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  1. #1
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    Tell me bad things about the Mach 6

    I'm dangerously close to purchasing a Mach 6. Beyond the ride quality, I want some feedback on "living with the bike." Things like annoying or quirky cable routing or cable rub, creaky suspension, bolts working free over time, fragile paint etc. if you could change aspects of the design what would they be?

    Also, how is Pivot's customer/warranty service? My other 2 bikes are from Ibis, so I may have been spoiled in this regard...

  2. #2
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    They only bad thing I can think of is that I don't have mine yet..

  3. #3
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    Cable routing is not the greatest and it rubs on the rear shock a little even with the standoff's. No other issues that I have seen over the few weeks I have had it.

  4. #4
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    The M6 is pretty new. I think you can't really get a good answer to your question until the end of the summer. A lot of people are still waiting on their bikes to show up and a bunch of M6 owners won't get in many miles until the snow melts.

    The M6 has rec'd great initial reviews, but nobody can really comment on the long term performance of the bike. It's just too new.
    Safe riding,

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  5. #5
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    Well I'm stretching a bit here

    - cables bulge out a bit towards the right leg close to the rear shock when the bike is compressed

    - stock Kenda tires are shit

    That's all i can really think of. Pivot's CS is good to answer the other question
    Locals' Guide to North Shore Rides http://mtbtrails.ca/

  6. #6
    Ambi-Turner
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    I've had mine three weeks. Cable is rubbing paint off of shock mount. Rear tire (Nevegal 2.35 on P35 rim) is dangerously close to chainstay. I will probably run a 2.25 next. I didn't care for a lot of the stock components, but it was still a better deal to swap them out than building a frame. There is nothing that should stop any serious buyer looking for a serious trail/AM rig.

  7. #7
    Appalachian Singletrack'n
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    Fit - As much as i wanted one, the bike just didn't fit me. The STA was too slack and the reach too short if i sized up the bike felt way too big to me. Interesting to hear about the tire clearance, the bike i rode had some sort of xc tire on the back and it had good clearance but it was a smallish tread.

  8. #8
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    Re: Tell me bad things about the Mach 6

    Quote Originally Posted by Endomaniac View Post
    Fit - As much as i wanted one, the bike just didn't fit me. The STA was too slack and the reach too short if i sized up the bike felt way too big to me. Interesting to hear about the tire clearance, the bike i rode had some sort of xc tire on the back and it had good clearance but it was a smallish tread.
    How tall are you and what is you inseam? Short or long torso?
    Which sizes did you try?
    Which bike do you ride now?
    Thanks!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Endomaniac View Post
    Fit - As much as i wanted one, the bike just didn't fit me. The STA was too slack and the reach too short if i sized up the bike felt way too big to me. Interesting to hear about the tire clearance, the bike i rode had some sort of xc tire on the back and it had good clearance but it was a smallish tread.
    I'm curious about this too. I'm 6'2.5" and was very happy on an XL Bronson (recently stolen, $%&#! bike thieves.) So looking at the Mach 6, an XL looks fairly comparable except I notice it has a much shorter reach (~1" shorter) despite having similar TT length. I assume this is because of the slack seat tube. Combined with the short rear end this makes me think I'll be much more over the rear wheel than I was on the Bronson. This would probably make the bike super fun and maneuverable but might also make it prone to front-end wander on climbs. Any feedback from folks who have the bike?

  10. #10
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    - Cable routing with the standoffs rubs on the shock and knocks the o-ring off
    - Rubber chainguard on the seat stay is coming off (got the bike in October)
    - Rear shock bolt comes loose. Make sure it is torqued properly
    - Running a 2.35 Nobby Nic as a rear tire - no clearance issues

  11. #11
    Appalachian Singletrack'n
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    I rode a large Im 6'1" average proportions i like a reach in the 17-17.5" range I refuse to ride stems over 50mm on a trail bike. I sat on an XL, I would need a dropper stem and a flat bar along with a stepladder for that frame. I came off a large Firebird for the last 4 years which my main complaint on that bike was the slack STA/short reach and its a pig.

  12. #12
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    I posted a question like this a few months ago. Got next to nothing on problems.

    Ordered the bike and its just about ready to ship.

    Hope nothing nasty pops up.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Endomaniac View Post
    I rode a large Im 6'1" average proportions i like a reach in the 17-17.5" range I refuse to ride stems over 50mm on a trail bike. I sat on an XL, I would need a dropper stem and a flat bar along with a stepladder for that frame. I came off a large Firebird for the last 4 years which my main complaint on that bike was the slack STA/short reach and its a pig.
    This is what I'm worried about. At 6'2", average proportions I haven't been able to get on an XL 6, going to have to order it without a test fit. Coming off an XL Mojo HD which, like your Firebird, is too short. I like the fit of an XL Bronson which has a longer reach, and the stack and head tube isn't over an inch longer like on the Mach 6.

    Edit: Just saw Drewbirds post too, check out the head tube measurements, its over an inch longer on an XL Mach 6 compared to an XL Bronson.

  14. #14
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    ~4wks on my Mach6. Killer do-it-all bike.

    The only thing/nit I can think of is some cable rub near the top of the rear shock body. Cable rub is one of those things that is easily solved with some protective tape if desired.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by robnow View Post
    This is what I'm worried about. At 6'2", average proportions I haven't been able to get on an XL 6, going to have to order it without a test fit. Coming off an XL Mojo HD which, like your Firebird, is too short. I like the fit of an XL Bronson which has a longer reach, and the stack and head tube isn't over an inch longer like on the Mach 6.

    Edit: Just saw Drewbirds post too, check out the head tube measurements, its over an inch longer on an XL Mach 6 compared to an XL Bronson.
    Yep, sounds like we're in about the same boat. I'm not that worried about the longer HT, as I was running my Bronson with a 160mm fork and had ~1" spacers, up-angled stem and lo-rise bars. So I think a slammed stem on the Pivot w/150mm fork should work OK; probably still go with lo-rise bars.

    For the reach, note that the effective TT length is about the same, but the seat post is more slack on the Pivot. So the Pivot moves the rider back relative to the wheels, putting you more over the rear wheel. This is what I'm wondering about; with that diff. plus ultra-short stays, will it be a challenge to keep the front down on steep climbs?

  16. #16
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    I'm happy with mine, the paint decals on the top tube are a bit delicate and the shock rub is an issue. Here's a few things I did.



    Make your cable as short as possible should look nice and straight like this



    It will still rub against the top of the shock but shouldn't touch the frame, if you bend and rotate the outer you can direct the movement, haven't touched mine since.



    The shock mount pictured may need to be greased and hopefully it won't develop play but this is just a theory



    ardent race 2.25 pictured, previously ran high roller 2.35 which would touch the frame occasionally, the marks you can see are just mud, theres no real damage apart from some small rub marks.



    Clearance underneath



    XL frame, rear brake cable stop you can see under the top tube is completely useless, the cable kept falling out. I wrapped both cables in a self bonding rubber tape, protects the frame nicely and stops that long cable from touching.
    Pivot mach 6!

