downside to installing the spacer and the ramp up at the end of the stroke is nice if you are a bigger guy. I start at ~180lbs before clothes and gear.

    It's easy to swap and you get a lot of spacers with the kit so you can fine tune your shock.

    I'm still going to send the Float X to Avy at the end of the summer when I tear down the bike for a full overhaul.

    Quote Originally Posted by dawgman25 View Post
    I would agree Vik, this bike loves very fast descents and speed. Very friendly on steep and fast lines.
    My local riding is very techy slower speed stuff. We have steep sustained DHs, but they end up being so tight that you don't get high speeds.

    It's also very slippery a lot of the year so I run low pressure [19-20/20-22psi front/rear] and I think I paid for it on this trip. Next time I'll add some air when shuttling [rarely do that].
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  55. #155
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    Bike staying quiet and rear tire plug keeping the air in.

    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  56. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post


    Bike staying quiet and rear tire plug keeping the air in.

    Very nice thread and A+ build bike looks awesome. Nice seeing U wearing elbow pads. I learned my lesson couple weeks ago ridin the boo. I am 47 now and crashes, they hurt much more now for some reason. Vik's Mach 6 Builds-20140419_122744.jpg this is going to be ***** to heal that little white dot in the middle it is my elbow bone.

    Cheers
    "My GREATEST FEAR is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my watches for what I told her I paid for them."

  57. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by pvflyer View Post
    Very nice thread and A+ build bike looks awesome. Nice seeing U wearing elbow pads. I learned my lesson couple weeks ago ridin the boo. I am 47 now and crashes, they hurt much more now for some reason. Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20140419_122744.jpg 
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ID:	895492 this is going to be ***** to heal that little white dot in the middle it is my elbow bone.

    Cheers
    Yikes!

    I hope you heal up soon. That looks gnarly!

    I don't ride anything techy without pads and that means I wear pads 99% of the time at home. I don't notice them when I ride and I think having a bit of extra protection lets me ride sketchy lines with more confidence. For about half the year pads also keep my joints warm so I can keep riding in shorts all winter.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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    I used to only wear pads for Northshore, Whistler, etc. I just bought a new set up RF Ambush knee pads and love them. At 45, was getting tired of the scrapes and scabs on some falls and mainly washouts on fast corners, so I finally came to the bright idea that maybe I should start wearing pads for MOST of my rides. Last week I only used the knee pads and went OTB twice on some steep techy stuff that I have cleared dozens of times with no problems. Elbows are all scraped up, knees are great. Now I will do both for most rides. Only took several years of riding to come to this conclusion. Ugh.

  59. #159
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    I have only been using knee pads for a few years, but I'm considering some elbows after a few recent scrapes. I like a substantial knee pad, but I'm thinking a minimal elbow pad would suffice. What do you guys like for elbow pads?

  60. #160
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    Re: Vik's Mach 6 Builds

    Poc 2.0 and G-form here. I just broke my wrist though. Any wrist protection or stabilizer which works?

  61. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by turfnsurf View Post
    I have only been using knee pads for a few years, but I'm considering some elbows after a few recent scrapes. I like a substantial knee pad, but I'm thinking a minimal elbow pad would suffice. What do you guys like for elbow pads?
    I'm wearing 616 elbow pads these days. They are small/low profile.



    Race Face has some pads that seem minimal while still having enough protection to bother. I'm going to try some on next time I cross paths with a pair.

    Race Face

    Pads are a wear item so I'm always on the hunt for the next pair. Getting a good fit is hard for me so I don't want to be looking when the old pair is completely toast.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  62. #162
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    vikb thnx

    I have a few pads just choose not to use it. sometimes U can forget that the easiest trails R the ones that end up causing U the most amount of pain. I have a pair of 661 gel elbow/ knees pads like you and I agree that it does not gets in your way.

    So, for now one elbows/knees pads it will b part of my everyday ride. Lesson lived lesson learned.

    Congrats on a well built bike and well put it together journal of your built, I really enjoy this thread.

