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Thread: DW Link bikes

  1. #1
    jddist
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    DW Link bikes

    Just wanted to see if others experience the same thing that I am with my new DW Link bike (Pivot Firebird). I come from riding a 575 for last 2 years. I ride up very steep tech stuff and then back down every ride. Lots of rocks. What I am noticing with the firebird is that the bike pedals great if the suspension is not being active. (ie. flat trail is ok) but once you have to pedal while the rear suspension is active (ie climbing tech stuff) I start to notice a bit of pedal feedback/kickback. Where I really start to notice the side affect of this is about an hour into my rides. At this point I notice my legs getting really fatigued where before I could go 3 hours no problem. Just picked up a yeti 7 to compare against and the 1st ride was totally noticeable, no leg fatigue. I believe, maybe incorrectly, it is due to the DW Link using pedal power to keep the rear from bobbing (anti-squat). I have played with different sag and other settings but still notice it. Bike does go downhill butter smooth though. Anyone else having similar experience.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Pivotal figure
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    My experience has been exactly the opposite. I'm able to longer rides, at a faster pace than on any of my old bikes (even ones that were setup lighter). 90% of my riding is in very technical terrain too.
    Desert Sunset Calls/Upward, Pain, Perseverance/Welcome Solitude

  3. #3
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    I've ridden a 575 around my local loop. It's a loop that I always ride the Firebird around because there is plenty of techy stuff. I've also ridden my old Nomad around the same loop. From worst to best I would rate the bikes like this for technical stuff: 575 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------> Nomad -----------------> Firebird.

    When I was running 2 x 9 on the Firebird I noticed some very slight pedal feedback in the 22 tooth granny ring and 4th on the cassette. That was it. The pedal feedback never annoyed me as much as it did on the Nomad that had it across a wider gear range. The negatives I found of the 575 included the rising rear end under brakes, flexi rear end, suspension bob, very poor climbing on technical terrain, mid stroke wallow and blowing through it's travel too easily. This was with it set up properly.

  4. #4
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    If your body is not situated efficiently over the wheels and the bike your pedalling will suffer. Gears and chainrings do not create the problem. If my Iron Horse 6POINT starts to sink on a long climb, all I do is get behind the crankset some more so it scoots away.

  5. #5
    Black Lion
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    keep in mind is that the bikes were designed to run in the middle chainrings for the most part.
    Also 30 plus percent sag is best.
    Voltron

  6. #6
    Jamin, Applesause, No?
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    Sounds like a POBNIB.

  7. #7
    jddist
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    Thanks for all the great feedback. One thing I have not done a lot of is playing with the seat position, so I will try that and see what happens. I will say that in addition to going down great, the small and square bump compliance is way better than the 7. Riding both back to back on familiar trails really makes it easy to feel how the single pivot 7 gets caught up on things where the DWL Firebird just feels like it rolls right over smooth. Just another example of how the only way to really tell how a bike rides is to spend a fair amount of time riding one on familiar trails. Quick demos just don't do it in my opinion.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by istvisinet
    Thanks for all the great feedback. One thing I have not done a lot of is playing with the seat position, so I will try that and see what happens. I will say that in addition to going down great, the small and square bump compliance is way better than the 7. Riding both back to back on familiar trails really makes it easy to feel how the single pivot 7 gets caught up on things where the DWL Firebird just feels like it rolls right over smooth. Just another example of how the only way to really tell how a bike rides is to spend a fair amount of time riding one on familiar trails. Quick demos just don't do it in my opinion.
    Don't just assume you cannot get-up and spin a section, out of the saddle as opposed to in-it. Transitioning between the 2 manners of climbing quick like this makes this bike easier to control too. Give it a go.

  9. #9
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    I ride a dw 5spot and can relate to some of what you're saying.

    In the middle ring I have never felt any pedal feedback, but while pedaling in the granny ring I can definitely feel feedback climbing up ledges. It is a very minor sensation, feels like a brief increase in resistance against whichever leg happens to be driving the crank at that moment. If I'm well into a long ride and the legs are fried, I suppose it could be described as increased pain. That said, the dw-link design is more efficient than anything else I have ridden, which is pretty much everything, hardtails not included. I've been on the dw spot for over a year now and recently had a short spin on a single pivot, wow, that really made me appreciate the dw. The single pivot felt completely inefficient and power draining compared to the dw, I wanted my bike back immediately.

    Anyways, back to your problem. Someone mentioned saddle position, this is very important on the dw-link bikes IME. Coming from horst-link and single pivot I was conditioned that getting weight forward while climbing was critical, on my dw 5spot I have found it to be less important. Try sliding your saddle back on the rails a bit, and resist the urge to transfer your weight forward as much while climbing.

    Something else to look at is fork length. What are you running on your Firebird? I have a talas 36 on my bike, and initially used the 130mm setting for climbs and 160mm for everything else, seemed logical... but after time I found that the bike actually climbs better with the fork fully extended.

    my .02

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