  17. #17
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    Thanks for the pics...can you take the decals off the M6?
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  18. #18
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    Here's an alternative (better) cable routing for the Machs. Maybe not as photogenic as the Pivot routing, but much more functional when the suspension is working. No cable rub whatsoever.

    When I purchased the bike, my lbs mechanic asked me if I wanted the "Pivot routing" or the "Good routing"...


  19. #19
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    I would prefer external cable routing, but I couldn't bring myself to use zipties on a M6.
    Safe riding,

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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joel RW View Post
    I'm happy with mine, the paint decals on the top tube are a bit delicate and the shock rub is an issue. Here's a few things I did.
    Hey Joel, can you post a couple pics of your complete bike? I haven't found a ton of pics of the XL size, which is a bit different than other sizes with the split TT/HT. Is the useless brake line routing issue unique to XLs? Is there a way to run RD cable in unbroken housing? With the amount of mud I ride in that'd be preferable. Is your Pike 150mm or 160?

  21. #21
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    Bottom bracket is too low.
    Nice KOM, sorry about your penis.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrwhlr View Post
    Bottom bracket is too low.
    That's funny. I've read M6 reviews that report it having a way low BB and others that talk about it having a high BB.

    My current bike has a 14" BB so the M6 is lower than it with no rider. I understand DW link sits higher its travel than other suspension designs so there may not be a practical difference between two bikes with different BB heights.
    Safe riding,

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  23. #23
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    My converted 650b TRc with a 140mm 26" fork has a BB of 13.4", unsagged. I rarely get any pedal strikes, it's just right for my usual trails.
    I get more of them on my SC TB with a 120mm fork.
    On M6 3h demo I got a few, nothing really bad, but still... M6 has a 13.6" BB. I actually like the fact, since I was afraid the M6 BB would be too high. It seems to be perfect for SoCal riding.

  24. #24
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    BB is personal preference. I have my Enduro which is 13.1" to my HD at 13.8" with the M6 in the middle. They all ride well and have different advantages and disadvantages.

  25. #25
    fc
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    This is a good thread since I'm reviewing the bike.

    BB height I think is a bit high for the modern rally bike. 13.0 to 13.3" make awesome handlers an this bike is at 13.6". But it does give it extra rock clearance for folks who live in rough terrain. I ride in Norcal so I'd much rather have 13.1"

    Cable routing... ay caramba. It's clean but it has to deal with all that suspension movement.

    Decals - holy moly there's a lot of them. 27.5, 155 mm travel, 650b do not have to be decals.

    Seat tube angle is slack at 71.5. The modern bike is much better off with a 74 degree seat angle to make the pedaling position ideal. And since 99% of these bikes will have a dropper post, the seat is out of the way anyway during descending.

    fc
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post
    Seat tube angle is slack at 71.5. The modern bike is much better off with a 74 degree seat angle to make the pedaling position ideal. And since 99% of these bikes will have a dropper post, the seat is out of the way anyway during descending.
    Francois, thanks for chiming in. I wonder if you could clarify your preference for a steeper seat tube? Is this just to give an ideal hip-pedal relationship, or related to front/rear balance on the bike?

  27. #27
    fc
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    Francois, thanks for chiming in. I wonder if you could clarify your preference for a steeper seat tube? Is this just to give an ideal hip-pedal relationship, or related to front/rear balance on the bike?
    A steeper seat angle seems to put my hips and my weight in a much better pedaling position. The knee seems to go right over the pedal in the 3 o clock power position.

    The downside is it's not ideal for descending when the seat is all the way up.

    fc
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  28. #28
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    Re: Tell me bad things about the Mach 6

    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post
    A steeper seat angle seems to put my hips and my weight in a much better pedaling position. The knee seems to go right over the pedal in the 3 o clock power position.

    The downside is it's not ideal for descending when the seat is all the way up.

    fc
    But does the STA really matter if the ST is bend and does not come straight from the BB?
    I can imagine that riders with shorter inseam will be more over the BB and those with longer one will be farther back. While on a bike with less relaxed STA the difference will be not as pronounced.
    But theoretically, what really matters is where the seat is when fully extended for climbing or pedaling in seated position.
    If it is too far back it will negatively effect pedaling doesn't matter what the STA is.
    Or am I missing something here?

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post
    This is a good thread since I'm reviewing the bike.

    BB height I think is a bit high for the modern rally bike. 13.0 to 13.3" make awesome handlers an this bike is at 13.6". But it does give it extra rock clearance for folks who live in rough terrain. I ride in Norcal so I'd much rather have 13.1"

    Cable routing... ay caramba. It's clean but it has to deal with all that suspension movement.

    Decals - holy moly there's a lot of them. 27.5, 155 mm travel, 650b do not have to be decals.

    Seat tube angle is slack at 71.5. The modern bike is much better off with a 74 degree seat angle to make the pedaling position ideal. And since 99% of these bikes will have a dropper post, the seat is out of the way anyway during descending.

    fc
    i live in Norcal as well and a 13" BB sounds downright scary and dangerous, plenty of rock trails around here. Would be scared to clip a rock while cornering with outside foot down, put you on your side in a heartbeat. Especially with a 6" bike, at full compression that pedal is going to be AWFULLY low

    Steep Seat tube angles are cool for a long travel Slack bike when going up steep climbs to keep it from wheeling, but thats about it. It positions you too upright and makes the reach too short, which is terrible for long rides or flat'ter terrain.

    Slack Seat tube angle puts the seat farther back meaning you have to get even farther back to get "behind the seat" for steep stuff, meaning you will need a seat dropper even MORE. What it does is allow you to stay centered or neutral IN the bike without the seat being in the way for flowy trails and jumping

  30. #30
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    Re: Tell me bad things about the Mach 6

    Quote Originally Posted by Yody View Post
    Slack Seat tube angle puts the seat farther back meaning you have to get even farther back to get "behind the seat", meaning you will need a seat dropper even MORE. What it does is allow you to stay centered or neutral IN the bike without the seat being in the way.
    This makes sense. Let's say 2 different bikes with the same TT length, different STA, everything else the same.
    Slacker SA bike should also have longer reach...

  31. #31
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    The BB is low because it's an AZ bike, not some pump track shuttle turd.
    Nice KOM, sorry about your penis.

  32. #32
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    I think that's right. It's also the case that no one makes a setback dropper post. I always found myself running my saddle pushed most of the way back on the rails on my Bronson (73 deg. ST), so I'm thinking I'd be able to run it closer to center-of-rails on a M6. (Test ride this weekend, so we'll see...)

  33. #33
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    Steep STAs perch you "on top" of the bike, as opposed to slacker STAs that put you "in" the bike. I've got longer legs and on a steep bike I feel like I'm perched up too high. The higher I go the more forward lean I have, which leads to more pressure on the hands.

    Lower BBs handle much better than higher BBs IMO.

    Low, slack, and in the bike is where I want to be. Leave that tall, perched feeling for the roadies and canaries.

  34. #34
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    Has anyone else actually measured the ST angle? The "effective" angle is whatever. The actual angle is significantly slacker. I would agree with Francois that is should be steeper. The problem for them is that to make it steeper shortens the effective TT as well. Only way to fix this is move the BB back (would also lengthen the reach which would be nice) which then lengthens the wheelbase (maybe no so nice). Tough decisions to make for the designers.

  35. #35
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    I think the "virtual" SA is perfect for me on my Mach 6; it puts my saddle in the middle of the saddle rails with KOPS in perfect position with the seatpost fully extended. Same positon as my Mojo HD. For me, Pivot found that "magic" combination of geometry and suspension characteristics for climbing, descending, and all round riding. I agree with the other posters about a "too steep" SA that puts the rider too far forward; not good for general riding, and not good for KOPS with my long legs.

    -"virtual" SA because the seat tube does not intersect the bottom bracket; this is something a few manufacturers are doing.

    Claimed SA for Mach 6 (L): 71.5
    Claimed SA for Mojo HD (XL): 71.5

  36. #36
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    Good discussion on this. I am still building my new M6, but came from 2010 and 2012 Enduros. Steeper seat angles and longer chainstays. I have long legs, so maybe I will like this set up better. I have always felt a bit on top of my Enduros, so this feedback makes sense.

  37. #37
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    In currently on a 2014 sworks enduro with 650b wheels and fork but am very tempted to buy a mach 6.
    It's a size large enduro.
    Numbers are deceiving, especially with specialized.
    Their seat tube in relation to the bb is very far forward so people think that the tt is short, but the 'reach' it's big and i think this is why the Command post is a layback/setback design.
    I can imagine the m6 being a similar feel to my old mojo hd's, which i liked. ....until it kept cracking!
    The one thing that did bother me slightly with the dw was that the anti sqaut design did sit up alot on very steep stuff which forced the saddle to hit me in the crown jewels a lot.
    Reviews are saying the m6 dw is even more progressive, does this mean that the anti squat is more pronounced than a hd?
    Im very close to buying this frame and pouring all the kit from the sworks on to this.
    Will my shimano 73mm cranks fit with a conversion bb or is the width different?
    Also i have a 30.9 stealth reverb atm, will this fit or is the post a 31.6?

    Thanks,your advice is appreciated.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by waldo1 View Post
    In currently on a 2014 sworks enduro with 650b wheels and fork but am very tempted to buy a mach 6.
    It's a size large enduro.
    Numbers are deceiving, especially with specialized.
    Their seat tube in relation to the bb is very far forward so people think that the tt is short, but the 'reach' it's big and i think this is why the Command post is a layback/setback design.
    I can imagine the m6 being a similar feel to my old mojo hd's, which i liked. ....until it kept cracking!
    The one thing that did bother me slightly with the dw was that the anti sqaut design did sit up alot on very steep stuff which forced the saddle to hit me in the crown jewels a lot.
    Reviews are saying the m6 dw is even more progressive, does this mean that the anti squat is more pronounced than a hd?
    Im very close to buying this frame and pouring all the kit from the sworks on to this.
    Will my shimano 73mm cranks fit with a conversion bb or is the width different?
    Also i have a 30.9 stealth reverb atm, will this fit or is the post a 31.6?

    Thanks,your advice is appreciated.
    73mm cranks will fit. Seattube is 30.9.
    Go for it!

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by waldo1 View Post
    In currently on a 2014 sworks enduro with 650b wheels and fork but am very tempted to buy a mach 6.
    It's a size large enduro.
    Numbers are deceiving, especially with specialized.
    Their seat tube in relation to the bb is very far forward so people think that the tt is short, but the 'reach' it's big and i think this is why the Command post is a layback/setback design.
    I can imagine the m6 being a similar feel to my old mojo hd's, which i liked. ....until it kept cracking!
    The one thing that did bother me slightly with the dw was that the anti sqaut design did sit up alot on very steep stuff which forced the saddle to hit me in the crown jewels a lot.
    Reviews are saying the m6 dw is even more progressive, does this mean that the anti squat is more pronounced than a hd?
    Im very close to buying this frame and pouring all the kit from the sworks on to this.
    Will my shimano 73mm cranks fit with a conversion bb or is the width different?
    Also i have a 30.9 stealth reverb atm, will this fit or is the post a 31.6?

    Thanks,your advice is appreciated.
    What they mean by progressive is that the initial stroke is very supple and then the spring curve ramps up as you move through the travel to keep it from bottoming. Anti squat is different, but it feels good while pedaling!

  40. #40
    fc
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    Has anyone else actually measured the ST angle? The "effective" angle is whatever. The actual angle is significantly slacker. I would agree with Francois that is should be steeper. The problem for them is that to make it steeper shortens the effective TT as well. Only way to fix this is move the BB back (would also lengthen the reach which would be nice) which then lengthens the wheelbase (maybe no so nice). Tough decisions to make for the designers.
    The actual seat tube angle looks to be about 68 degrees. The actual SA is slack because the the seat tube starts forward of the bb to make room for the suspension pivots.

    So I assume they draw a line from the bb center to the center of the seatpost at a prescribed height. That is the virtual seat tube angle and it is only accurate at that set height. Probably 6 inches of post showing.

    fc
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  41. #41
    fc
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    As far as Seat Tube Angles is concerned, I think 71 degrees is the safe, old-school bet. It'll work for sure.

    But there are new geometries now that are dropper post optimized. Bronson is at 73, Enduro is at 74+, Kona Process is at 74 and the sweet new Orbea Rallon is at 74+. And having ridden all these, I would say steeper is better for climbing and tooling around. And when the going gets going, drop the post.

    So it is not a deal breaker but the 73 degree neighborhood is better than the 71 Seat Angle hood.

    fc
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  42. #42
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    Re: Tell me bad things about the Mach 6

    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post
    As far as Seat Tube Angles is concerned, I think 71 degrees is the safe, old-school bet. It'll work for sure.

    But there are new geometries now that are dropper post optimized. Bronson is at 73, Enduro is at 74+, Kona Process is at 74 and the sweet new Orbea Rallon is at 74+. And having ridden all these, I would say steeper is better for climbing and tooling around. And when the going gets going, drop the post.

    So it is not a deal breaker but the 73 degree neighborhood is better than the 71 Seat Angle hood.

    fc
    I still don't get it.
    Let's assume the sitting position for a certain rider is ideal on both bikes, one with steep SA and another one with more relaxed SA.
    I always assumed that if the wheels, saddle, bars and BB were in the same places and the 2 bikes were identical in everything else, except for the SA, then they would handle exactly the same.
    The only difference is when the saddle is raised/lowered. On a bike with a slacker SA the seat will be moved farther back when raised.
    So theoretically, in this particular case it doesn't matter what the SA is. And it also shows that one cannot say a bike with a steeper STA will climb better, unless we take into the consideration the whole geometry.

    Can somebody correct me if I am wrong?


    Sent from my KFTT using Tapatalk 2

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Steep STAs perch you "on top" of the bike, as opposed to slacker STAs that put you "in" the bike. I've got longer legs and on a steep bike I feel like I'm perched up too high. The higher I go the more forward lean I have, which leads to more pressure on the hands.

    Lower BBs handle much better than higher BBs IMO.

    Low, slack, and in the bike is where I want to be. Leave that tall, perched feeling for the roadies and canaries.
    ^this
    its 2014 time to leave that old school geo in the past! Especially considering this is an Enduro bike. If it performs and feels good who cares
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    My 5yr old Nomad has the same 71.5 STA and the Pivot M6 does in the geo chart. It climbs tech just fine.

    Thing is the M6's ST doesn't connect with the BB so the STA has to be a virtual measurement which will depend how high you place your saddle. The higher the saddle the slacker the STA and the lower the saddle the steeper the STA.

    Question is - how did Pivot measure the 71.5 deg value in the M6 geo chart?

    -- is that the virtual STA at a specific saddle height?
    -- is it the actual STA of the seat tube which due to the fact it's not lined up the BB means we need to figure out the virtual STA [which will be steeper] to really compare bikes?
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  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mt.Biker E View Post
    ^this
    its 2014 time to leave that old school geo in the past! Especially considering this is an Enduro bike. If it performs and feels good who cares

    Who cares what the numbers are? I bought this bike and it rides great!! True statement.

    But hey, you guys asked.

    fc
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  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post

    My 5yr old Nomad has the same 71.5 STA and the Pivot M6 does in the geo chart. It climbs tech just fine.

    Thing is the M6's ST doesn't connect with the BB so the STA has to be a virtual measurement which will depend how high you place your saddle. The higher the saddle the slacker the STA and the lower the saddle the steeper the STA.

    Question is - how did Pivot measure the 71.5 deg value in the M6 geo chart?

    -- is that the virtual STA at a specific saddle height?
    -- is it the actual STA of the seat tube which due to the fact it's not lined up the BB means we need to figure out the virtual STA [which will be steeper] to really compare bikes?

    Yes, it is at a set saddle height. What it is, we don't know.

    Their 71.5 measurement is virtual at that set height. Any higher saddle height will be slacker.

    Nomad at 71.5 is cool. But for sure a new Nomad or SC bike will have a steeper Seat Angle.

    fc
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  47. #47
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    Knollys have a seat tube angle of about 68 degrees but the seat tube is in front of the BB making the effective seat tube angle 74 degrees.

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    Re: Tell me bad things about the Mach 6

    I will say it again.

    If the wheels, saddle, bars and BB were in the same places and the 2 bikes were otherwise identical, except for the SA, then they would handle exactly the same.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post
    The actual seat tube angle looks to be about 68 degrees. The actual SA is slack because the the seat tube starts forward of the bb to make room for the suspension pivots.

    So I assume they draw a line from the bb center to the center of the seatpost at a prescribed height. That is the virtual seat tube angle and it is only accurate at that set height. Probably 6 inches of post showing.

    fc
    Mine measured out at 66 to be exact. Personally I would say not to get too wrapped up in the STA. Yes, I like the steeper angle of my Enduro 29 better, but it is far from a deal breaker. Just push the seat forward on the rails and have at it. The bike climbs like a mountain goat. I was getting farther up steep loose climbs than my buddies on their HT's earlier this week and I wasn't even wearing spandex!

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post
    This is a good thread since I'm reviewing the bike.

    BB height I think is a bit high for the modern rally bike. 13.0 to 13.3" make awesome handlers an this bike is at 13.6". But it does give it extra rock clearance for folks who live in rough terrain. I ride in Norcal so I'd much rather have 13.1"

    Cable routing... ay caramba. It's clean but it has to deal with all that suspension movement.

    Decals - holy moly there's a lot of them. 27.5, 155 mm travel, 650b do not have to be decals.

    Seat tube angle is slack at 71.5. The modern bike is much better off with a 74 degree seat angle to make the pedaling position ideal. And since 99% of these bikes will have a dropper post, the seat is out of the way anyway during descending.

    fc

    These are my concerns as well. I've found lower and steeper STA works good for me too and nice for loading the front end (better attack position) in corners and steaming down the hill. My SB66 had similar STA/HTA/BB height w/160 fork and needed dropper fork to make the climbs comfortable (non wander) and found myself descending a lot in 130 fork position (not enough travel) to allow for lower ride height. Trail/AM bikes with BB >13.4" is too high IMO as well, even for rocks and chunk.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzanova View Post
    I will say it again.

    If the wheels, saddle, bars and BB were in the same places and the 2 bikes were otherwise identical, except for the SA, then they would handle exactly the same.
    I think SA can have an effect on balance, reach & how the geometry of the bike is designed. For example, in an XL (my size) the M6 and the Bronson have similar "effective TT" numbers, but the reach on the Pivot is almost a full inch shorter (reach being horizontal distance from BB center to top HT center). This means that the "effective TT" is essentially moved back relative to the wheelbase on the M6. So if you set those two bike up with the same posts and stems, you'd have similar saddle-bar distances, but on the Pivot you'd have more weight over the rear wheel; the slacker SA of the M6 essentially pulls the effective TT back toward the rear of the bike. Of course you could normalize this: shift your saddle forward and put a longer stem on the Pivot. But that would change the ride a bit.

    (A caveat: some of the shorter reach on the M6 is actually due to the 1" taller HT. Since reach is measured to top of HT center, and HT is obviously angled, the taller it is the closer the top is to the BB.)

  52. #52
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    Are the decals under some clearcoat or can you remove them?
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    Decals can't be removed. They are not stickers, they're thin and (I think) painted on so you couldn't peel them off in one piece. Same as the S.C. Bronson, Ibis Mojo and other "matte" finished bikes. After looking at all 3 colors in the flesh today I'll be going with a Stealth Carbon.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    Decals can't be removed. They are not stickers, they're thin and (I think) painted on so you couldn't peel them off in one piece. Same as the S.C. Bronson, Ibis Mojo and other "matte" finished bikes. After looking at all 3 colors in the flesh today I'll be going with a Stealth Carbon.
    Thanks for the confirmation. I don't need to be reminded 5 times what brand bike I am riding. Luckily quality custom vinyl decals are easy to get locally and can camouflage any unwanted branding without looking bad.

    I can see the appeal of the stealth bike though....if I didn't live in the forest that scheme would be tempting.
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  55. #55
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    Doesn't sound like any of us know exactly how the STA works, including myself and especially others (lol). Interesting subject.

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    So I got to spend 2+ hours demoing a Mach 6 today. There are lots of full reviews elsewhere, so here are just a few random thoughts:

    1) At just a shade under 6'3", I definitely want an XL. I was riding a Large and it felt noticeably cramped. 125mm dropper was at insert limit.

    2) DW and Fox Float X are a pretty sweet combo. Noticeably more progressive and composed suspension than the Bronson (my last bike.) Great on small bumps but ramps up quickly in the midstroke, where the Bronson had a more plush (but sometimes wallowy) feel. Landing drops I never felt remotely like I was close to bottoming it out, but rebound dampening settings were important; too much and it was harsh on small bumps, too little and it got unpleasantly springy landing bigger drops. Great lively feel when hitting features and jumps, where the Bronson sometimes felt like I was fighting the suspension to get the bike airborne.