    Looks like U do have some great trails around U to explore all the Mach6 potential, awesome looking trail.

    Have a safe memorial day.

    Regards
    "My GREATEST FEAR is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my watches for what I told her I paid for them."

  63. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzanova View Post
    Poc 2.0 and G-form here. I just broke my wrist though. Any wrist protection or stabilizer which works?
    I'm suposed to get my cast off my left wrist in 2 weeks. I broke my scaphoid snowboarding 9 weeks ago. I have a new Mach 6 sitting in my basement with only 2 rides on it. Its killing me seeing it sit there with no love. I bought a 661 wrist brace for $10 from major online bike shop (can't remember which one). I'm hoping recovery won't be too much longer. For now I'm riding my single speed Frankenstein hard tail to keep my legs.

  64. #164
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    A rock put a hole in my rear Hans Damf tire. At the time I damaged the Stan's valve stem so I threw in a tube to keep riding on that trip.

    When I got home I installed a tubeless tire plug and a new valve stem. The plug held for 1.5 hard rides before coming loose. I replugged the tire with 2 plugs [shown above] and completed the ride with no issues.



    I wanted a more permanent fix as the tire is new so I don't want to chuck it or run a tube if I don't have to.

    So I applied a patch to the inside of the tire after cleaning off the Stan's and mold release agent. Hopefully this holds long-term.



    I give these tire plugs 2 thumbs up for a fast and easy way to keep you rolling when you damage your tubeless tire. No need to break the bead of the tire. Just plug and pump back up to pressure.

    They definitely have a place in my hydro pack as does a spare valve stem.

    The plugs are re-useable so I saved the ones I had in this tire for the next repair.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  65. #165
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    I need to get some of those in my pack. Thanks for the review.

    Your bike is amazing BTW! Inspirational.

  66. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    A rock put a hole in my rear Hans Damf tire. At the time I damaged the Stan's valve stem so I threw in a tube to keep riding on that trip.
    ...
    I wanted a more permanent fix as the tire is new so I don't want to chuck it or run a tube if I don't have to.

    So I applied a patch to the inside of the tire after cleaning off the Stan's and mold release agent. Hopefully this holds long-term.
    Vik,

    Keep us posted on the long term results on the patch. I took the Hans Dampf off my M6 after a puncture on a smooth trail a few weeks ago that Stans wouldn't seal. I'm racing my first Enduro next weekend and I don't trust the casing on the Hans Dampf anymore, especialy for a rocky race run. If your patch technique works I'll give that a try to get some life out of my almost new HD, but not during a race!

  67. #167
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    Vik's Mach 6 Builds

    Our trails are all rocks. FYI the orange seal does a much better job than Stan's in my opinion.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  68. #168
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    What race Turf?

  69. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    What race Turf?
    California Enduro Series, Pevine - Reno, NV.

  70. #170
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    Looks awesome and saw it sold out. Let us know how it goes!

  71. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by turfnsurf View Post
    Vik,

    Keep us posted on the long term results on the patch.


    I've been punishing the repaired tire on lots of rocky terrain. So far so good. No issues at all.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  72. #172
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    Hornby Island. More good times on my Mach 6. Faster trails than at home. Nice to be able to really open the bike up. The faster you go the happier the Mach 6 is.

    The internal patch on the rear Hans Damf is holding up well.



    Whoa! No hikers only bikes? I love it...
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  73. #173
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    I repair my tires all the time by cutting pieces out of old inner tubes, roughing the piece up with sandpaper, and applying to the inside of the tire using barge cement (on both the patch and inside of tire). The barge cement is a high strength rubber cement that can be bought in most home improvement stores. Say goodbye to throwing tires away when you get holes and sidewall tears.

  74. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    Looks awesome and saw it sold out. Let us know how it goes!
    The 1'st CA Enduro series event at Reno (Peavine Mtn.) was a lot of fun but the Mach 6 was too much bike, thus not really my riding style preference. A 4-5" Trail bike could have dominated the course. I pedaled my butt off and came in 7'th out of 19.

    Last weekend was race 2 at China Peak. A 3-stage course that with lots of super loose, sharp & rocky switchbacks and a nice technical rock garden section. I ran stage 1 & 2 in trail mode on the shock and Pedal mode on my 160mm Pike. Opened them both up for the rock garden on stage 3 and wound up getting a 2'nd place finish, super stoked.

    A bit bummed about the broken Carbon wheel on the pre-ride, but glad it didn't happen on race day. I was running 26-30 PSI and still feel it wasn't enough for the rocky sections. Waiting to here how NOX will handle the wheel...Warrantee or discounted crash replacement (I didn't crash!) Fortunately I brought a backup Aluminum wheelset.

    Funny that out of roughly 250+ participants, mine has been the only M6 at race 1 & 2. I've seen a handful of new Nomads, which will probably kill the next event at Northstar and the following event at Mammoth, I've been hoping to share some Pivot stoke, but no luck yet!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Vik's Mach 6 Builds-img_1510.jpg  

    Vik's Mach 6 Builds-img_1512.jpg  

    Vik's Mach 6 Builds-img_1514.jpg  


  75. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    The internal patch on the rear Hans Damf is holding up well.
    Nice to know, I'll have to give my Hans Dampf a patch and another try! I loved the tread, just not the flat!

  76. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by turfnsurf View Post
    The 1'st CA Enduro series event at Reno (Peavine Mtn.) was a lot of fun but the Mach 6 was too much bike, thus not really my riding style preference. A 4-5" Trail bike could have dominated the course. I pedaled my butt off and came in 7'th out of 19.

    Last weekend was race 2 at China Peak. A 3-stage course that with lots of super loose, sharp & rocky switchbacks and a nice technical rock garden section. I ran stage 1 & 2 in trail mode on the shock and Pedal mode on my 160mm Pike. Opened them both up for the rock garden on stage 3 and wound up getting a 2'nd place finish, super stoked.

    A bit bummed about the broken Carbon wheel on the pre-ride, but glad it didn't happen on race day. I was running 26-30 PSI and still feel it wasn't enough for the rocky sections. Waiting to here how NOX will handle the wheel...Warrantee or discounted crash replacement (I didn't crash!) Fortunately I brought a backup Aluminum wheelset.

    Funny that out of roughly 250+ participants, mine has been the only M6 at race 1 & 2. I've seen a handful of new Nomads, which will probably kill the next event at Northstar and the following event at Mammoth, I've been hoping to share some Pivot stoke, but no luck yet!
    How did it happen? ( I mean, the broken wheel )

  77. #177
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    Rolled off a 5' tall granite slab right onto a hardpack/rocky section that was all part of the course. Must have hit a rock pretty hard to do that damage. Good news from NOX that they are going to provide a new rim under warrantee. Super happy about that. NOX also told me that they redesigned the rim to increase sidewall strength.

  78. #178
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    Great!!!

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    Nice thread.. we had a few peeps send us links to this thread so thought we'd chime in.

    This rim failure is a great example of why we changed our construction technique about 6 months ago. We now use an overwrapped hookless bead. Getting rid of all seams near the bead eliminates the delamination which was most likely the precursor to this failure. All stuff shipping now (and for last 4-5 months) is made using new techniques and we haven't had issues. We appreciate you guys riding hard and helping us improve our rims!
    Nox Composites
    Carbon Fiber Mountain Rims and Wheels

  80. #180
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    I appreciate you guys backing your products so solidly. With all the new choices for Carbon wheels as of late, I'm glad I chose you guys...NOX Rocks!

  81. #181
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    I noticed that the rear Hans Damf tire was picking up rocks and dragging them across the seatstay on each side [bike is upside down in the pic] so I applied a couple Lizard Skin patches to prevent further damage.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  82. #182
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    That damaged Hans Damf died today. Casing let go so the tire bulged massively in the area of the puncture. Still held air fine, but the tire rubbed the CS every revolution.

    Thought my day was done until another rider pulled a spare 650B tire out of his van. You know 650B is here when there are spare tires floating around on a day ride.

