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  1. #1
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    Thoughts from anyone that went from a VPP bike to a DW-Link bike

    I was looking for feedback from anyone that has gone from a VPP bike (e.g., Intense, Santa Cruz) to a DW-link bike like the Pivot. I currently have an Intense Tracer VP and have been considering a move to a Pivot (most likely a 429). I was curious what differences you noted between the two platforms - climbing, descending, etc.

    For reference purposes, I ride primarily in western PA on a variety of trails, but mostly XC.

    Thanks in advance for any feedback you can provide!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by yzblue242
    I was looking for feedback from anyone that has gone from a VPP bike (e.g., Intense, Santa Cruz) to a DW-link bike like the Pivot. I currently have an Intense Tracer VP and have been considering a move to a Pivot (most likely a 429). I was curious what differences you noted between the two platforms - climbing, descending, etc.

    For reference purposes, I ride primarily in western PA on a variety of trails, but mostly XC.

    Thanks in advance for any feedback you can provide!
    I had the original Nomad and the Nomad Gen 2 and now have the Firebird. The biggest thing that I noticed once I started riding the Firebird was how much I didn't notice the rear suspension. I feel no pedal kick back/feed back, unless pro pedal is on or in the smallest gears 22/34 and 22/32. Even than it is so mild and way less noticeable than the Nomad and other VPP bikes that I have ridden. Most bikes suspension is designed around the middle chain ring and unless you use those 2 smallest gears, it's really not an issue. Just for the record, I only used the pro pedal to see how it reacted with the DW. I have not used it since, climbs much better with it off. I also noticed that the Firebird has better small bump compliance. The Firebird climbs through technical terrain better than any other bike I have ever owned or ridden. Sure there is a weight penalty and less than ideal geometry for climbing, but I am just trying to make the point about how well this bike with DW climbs. That is my 2 cents.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdobberina
    I had the original Nomad and the Nomad Gen 2 and now have the Firebird. The biggest thing that I noticed once I started riding the Firebird was how much I didn't notice the rear suspension. I feel no pedal kick back/feed back, unless pro pedal is on or in the smallest gears 22/34 and 22/32. Even than it is so mild and way less noticeable than the Nomad and other VPP bikes that I have ridden. Most bikes suspension is designed around the middle chain ring and unless you use those 2 smallest gears, it's really not an issue. Just for the record, I only used the pro pedal to see how it reacted with the DW. I have not used it since, climbs much better with it off. I also noticed that the Firebird has better small bump compliance. The Firebird climbs through technical terrain better than any other bike I have ever owned or ridden. Sure there is a weight penalty and less than ideal geometry for climbing, but I am just trying to make the point about how well this bike with DW climbs. That is my 2 cents.
    Essentially the same for me. I also went from a Gen1 Nomad to a Firebird and tried out the Gen 2 Nomad. I only nice some pedal feedback in 22 and the fourth easiest gear on the cassette, none of the other gear combintions.

    I also went from the 3.5" travel Giant Anthem to the Mach 5 and the Mach 5 feels more efficient, has more travel, is more comfortable, no pedal feedback in any gear combination that I can feel, doesn't hang up on square edge stuff and doesn't have the dead feel of the Anthem. So I prefer DWL over Maesto as well.

  4. #4
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    Poah! Hard to explain. dw is the best i ever rode. but i also have to say that dw just was very early. like there is a huge difference between first Blur Lt and current LTC. HUGE ! Both are great these days. buy what looks nicer to you and close reliable shop is wort gold. yes you can correct my faults, its not my mother tongue.
    check fork on the table utb

  5. #5
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    häh

  6. #6
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    I rode an Intense 5.5 EVP for a year and now have a year with a Pivot Mach 5. One noticeable difference is that the pedal bob is significantly less with the Mach 5. I ride without any ProPedal features with the Mach 5 and it pedaled as well as the 5.5 EVP with ProPedal on at "3" setting (both were Fox RP23). The small bump compliance is also better with the Mach 5, namely because I have never use the ProPedal, while having it on all the time one the 5.5 EVP. The Intense 5.5 EVP however, without ProPedal, had better active suspension while braking.

  7. #7
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    It's like an ice cream cone in the desert that doesn't melt while you are eating it.
    "It looks flexy"

  8. #8
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    As its already been said, it is really tough to put your finger on it, but its just the best pedaling bike I have every had, PERIOD.

    I have riden a gen1 Nomad, recently an LTc and a Tracer. There is just something that is not quite complete in the suspension set up. There is no feel like a DW link, climbing or descending. Its 2 seperate animals, where as the VPP stuff seems to be the same animal in 2 different applications. Just my expericne and opinions. I rode a Tracer prior to my firebird and was offered a killer deal on one and I still passed, as I knew I was looking for something MORE, just wasn't sure what it was till I got my firebird.
    COMBA fan boy card holder #1.

  9. #9
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    I think the only real tradeoff is that you don't have that absolute climbing traction in steep muddy wet stuff like you do on FSR. But it's worth it And VPP is worse about that.
    "It looks flexy"

  10. #10
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    Thanks for all of the feedback - much appreciated!

  11. #11
    change is good
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    Went from a 429 to a PUSHed Tallboy and now back to the 429. Both ride great. The Tallboy felt too plush in the midrange and a PUSH tune took care of it. The 429 is the only FS bike that I owned felt right out of the box.

  12. #12
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    I had a first gen Blur LT, it was a great bike, sold it for a rigid bike and ended up building up a 429 this past spring. I was never able to ride them side by side so my perception could be skewed and I hate to bash my old blur but the pedaling of the 429 seems to be on a whole other level- this is purely subjective but with or without propedal you always have a solid feel at the crank, if you watch the shock you might see movement but for some reason it does not seem to transmit into a bobbing feel- For my style of riding primarily on XC the DW is preferred, at least over VPP V1-
    I Just wish I could ride more!


  13. #13
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    I agree with everyone else. It is the best pedaling bike out there. I had the first generation Blur and hated it. I then bought a Stumpjumper and felt the same way. I finally settled on a 429 and absolutely love it. Its as close as you can get to a hardtail while climbing in or out of the saddle and flys downhill. Despite its 100 mil of travel, I never felt like its bottomed out.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by gticlay
    I think the only real tradeoff is that you don't have that absolute climbing traction in steep muddy wet stuff like you do on FSR. But it's worth it And VPP is worse about that.
    hey guys, I'm will be moving from an fsr motolite to a mach 5, can anyone else vouch for the above comment.

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