    3) The bike is beautiful. Great lines, and the rear pivots really looks like industrial-design art.

    4) Cable routing is indeed not great. Not awful but lots of bulging and movement around the shock. Wish they'd gone with down the DT and onto the rear triangle like Santa Cruz does.

    5) Stock Honey Badger rear might be good for Arizona, but here in the PNW mud it was pretty useless.

    6) KS Lev Integra (which has been terrible on other bikes due to design where housing rather than cable movement actuates it) actually worked OK. Maybe it's that the routing goes down the DT and then turns into the ST, rather than going through a rubber grommet.

    7) Great efficiency on climbs. Really amazed that a 6+" bike can have this little pedal bob.

    8) Annoyingly, rebound adjust on Float X is impossible to reach with the shock installed. You have to use a small allen wrench to reach in and turn the wheel.

    9) I'm getting one.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Thanks for the confirmation. I don't need to be reminded 5 times what brand bike I am riding. Luckily quality custom vinyl decals are easy to get locally and can camouflage any unwanted branding without looking bad.

    I can see the appeal of the stealth bike though....if I didn't live in the forest that scheme would be tempting.
    The blue definitely has a clear coat over it. On my green it seems as though it is some sort of screen print. I nicked the top tube sticker barely touching it with an allen wrench.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    The blue definitely has a clear coat over it. On my green it seems as though it is some sort of screen print. I nicked the top tube sticker barely touching it with an allen wrench.
    A mild scotchbrite pad could work on your M6. If the decals get old.
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  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    So I got to spend 2+ hours demoing a Mach 6 today. There are lots of full reviews elsewhere, so here are just a few random thoughts:

    1) At just a shade under 6'3", I definitely want an XL. I was riding a Large and it felt noticeably cramped. 125mm dropper was at insert limit.

    2) DW and Fox Float X are a pretty sweet combo. Noticeably more progressive and composed suspension than the Bronson (my last bike.) Great on small bumps but ramps up quickly in the midstroke, where the Bronson had a more plush (but sometimes wallowy) feel. Landing drops I never felt remotely like I was close to bottoming it out, but rebound dampening settings were important; too much and it was harsh on small bumps, too little and it got unpleasantly springy landing bigger drops. Great lively feel when hitting features and jumps, where the Bronson sometimes felt like I was fighting the suspension to get the bike airborne.

    3) The bike is beautiful. Great lines, and the rear pivots really looks like industrial-design art.

    4) Cable routing is indeed not great. Not awful but lots of bulging and movement around the shock. Wish they'd gone with down the DT and onto the rear triangle like Santa Cruz does.

    5) Stock Honey Badger rear might be good for Arizona, but here in the PNW mud it was pretty useless.

    6) KS Lev Integra (which has been terrible on other bikes due to design where housing rather than cable movement actuates it) actually worked OK. Maybe it's that the routing goes down the DT and then turns into the ST, rather than going through a rubber grommet.

    7) Great efficiency on climbs. Really amazed that a 6+" bike can have this little pedal bob.

    8) Annoyingly, rebound adjust on Float X is impossible to reach with the shock installed. You have to use a small allen wrench to reach in and turn the wheel.

    9) I'm getting one.
    Awesome feedback and I like the way you compare it to the Bronson, I think I completely understand what you mean. Sounds similar to the way I have my HD setup with a shimmed air can, running it on medium compression. and even progression thru the travel.

    I'd like to get one, but dang I hate how you have to buy a whole new bike basically. I'm used to swapping frames. I think I'll be on the HD for another year.

  60. #60
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    Prevent cable rub at the top of rear shock body:

    I noticed that using protective tape was causing a squeak as the cables moved over it. Fixed the cable rub but annoying. I had some velcro tape laying around that I used in a similar way to dampen cable noise underneath the toptube of a previous bike (~8 yrs ago), and tried that instead. Seems to work well; no cable rub, no noise.

    Use the soft side of the velcro.


    Cut a small strip and apply it. It blends in well with the black shock body.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post
    Who cares what the numbers are? I bought this bike and it rides great!! True statement.

    But hey, you guys asked.

    fc
    How does it pedal, ride and handle compared to Sight b?
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post
    As far as Seat Tube Angles is concerned, I think 71 degrees is the safe, old-school bet. It'll work for sure.

    But there are new geometries now that are dropper post optimized. Bronson is at 73, Enduro is at 74+, Kona Process is at 74 and the sweet new Orbea Rallon is at 74+. And having ridden all these, I would say steeper is better for climbing and tooling around. And when the going gets going, drop the post.

    So it is not a deal breaker but the 73 degree neighborhood is better than the 71 Seat Angle hood.

    fc
    Lot of it is, that trail/AM bikes are getting slacker and slacker up front, so they steepen the ST to compensate so you can technically pedal and climb without dropper fork if needed and be in good/decent pedalling position when seated. My Rune sits at 65.5 front/74 rear in mid-setting, 65 front/73.5 rear in slack/low setting. I have it in this for the lower BB, but think 65 front is a bit excessive for trail/AM riding even with fork dropped. Think Knolly nailed the numbers for an all purpose AM/trail bike with their Warden that has a 66 front/74 rear, 13.3 BB in slack position. Every bike rides differently dependent upon suspension kinematics, sag, set-up, etc, but those or perfect numbers to me for do-all trail slayer on all terrain (chunk to smooth) and is only reason I probably won't get a M6 (unless my full day demo in Sedona in 2 weeks fully wins me over )
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    Quote Originally Posted by robertj View Post
    Prevent cable rub at the top of rear shock body:

    I noticed that using protective tape was causing a squeak as the cables moved over it. Fixed the cable rub but annoying. I had some velcro tape laying around that I used in a similar way to dampen cable noise underneath the toptube of a previous bike (~8 yrs ago), and tried that instead. Seems to work well; no cable rub, no noise.

    Use the soft side of the velcro.


    Cut a small strip and apply it. It blends in well with the black shock body.
    Great idea. I am also going to make the standoff's taller as well and I think that will take care of it.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yody View Post
    Doesn't sound like any of us know exactly how the STA works, including myself and especially others (lol). Interesting subject.
    I think STA doesn't really mean anything any more, since no modern FS MTB has a straight ST. So you pick an arbitrary point above the ST as the saddle position, then draw a straight line to the BB. But what's that point, and do all manufacturers use the same one? The same is true of "effective" TT; where do you measure from/to to get that number?

    This is why the use of stack/reach numbers has become prevalent. I think that started with tri bikes, which had similar issues (Check out a Cervelo P5 & try to figure out the STA).

  65. #65
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    My input on STA is that the number doesn't mean all that much on its own. It's how your body "meshes" with that number that's important. I've ridden/owned numerous rigs with varying angles. The STA number has little effect on the performance of the bike when you factor in dropper posts.