    I'm chalking this up to bad luck and I loved the HD other than this so I'm going to try another.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  83. #183
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    What did your final suspension settings look like Vic? Did you end up using a bottomless token in the Pike? I remember seeing you changed out the volume spacer in the Float X. I was just trying to find a baseline so I have somewhere to start from. Thanks.

  84. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by llll Hate llll View Post
    What did your final suspension settings look like Vic? Did you end up using a bottomless token in the Pike? I remember seeing you changed out the volume spacer in the Float X. I was just trying to find a baseline so I have somewhere to start from. Thanks.
    I don't have all my suspension settings at hand, but I used 2 tokens in the Pike and a large volume reduction spacer in the Float X. I ride the Pike in the open setting with the least amount of LSC. The Float X I typically ride in Trail 1 or Descend. Fairly quick rebound on both fork & shock.

    I shoot for ~25% sag at each end.

    With the volume spacer added to the Float X I have a supple initial stroke and have never bottomed out the shock since I made the change. No matter how hard I ride.

    The bike feels taut more than plush, but I prefer it that way.

    I'm pretty happy with things. I haven't messed with them for a while.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  85. #185
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    The GF and I got our M6's out to the Chilcotins for a 5 day float plane assisted camping trip. Lots of fun was had. The M6's did great on the longer smoother trails and were ready to rock when things got steep and rough.



    Trip photos are here.











    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  86. #186
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    Vik's Mach 6 Builds

    Always wanted to get on a float plane. U guys are spoiled with the terrain around I need to relocate.

  87. #187
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    Looks like an awesome trip Vik!

  88. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    Looks like an awesome trip Vik!
    Thanks SP. I'm not an awesome rider so I need to take my M6 to awesome places to keep my awesome quotient high!
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  89. #189
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5power View Post
    Always wanted to get on a float plane. U guys are spoiled with the terrain around I need to relocate.
    I've considered moving to access better job opportunities, but every time I do I realize how good I have it with the biking opportunities close to home.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  90. #190
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    hey vikb - I can't thank you enough for all the detailed pictures you post on your build. it's been an immense help as reference for my build. THANK YOU

    with that, i'd love your and any other members opinion on the best routing method to run the brakes moto style...? Nothing really on the right side to route the LH=Rear brake and back over to the non drive side. Didn't find any postings on mtbr about it either. Would be great to hear your take. Thanks!

  91. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by umicheng View Post
    hey vikb - I can't thank you enough for all the detailed pictures you post on your build. it's been an immense help as reference for my build. THANK YOU

    with that, i'd love your and any other members opinion on the best routing method to run the brakes moto style...? Nothing really on the right side to route the LH=Rear brake and back over to the non drive side. Didn't find any postings on mtbr about it either. Would be great to hear your take. Thanks!
    No problemo. I get lots of useful info from other MTBRer's posts/builds which is why I take the time to share mine. Glad it helped.



    If I wanted to run my brakes moto I'd just cross the housing at the bottom and run each one up the side of the frame's DT I wanted it on. Like in the photo above, but crossed at bottom near BB. You could skip the lowest stick on guide and just zip tie the two housings together where they cross.

    The rear brake would then run up the right side of the DT and the rear derailleur would run up the left side of the DT.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  92. #192
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    I cross the housing on all my mtn bikes. I'm from England but have lived in the US almost 20 years and don't understand why brakes aren't set up moto on bicycles here. My road bikes are moto too. The first time a friend borrowed my old 5 Spot he went otb in the first mile.

  93. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by wilks View Post
    I cross the housing on all my mtn bikes. I'm from England but have lived in the US almost 20 years and don't understand why brakes aren't set up moto on bicycles here. My road bikes are moto too. The first time a friend borrowed my old 5 Spot he went otb in the first mile.
    I was on an advanced MTB course this summer and 1 instructor was English and their brakes were moto style. Caused all sorts of confusion with the participants.

