Results 1 to 24 of 24
  1. #1
    Cumbria, England.
    Reputation: D45yth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    353

    Tripods, do many of you actually take one riding with you?

    Hi, I was wondering if many of you take a tripod with you whilst out taking pics on your bike? I've looked at a few that are quite compact and light, I do wonder on their stability when used with a DSLR though.

    Are there any that anyone can recommend or am I better off using something else? I've also considered the biggest Gorillapod, turning my bike upside down and fixing it to the underside of the frame (or anything else nearby). A friend has told me to just use a beanbag.

    Any suggestions? I should point out that I'll be self-shooting some video too, so something that needs to be held is out of the question.

    Thanks.
    - The seasons blow away, but the love is just the same -

  2. #2
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    2,493
    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  3. #3
    Cumbria, England.
    Reputation: D45yth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    353
    Gitzo stuff is a bit out of my price range! I have looked at similar ones made by Giottos, Manfrotto and Benro though.
    - The seasons blow away, but the love is just the same -

  4. #4
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    2,493
    ^The beanbag is a good idea, or just use your camel pack, which is what I generally do.
    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  5. #5
    Kathleen in AZ
    Reputation: DurtGurl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    5,137
    I've also been shopping around for a tripod that is small enough to fit into the pack, but sturdy enough for the DSLR on rough terrain. I have a gorrillapod that I bought for off-camera flash which claims to hold 2.2 lbs. Here is what happens when your T3i and Rokinon 14mm fall over using a tripod not up for the job. Thankfully it fell into my hands and not the rocks!!



    The aluminum versions of the Sirui T-005 and the Benro MePhoto are at the top of my list - both are under $140. If anyone has any experience with these, or other moderately prices small tripods, please chime in! I'm a bit worried that the twisty leg locks will be too bothersome as compared to a lever style clamp.

  6. #6
    Cumbria, England.
    Reputation: D45yth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    353
    I think I could be going with one of these:

    A Velbon Geo 440 or 540. The second number in the model numbers indicates how many sections the legs are made up of...the 4 section ones packing down to a smaller size. They're light and the carry bag can be fitted between the legs (instead of hanging from the hook) to be used as a rock bag. I can get a good deal on one if I buy it with a ball-head too.
    Last edited by D45yth; 11-28-2012 at 03:20 PM. Reason: Deleted photos
    - The seasons blow away, but the love is just the same -

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikerjohn64's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    162
    +1 for the Gorillapod.

    I've ridden with tripods before but have thought the GP would do more just of value per use.

    A bean bag works but very limited to surface mount and carrying another weighted item.

    I've often thought of getting several GP; that way I can mount my flashes to the left of an incoming subject and also behind the subject on tree limbs; rocks etc to create added lighting touches.

    3 would be an ideal number of GP in various sizes and would not add too much weight with the greatest flexibility and ease/speed of use.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    157
    Another vote for a gorillapod. I keep one in my car. You never know when you will need one. I actually have two, the small one (it can be useful) and the large one, which is definitely useful. A tree branch a, frame, almost anything you can wrap it around becomes your 'tripod'. They're cheap enough to try out w/o breaking the bank.

  9. #9
    Cumbria, England.
    Reputation: D45yth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    353
    I think I might still buy the above tripod and get someone to buy me a Gorillapod for Christmas. The thing that bothers me about the Gorillapods is getting the camera high enough for certain shots. I know they're good and have their uses. I'm just not convinced that they're the best all-round option for me. I ride on a lot of open fells around here, where there won't be anywhere to attach one to and don't want it setup so it looks like it's constantly looking up at me.

    I never mentioned that whatever I buy will have to cover most other uses too. I've just gone back to being a student (mature!) and can't afford lots of different options. When folk see my bikes they think I've lots of money...I'm just a fanatic, even when working all my spare money went on bike related stuff rather than anything else!

    Thanks for the input.
    - The seasons blow away, but the love is just the same -

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    1,120
    Maybe I am not all that creative, but I can't see too many situations where I'd want to use a tripod on the trail. I do use gorillapods all the time for attaching flashes to things, but even the biggest one is no match for a DSLR unless you are using teeny-tiny lenses.

  11. #11
    Cumbria, England.
    Reputation: D45yth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    353
    Quote Originally Posted by epic View Post
    Maybe I am not all that creative, but I can't see too many situations where I'd want to use a tripod on the trail. I do use gorillapods all the time for attaching flashes to things, but even the biggest one is no match for a DSLR unless you are using teeny-tiny lenses.
    It depends what you're wanting to take pictures of. The kind of pictures I want to take are more like landscape shots rather than closeups of the rider. I'm studying for an outdoor media degree at present and need some photos as part of my assignments...my pictures will have to include someone doing something in the outdoors. My main problem is that most of my friends don't get out on their bikes as much as they'd like, so don't want to go on rides where you're stopping every 5 minutes (for me to take pics of them). Due to this I'll have to do a lot self-shots using a remote or intervalometer. I'll also be documenting some of my bikepacking trips next year so the tripod will be used for filming too.
    - The seasons blow away, but the love is just the same -