    Where does it matter for me? My knees. I don't have joint problems, but I can definitely feel more and more pressure in my knees as the seat angle gets slacker. Everyone is obviously going to differ in this regard.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta View Post
    Lot of it is, that trail/AM bikes are getting slacker and slacker up front, so they steepen the ST to compensate so you can technically pedal and climb without dropper fork if needed and be in good/decent pedalling position when seated. My Rune sits at 65.5 front/74 rear in mid-setting, 65 front/73.5 rear in slack/low setting. I have it in this for the lower BB, but think 65 front is a bit excessive for trail/AM riding even with fork dropped. Think Knolly nailed the numbers for an all purpose AM/trail bike with their Warden that has a 66 front/74 rear, 13.3 BB in slack position. Every bike rides differently dependent upon suspension kinematics, sag, set-up, etc, but those or perfect numbers to me for do-all trail slayer on all terrain (chunk to smooth) and is only reason I probably won't get a M6 (unless my full day demo in Sedona in 2 weeks fully wins me over )
    Very true!!

    And with the dropper posts almost mandatory, the downside of steep head tube angle (too far forward on descents) is negated.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta View Post
    How does it pedal, ride and handle compared to Sight b?
    Don't know yet. I have some BS knee issues that are preventing me from riding well.

    But this Pivot is plush. Crazy plush. And the rear/forward balance of the suspension is just so good as they just both sink in as I sit on it.

    Someone bought my Norco yesterday so it is bye-bye now. It's just me and Pivot now.

    fc
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tell me bad things about the Mach 6-p1280136.jpg  

    Tell me bad things about the Mach 6-img_1751.jpg  

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    So I got to spend 2+ hours demoing a Mach 6 today. There are lots of full reviews elsewhere, so here are just a few random thoughts:

    ....

    Incredible observations in such a short span. Where do you live? We could have used you when we took a look at 25 bikes last month.

    fc
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post

    2) DW and Fox Float X are a pretty sweet combo. Noticeably more progressive and composed suspension than the Bronson (my last bike.) Great on small bumps but ramps up quickly in the midstroke, where the Bronson had a more plush (but sometimes wallowy) feel. Landing drops I never felt remotely like I was close to bottoming it out, but rebound dampening settings were important; too much and it was harsh on small bumps, too little and it got unpleasantly springy landing bigger drops. Great lively feel when hitting features and jumps, where the Bronson sometimes felt like I was fighting the suspension to get the bike airborne.
    Sorry for the slight OT, but I'll bring it back to the M6 at the end...

    The wallowy feel is a common complaint of the longer travel SC VPP bikes. My Nomad exhibited that and it was one of my only dislikes about the bike.

    I sent my shock to Avalanche and told Craig what I didn't like about it. He rebuilt it with his SSD [speed specific damping] internals. The Nomad was a new bike afterwards. Lots of mid-stroke support. More poppy off jumps and I could set it and forget it. I'm not up on all the suspension magic about SSD, but it's perfect on the climbs, flats and DH sections without messing with any adjustments [Pro Pedal, etc...]

    If I had bout a Bronson I'd get the shock Avy'd before the first ride.

    Okay...M6 content:

    Avy is now offering rebuild kits for:

    - Fox 34's
    - Fox CTD shocks
    - Fox Float X
    - Pikes [both a new cartridge and rebuild the charger cartridge with avy part]

    That should cover most M6 builds.

    I'll be sending away my rear shock and Pike to get Avy'd next winter after a season of riding. I wish I had done my Nomad sooner!
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  70. #70
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    Agreed about everyone being different. SA only gets you to a point where you can attach the saddle, which is your real point of contact. I've owned steeper SA bikes such as a '00 Truth and 06 Epiphany which used to give me knee pain until I installed a setback seatpost. With the lack of setback droppers much steeper SAs would likely not be a good fit for folks with longer legs.

    Suspension characteristics such as a tendency to squat will effectively reduce the SA under steep climbing, so bikes with this characteristic probably benefit from a steeper SA to even things out. I've owned several bikes with squat tendencies such as FSR, ICT, and 4x4.

    The problem for me with these bikes that employ steeper SAs to give better climbing angles while squatting, is that they are compromised elsewhere, where my weight was too far forward while riding with the seat all the way up. With the DW, I don't think the same compromises need to be made, so steeper SAs are not necessarily required.

    The best thing to do is demo the Mach 6 and see if the SA is really problematic given the DW link characteristics. Trying to compare specs with other manufacturers that have different suspension characteristics is not all that productive; but does make for some interesting discussion.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by robertj View Post
    ...

    The best thing to do is demo the Mach 6 and see if the SA is really problematic given the DW link characteristics. Trying to compare specs with other manufacturers that have different suspension characteristics is not all that productive; but does make for some interesting discussion.

    Excellent, excellent feedback.

    Demoing a bike to understand nuances like this though is very, very difficult. One has to be very experienced, know what to look for and be at place that is techy enough to test the suspension.

    And I will say this about the Mach 6... it will be the hardest bike to demo this year. They don't have a big demo bike program and EVERYBODY wants to demo this bike. 6 friends have asked me already! And we have a shit ton other fancy bikes in the office. But everyone wants this.

    fc
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    Popular bike at the demo, so I ended up riding an XL, which felt fine. I'm 6'1, and ride a large Firebird and medium Glory so maybe I'm just not picky haha. I should have gotten on a large M6 just to see if it felt different. I thought it handled great with the lower BB height as well. I was also surprised how the Kendas on there preformed, as the ones on my Firebird never touched dirt based on prior demo experiences.
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  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by waldo1 View Post
    In currently on a 2014 sworks enduro with 650b wheels and fork but am very tempted to buy a mach 6.
    It's a size large enduro.
    Numbers are deceiving, especially with specialized.
    Their seat tube in relation to the bb is very far forward so people think that the tt is short, but the 'reach' it's big and i think this is why the Command post is a layback/setback design.
    I can imagine the m6 being a similar feel to my old mojo hd's, which i liked. ....until it kept cracking!
    The one thing that did bother me slightly with the dw was that the anti sqaut design did sit up alot on very steep stuff which forced the saddle to hit me in the crown jewels a lot.
    Reviews are saying the m6 dw is even more progressive, does this mean that the anti squat is more pronounced than a hd?
    Im very close to buying this frame and pouring all the kit from the sworks on to this.
    Will my shimano 73mm cranks fit with a conversion bb or is the width different?
    Also i have a 30.9 stealth reverb atm, will this fit or is the post a 31.6?

    Thanks,your advice is appreciated.
    Just order a seat post shim from gravity dropper, your LBS, or eBay. I use them on two of my bikes with no problems.
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    Tell me bad things about the Mach 6

    To continue along the SA vain and to reiterate what jazzanova said, since this is a bike that most of us are pedalling, the seat position should be set up in the most optimal/efficient position in relation to the BB as per bike fit philosophies (ie. knee cap to spindle relationship). Whatever the SA is shouldn't affect where this ideal seat position is behind the BB. In other words on a bike with steeper SA then the seat will be back on the rails and on a bike with shallower SA then the seat will be more forward, either way SAME position relative to BB.

    Is there something I'M missing? Please school me if so.

    As a side effect this makes REACH a more accurate measurement when gauging fit. Maybe REACH measurements should be given by all manufacturers at a common given height above the BB to make it an even better comparison?

    Drewbird, because I'm looking at XLs in Bronson and Mach 6 as well, how did u find the fit and did you consider your seat position? Haven't been able to jump on an XL 6 but definitely prefer the longer fit of the Bronson over my 4 year old HD.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by robnow View Post

    Is there something I'M missing? Please school me if so.

    As a side effect this makes REACH a more accurate measurement when gauging fit. Maybe REACH measurements should be given by all manufacturers at a common given height above the BB to make it an even better comparison?
    Assuming you have enough adjustment in the saddle/seatpost to get the saddle in the optimal position you should do so. Then setup the bars & stem appropriately. I think a lot of people work the opposite way..or adjust both to sort out the saddle-bar distance. That might be a result of buying a frame that's too small and being forced to adjust the saddle as well as the bars to get the bike to fit. If you are buying a bike based on Eff TT and then slide your saddle way forward to deal with a slack STA you are shortening your distance to the bars. So you need to keep that in mind when selecting a frame if you can't get fitted to a bike in person.

    The Reach measurement needs to be done at different heights above the BB because that's the reality of different bikes. No point knowing what the reach to the bottom of the HT on one frame is vs. to the top of the HT on another if you had a fixed distance above the BB. You can't place the bars lower than the top of the HT so that's a logical place to measure reach to on each bike.

    The Stack measurement lets you compare how far above the BB the Reach is measured when comparing bikes.

    Reach and stack based sizing for mountain bikes - Pinkbike
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  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Sorry for the slight OT, but I'll bring it back to the M6 at the end...

    The wallowy feel is a common complaint of the longer travel SC VPP bikes. My Nomad exhibited that and it was one of my only dislikes about the bike.

    I sent my shock to Avalanche and told Craig what I didn't like about it. He rebuilt it with his SSD [speed specific damping] internals. The Nomad was a new bike afterwards. Lots of mid-stroke support. More poppy off jumps and I could set it and forget it. I'm not up on all the suspension magic about SSD, but it's perfect on the climbs, flats and DH sections without messing with any adjustments [Pro Pedal, etc...]

    If I had bout a Bronson I'd get the shock Avy'd before the first ride.

    Okay...M6 content:

    Avy is now offering rebuild kits for:

    - Fox 34's
    - Fox CTD shocks
    - Fox Float X
    - Pikes [both a new cartridge and rebuild the charger cartridge with avy part]

    That should cover most M6 builds.

    I'll be sending away my rear shock and Pike to get Avy'd next winter after a season of riding. I wish I had done my Nomad sooner!

    Interesting...

    The rear suspension on my TBLTc has given grief from day one. Love the bike, hate one thing about the suspension. It blows through the first 4/5 ths of its travel like it wasn't even there. Put spacers in the shock and helped just a little. Bought a second shock with a smaller air can and helped just a little.

    Really liked the bike otherwise but I'm ready to either go to a CCDB, Avy or PUSH treatment. Emailed Avy and got similar info as you did. Sounds good, but I am itching to try a CCDB.

    M6 v. Bronson. When I pulled the trigger on the M6 it was affter some detailed discussion with someone "in the know". Given my distaste for how the VPP felt he recommended the M6. I liked the M6's geo better anyway, but do like SC's threaded BB and cable routing - so it was a toss up. Whether or not the suspension feel was a product of either the VPP or the Fox I don't know. Maybe both. Regardless, I heard the M6 did not have that issue, and I didn't want to spend the first few months on the Bronson trying to remedy another rear suspension issue. So my M6 is supose to be shipping soon.

  77. #77
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    When I chose between M6 and the Bronson-C, I'd already owned a Bronson aluminum. I was also able to order a Bronson-C frame-only without shock from SC for a pretty great price (about half of what an M6 frame retails for).

    I had a fantastic test ride on the M6 on a well-known trail system here in Phoenix. I did have to ride a large and, at 6'2, I should've been on an XL. Overall, the M6 is a tremendous bike.

    My XL Bronson-C is far and away the best bike I've owned. That said, I likely would have been just as happy on the Pivot.

    I think the two are so close in performance that it's going to be something minor that sways someone from one frame to the other.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post

    Decals - holy moly there's a lot of them. 27.5, 155 mm travel, 650b do not have to be decals.
    The murdered out black/red color way is the only one I can deal with on that bike. I don't know who does the graphics work at Pivot but they should go back to 80's-90's era ski gear design work. Fugly. IMO.

    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post
    Seat tube angle is slack at 71.5. The modern bike is much better off with a 74 degree seat angle to make the pedaling position ideal. And since 99% of these bikes will have a dropper post, the seat is out of the way anyway during descending.
    Agreed.
    - -benja- -

  79. #79
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    Here is what is wrong withe Mach 6: The color options are terrible. Where is the green used in the 429C? Where is the Solar Orange from the Les? How about the white/blue from the Phoenix. The blue is a nice color, but the black is not my favorite. C'mon Pivot, would it kill you to give us more color options? Even options you use in your other bikes?

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by aevanlloyd View Post
    Here is what is wrong withe Mach 6: The color options are terrible. Where is the green used in the 429C? Where is the Solar Orange from the Les? How about the white/blue from the Phoenix. The blue is a nice color, but the black is not my favorite. C'mon Pivot, would it kill you to give us more color options? Even options you use in your other bikes?
    +1 - I would love a white M6 and I would take the 429 green no problem, but elegant non-Power Ranger decals please. Having to put your brand marketing lingo on the bike in 8-12 places reeks of insecurity. It's a great bike with a unique silhouette one Pivot logo on either side of the DT and a nice headbadge is all it needs.
    Safe riding,

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  81. #81
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    Re: Tell me bad things about the Mach 6

    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    +1 - I would love a white M6 and I would take the 429 green no problem, but elegant non-Power Ranger decals please. Having to put your brand marketing lingo on the bike in 8-12 places reeks of insecurity. It's a great bike with a unique silhouette one Pivot logo on either side of the DT and a nice headbadge is all it needs.
    I agree.

  82. #82
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    Thanks for pics Francois. Hope the knee heals soon and your able to hammer that new bad boy of yours, looks tits and fully dialed.

    I test rode a Sight C last week and was pretty impressed how snappy, responsive and pedable it was, but still good on square/sharp hits and chatter. My only qualms was that I used the travel a little too easy even with <30% and had harsh bottom out on frame with only +3 foot drop (but was to flat). In general, bike feels like a quick, sharp handling trail/aggro XC bike to me, not quite AM worthy, but they have Range for that.

    I very much have been oogling over the M6 since arrival. Just haven't had a good trail thrashing to fully see how it does yet. Carbon frame looks stout and I like DW, but never really dug the slack STA/high'ish BB (like my old SB66 w/160 fork) and short reach in my size (love short stems too much to give them up for proper fit). Also, guys in the area have already killed the lower pivot bearings that I guess are susceptible to early wear from what I hear that are accelerated by wet/damp enviros of course. Testing in exactly 2 weeks while in Sedona, can't wait!
    Ride On!

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta View Post
    Testing in exactly 2 weeks while in Sedona, can't wait!
    Two words... Hi Line. Oh wait Hiline is one word. Damn it.

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by aevanlloyd View Post
    Two words... Hi Line. Oh wait Hiline is one word. Damn it.
    Yes indeed, but for me it's usually three words..Hi-line, Hangover, Hogs!
    Ride On!

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    Not trying to hijack the thread, but is Hangover fun (like hogs/hiline) or just hyper technical? The trip reports ive heard about made it sound like a gimick ride.

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by aevanlloyd View Post
    Not trying to hijack the thread, but is Hangover fun (like hogs/hiline) or just hyper technical? The trip reports ive heard about made it sound like a gimick ride.
    I think it is rad and definitely worth a ride. Some good flow, but also a lot of exposure, so you got's to be on your game some. It is a step up in tech from Hi-line. So, if you can rally HL with no probs, then you might be fine with HO. I think it is definitely better than Hogs and not a lot of people typically on it (better than HL in that regard as well since it can get quite crowed especially with hiker traffic on Baldwin/Templeton to finish the loop). My only beef with HO is that it is a tad short and a little hard to route find thru Cow Pies at first. Last time I rode it, I did it twice with using the road to climb back up (I thought it was that good and so unique), then finish with lower Mund's back to car. Good stuff, but so many good trails in Sedona that is tough to hit them all on limited time like I usually have.
    Ride On!

  87. #87
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    STA comment from the Pinkbike M6 Review:

    A hidden benefit of the Mach 6’’s slack, 71.5-degree seat angle is that it allows for a longer top tube without adversely lengthening the bike’s wheelbase. This makes the chassis more maneuverable, and also places the rider in a natural ‘attack’ position between the wheels. The effect is that the rider is rarely caught out of position when faced with a surprise corner, climb or descent.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by robnow View Post
    Drewbird, because I'm looking at XLs in Bronson and Mach 6 as well, how did u find the fit and did you consider your seat position? Haven't been able to jump on an XL 6 but definitely prefer the longer fit of the Bronson over my 4 year old HD.
    I demoed a L M6, but was on an XL Bronson. I will buy an XL M6. So I can't really directly comment on an XL-XL comparison. I don't think the difference will be that big in the fit. The biggest diff. on paper is the taller HT and shorter reach on the XL M6. These numbers are related of course, since the taller HT moves the point at which they measure the reach closer to the BB. I was running my Bronson with ~1" spacers and an up-angled stem, so with that setup the "effective" reach between the two is closer.

    Demoing the L, it did feel shorter (obviously) than the XL Bronson. I think this will mostly be fixed by the XL size. I do think the M6's slacker SA and shorter stays will put me a bit more over the rear wheel. This makes the bike fun to ride-easy to manual, snappy around turns, playful on jumps- but did make the front wander a bit on steep climbs. But I'm talking so steep they were barely pedalable. All in all, I think it was great and I'm getting one.

  89. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    STA comment from the Pinkbike M6 Review:
    That's a good review. I agree about the STA aspect as well.

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    Decals can't be removed. They are not stickers, they're thin and (I think) painted on so you couldn't peel them off in one piece. Same as the S.C. Bronson, Ibis Mojo and other "matte" finished bikes. After looking at all 3 colors in the flesh today I'll be going with a Stealth Carbon.
    I was at the shop checking the colors out today as well. I'll be going with the Blue.... eventually.

  91. #91
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    Tell me bad things about the Mach 6

    Bad thing - Everybody wants one!

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanopatoni View Post
    Bad thing - Everybody wants one!
    +1 - but it's not a M6 thing. I had 3-4 bikes on my short list and all of them were a 3-6 month wait.

    That's just the way it goes when you want a brand new popular high-end bike that's not made by the hundreds.

    Living in Canada doesn't help either!
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  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    +1 - but it's not a M6 thing. I had 3-4 bikes on my short list and all of them were a 3-6 month wait.

    That's just the way it goes when you want a brand new popular high-end bike that's not made by the hundreds.

    Living in Canada doesn't help either!
    Oh it's a Mach 6 thing. The wait time for this bike is long and about to get longer.

    fc
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  94. #94
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    I know quite a few people waiting for high-end bikes and they aren't M6's. For whatever reason the supply-demand thing is out of whack for more than just the M6.
    Safe riding,

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  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I know quite a few people waiting for high-end bikes and they aren't M6's. For whatever reason the supply-demand thing is out of whack for more than just the M6.
    I'm sure the M6 will be hard to get. I know the Ibis Mojo HD and Ripley (even after it was actually released) took forever, as have several Yetis. Even the Spesh Enduro 29er was impossible to get until quite recently (and still not easy.) Brand new carbon bikes, especially from boutique manufacturers, are always hard to get, and are usually produced and released one size at a time. These companies are working with factories in Asia that often produce other stuff and the time required to make bike frames right just means it's not that fast.

    That said, with the popularity of the M6... I'd get your order in now if you want one by the summer!

  96. #96
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    I want an aluminum M6. I know they aren't available, but I'm pretty sure they exist.
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  97. #97
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    +2

    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    +1 - I would love a white M6 and I would take the 429 green no problem, but elegant non-Power Ranger decals please. Having to put your brand marketing lingo on the bike in 8-12 places reeks of insecurity. It's a great bike with a unique silhouette one Pivot logo on either side of the DT and a nice headbadge is all it needs.
    +2 Pivot r U paying attention
    "My GREATEST FEAR is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my watches for what I told her I paid for them."

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    So what are we saying here, Mach6 MII will be the bike 'That Rules Them All?'

    I can see Cocalis and his cohorts doing a little jig right now!

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by ISharted View Post
    So what are we saying here, Mach6 MII will be the bike 'That Rules Them All?'

    I can see Cocalis and his cohorts doing a little jig right now!
    Changing the finish/decals doesn't require a redesign - just fire the art guy and hire somebody who isn't a Power Ranger fan. With the cost of carbon moulds I don't see companies like Pivot getting into fast model revamps which is a good thing. Get the bike right and then sell them for 3-4yrs.
    Safe riding,

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  100. #100
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    After reading through this thread, I'm even more stoked that I bought mine back in October!

    I won't nerd out on angles or inches, other than to say, my Mach 6 is hands down the most fun bike I've ever ridden. The moment I jumped on it, it felt like it was custom-made for me. So well balanced and holds its line so well, even in tight, fast and loose dirt.

    Probably the biggest factor I noticed when riding this bike is how much feedback I get from it before $hit goes sideways. I can feel the bike start to slip out but it doesn't do it all at once and it gives me just enough time to correct position and keep going. On other bikes, by that point, the front wheel was washing out and I was most certainly going down.

    Can someone explain what that's all about?

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