    I ride a motorcycle daily, but I never confuse the MTB and the moto
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  94. #194
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    Yeah. It's what your used to but having ridden bmx, road etc as a kid in England I wasn't about to relearn how to apply brakes. I am renting bikes in Moab and fruita next month and put in the swap request for the brakes.

  95. #195
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    yep! I just can't grasp the fact the front brake is on my LEFT side. I can make myself utilize the rear brake on the right, but I just get all confused when I need to use both. Enough where I'm just going to switch and make my life easier.

    I'm frequently on the race track with my sportbike, and have the same issues if I change bikes to riding GP (reverse) vs standard shifting. I think some people just rely more on muscle memory than others.

    This XS frame is a b*tch. Stared at it for a while last night and putting cables, I'm not sure if I'd be able to get my shock out. Theres like 2mm of space in between the shock and frame. I decided to route the RD cable through the frame straight over the shock...and I think im going to use a stick on, on the body of the shock to hold at that point to prevent rubbing. If I route my brake housing through there too, Im not sure how we'll they'll both hold together with the frame movement....but I'll keep you posted. ugh wish there were better solutions!

  96. #196
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    I got injured last fall and had to take a several months off the bike to let my arm get better. So not much Pivot action going on in my life. I did write a short review for our local MTB advocacy group's magazine.

    I had to keep it brief to fit the review into the space available.



    I'm back on the bike now, but it's winter in the PNWet so I'm trashing my 6yr old SC Nomad. Although I miss the Mach 6 when I come home with a bike that's coated in mud I don't regret riding the old bike. Not only am I not wearing out the expensive ride, but I'm pushing around an extra 8lbs which is helping me get back to my normal level of bike fitness.

    I hope all the Pivoteer's out there had a good holiday season and best wishes for an awesome 2015!
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

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    Vik, I was wondering what happened to you just last week as we haven't heard anything from you in quite a while. Sorry to hear about your injury, good to hear you are on the mend. Been getting in some great night rides in the Seattle area of late with this non winter weather. In between the rain storms, there have been some great rides in hero dirt.

    Thanks again for the finish piece you made for everyone. I just got complimented on mine again last week. Safe riding in 2015.

  98. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by dawgman25 View Post
    Vik, I was wondering what happened to you just last week as we haven't heard anything from you in quite a while. Sorry to hear about your injury, good to hear you are on the mend. Been getting in some great night rides in the Seattle area of late with this non winter weather. In between the rain storms, there have been some great rides in hero dirt.

    Thanks again for the finish piece you made for everyone. I just got complimented on mine again last week. Safe riding in 2015.
    Ya it was a sad end to an awesome riding year, but I got lots of fly fishing in with my good arm!

    I love the year round riding in the PNW. I figure with some lights I can get my riding legs back under me in time for the prime time riding season starting in spring.

    I'm glad the cover is working out for you.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  99. #199
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    Wow my last post in this thread was back in January.

    I had another great spring/summer season on the M6. Really not that much to talk about the bike just works. No hassles. No drama. I like that.

    I was a little sad to get rid of the Schwalbe Hans Damfs, but after wearing them out so fast I needed to try something else. The Continental Trail Kings in 2.4" width are working out pretty well.

    At the start of October I'm going to switch back to my Santa Cruz Nomad winter rig and abuse that all through the PNWet winter. I love rocking a 7yr old bike that is still amazing! And I like keeping the M6 minty fresh for the prime time riding season.



    So I am thinking of sending my Float X to Avalanche Racing to do their magic. Anyone running an Avy'd Float X on your M6? On my Nomad it made the bike 100% better. The M6 works pretty well stock so I'm trying to gauge what to expect from the upgrade. I also have to measure the clearance below the shock to see if it will fit.

    For about the same $$ I can get a CCBD Inline and then keep the Float X as a spare. Reading Dawgman's bad CCBD experiences I'm not so sure that's a great move.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  100. #200
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    Vik - Avy transformed my fox shocks on my Mach 5.7c and Mojo HD and I'll be sending the Float X in off my Mach 6 as soon as it snows. I'm aware of lots of inline issues. I'd look for a DBair if you're looking at Cane Creek.

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