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikerjohn64's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    162
    Quote Originally Posted by D45yth View Post
    It depends what you're wanting to take pictures of. The kind of pictures I want to take are more like landscape shots rather than closeups of the rider. I'm studying for an outdoor media degree at present and need some photos as part of my assignments...my pictures will have to include someone doing something in the outdoors. My main problem is that most of my friends don't get out on their bikes as much as they'd like, so don't want to go on rides where you're stopping every 5 minutes (for me to take pics of them). Due to this I'll have to do a lot self-shots using a remote or intervalometer. I'll also be documenting some of my bikepacking trips next year so the tripod will be used for filming too.
    Then if you don't own a TP already; then you need one for your needs. If it was for me; I would tend to go for the 440 model a bit of both world of portability and sturdiness with 3 section of legs(4 sections I would think might be not as firm). A ballhead is also a good choice; especially if you can have Quick Release plate system to use with it.

    Which ever TP you do end up buying; remember that they are like lenses. Many kinds for different occasions. I own an arsenal of TP's and they are all used differently so do keep in mind that there will be limits to whatever you do get.

  13. #13
    Cumbria, England.
    Reputation: D45yth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    353
    Thanks bikerjohn, I never worded my original question very well...I should have asked what tripods are people carrying whilst on their bikes. I have access to the uni's media stores so I'm not in a great rush to have to buy lots of kit. The kit I am buying is stuff that is geared towards me doing things while out on the bike or other outdoor activities. The uni's tripods aren't the best for this as they're not compact nor light.

    I take it you meant that you would go for the 430 too. Do you think I'd be ok with the 4 leg model if I always used a weight with it?
    - The seasons blow away, but the love is just the same -

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikerjohn64's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    162
    Gotcha.
    The 4 leg model would be ok if you hung your camera pack from the "knuckle" of the tripod to add stability. That way you can take advantage of the model that will allow for the tallest setup.
    I'm not sure if that manufacturer has an option also to add a longer centre column but that too might offer even more height.

  15. #15
    Cumbria, England.
    Reputation: D45yth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    353
    UPDATE: I've bought a tripod and head...went for a Sirui T-1004X and a K-10X ball-head. Very pleased with them, combined weight is 1480g so not too light and packs down to 41cm with the head still attached. Even though I got a great deal buying it from Poland I still couldn't afford the carbon version as I've just bought a camera to attach to it too!
    - The seasons blow away, but the love is just the same -

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikerjohn64's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    162
    ^^Great to hear. Post some pics if you get a chance!

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    20

    Mono Pod

    I think if you think you can hold your camera still with a mono-pod that would be a better option it would be alot lighter and quite a bit cheaper even for a carbon-fiber.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    27
    Like you, I'm also on tight budget and have been searching for a sturdy, light and small tripod. I finally found Sirui T-1205X. I have written a short review here: AhXiong Photologue: Tripod Review - Sirui T-1205X

    So far I'm very happy with it. This tripod fits well on my Lowepro Flipside Sport AW: Lowepro | Flipside Series

    Hope this helps

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    51
    If you are shooting on the telephoto end then a monopod is another option.

  20. #20
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    2,493
    Came across this lightweight travel tripod, wondering if anyone has used one? The price seems a little incredible even if it isn't perfect. It's from Costco so returning it shouldn't be a problem.

    Dolica 57
    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    430
    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    Came across this lightweight travel tripod, wondering if anyone has used one? The price seems a little incredible even if it isn't perfect. It's from Costco so returning it shouldn't be a problem.

    Dolica 57
    let me know what you think im in the market for an affordable small tripod for biking and going on family trips.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    51
    With 5 sections per leg I wouldn't expect it to be very stable when fully extended. Even the super expensive travel tripods are pretty shaky for telephoto (200mm and longer), macro or even HDR use unless you weight them down considerably (and avoid using the centre column). So unless you just want something for a quick snap or self photo I wouldn't bother bringing one with you on a trip.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    29
    The SURI I have is very sturdy and very portable I think it was about 100$. Another consideration if you are going to the trouble of taking along the tripod is the mount you use on the tripod. If you are using a short lens most types of mounts should be ok. Here's what I use for some for given lenses & applications.
    Short lens - Small 1.5" ball head saves weight and bulk
    Video - Fluid head
    Longer lens or if there is a need for more stability on a short lens - 3" ball head
    Long lens 200mm or greater - Gimbal mount
    For me one size does not fit all and I will generally suffer the weight penalty in order to carry the gear.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    3

    Good job! There is a new one out

    I keep one in the car at all times as it's handy to hold the phone for GPS-nav, Then I take it with me on the ride .

    Keizus | smart accessories for smart phones

    Check it out!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •