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  1. #1
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    Quote Originally Posted by randyharris View Post
    I went with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-TS3 ruggedized camera so that I wouldn't have to worry about that...
    I had that same camera. I used it for kayak fishing in southern California. It resides on the bottom of the Pacific Ocean now

  2. #2
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    I'd get a nice camera bag- case logic makes a sweet one with a "hammock" built in and throw it in yer camelbak. And definitely get a lens filter. Polarized filters are nice for landscapes and will cut glare nicely but really don't do well at night photo.

  3. #3
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    If you're really only concerned about dust, then putting it inside a closed hydration pack should do the trick. Make sure the hydration pack has a separate place for the actual reservoir though, wouldn't want it to accidentally leak all over your new camera!

    The downside to that is that it's not exactly easily accessible- every time you want to shoot you have to pull your pack off and get it out. For the past few years, whenever I'd bring the DSLR out on a ride, I've been using a ThinkTank Digital Holster 10. The velcro securely fastens to the side of my pack's waist belt, and I attach a carabiner to the D ring on the camera bag to the hydration pack to A. keep it from sliding forward, and B. as backup to prevent the camera from falling to the ground if the velcro fails (which has never happened). The bag comes with it's own little rain jacket too. :-)

    There's a photo of it here: http://www.thinktankphoto.com/produc...ter-10-v2.aspx
    but note that it's full extended in the photo. On any ride I've ever been on, I usually leave the "Pop Down" zipped up so that it's much shorter overall.

    --Mark

  4. #4
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    Protecting your camera

    Hey all....I've been slowly sucked into the world of photography via my blog and just recently took another leap and have ordered a Canon T1i.......relax playa hatters, I did not use my unemployment money (that would take a lot of unemployment). I used airline miles which were set to expire.

    My question: How do some of you protect your glass when riding? My primary concern is dust. Thanks in advance for your beta.

  5. #5
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    For storage, a large zip lock baggie would work or you can use a small Dry Bag like they use for Kayaking.

  6. #6
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    I went with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-TS3 ruggedized camera so that I wouldn't have to worry about that...
    ONE SHOX, ONE GEAR, LOTS of FUN! www.TrailFu.com My Rides

  7. #7
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    Lens cap....

  8. #8
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    Get a polarized lens filter ... it helps with glare and also protects the lens

  9. #9
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    when I take my DLSR...I use a real camera bag (Lowpro) inside my Osprey. so the dust factor is dealt with by that bag. gives it a little extra cush. of course more weight, but that just makes you stronger.

    water worries me more. so I have a rain fly for my Osprey.....well need to modify one for it.
    b

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by brianc View Post
    water worries me more. so I have a rain fly for my Osprey.....well need to modify one for it.

    isn't there a rain cover in the bottom outside pocket. Took me over a year to re-remember I had one on my Osprey. I've never have used it yet...which is why I always forget.

  11. #11
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    Not on my original talon 22. Steal ing one from my old dueter
    b

  12. #12
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    Very Nice camera, I prefer Zip Lock Freezer bag wrapped in a tshirt shielded by 'o l camelback - toting around the "L" glass gets a bit heavy.... however,the pic's are worth it !

  13. #13
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    I'm gathering that there's no happy medium....I can't just whip the bastard out and start shooting....I have to slow folks down....unwrap my piece...and then shoot.....that's a major bummer unless I can find some kind of action sling for it.....P&S has it's surefire advantages, but I'm hooked on the capability of real glass....just looking for beta on protection and use in action situations.

  14. #14
    parenting for gnarness
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    put it inside your knee pads, you don't use em.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by chollaball View Post
    put it inside your knee pads, you don't use em.
    Don't hate me because I make you look purdy...as hard as that may be.....


  16. #16
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    All you can do is use a ND or polarizing filter and don't change lenses in dusty conditions, the rest is a give and take. If you keep it accessible you risk damage in some way, if you keep it packed away you are not likely to use it much while actually riding. I think that lugging a dslr around is a commitment to photos and not as much to riding. I'm sure it's worth it if that is your goal for the day.

    Look at the DSLR days as "photo" days and use a point and shoot for "riding" days.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride View Post
    All you can do is use a ND or polarizing filter and don't change lenses in dusty conditions, the rest is a give and take. If you keep it accessible you risk damage in some way, if you keep it packed away you are not likely to use it much while actually riding. I think that lugging a dslr around is a commitment to photos and not as much to riding. I'm sure it's worth it if that is your goal for the day.

    Look at the DSLR days as "photo" days and use a point and shoot for "riding" days.
    +1 I think that thing shoots some K/A video as well looking forward to some spectacular posts!

  18. #18
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    I have the Canon 20D and that thing is tougher than you'de expect. I've gone OTB with it in my camelbak with just a jersy wrapped around it. that was a few years back and it still fires no issues. My 3 & 4 yearr olds have used it.

    As someone else said if you are going to be shooting it is a commitment to that more than riding. My camera bag is Lowpro drypro 200 and it works awesome to keep the water and sand out. I strapped the bag on and went wakeboarding with it. No Leaks! It's heavy and not fun to lug around. If I had to do it again I would pick up a smaller bag like the Drypro 100 or Dakine Photo Mission. Take fewer lenses with you that helps. You can always stack a cheap plastic ND Haze filter on top of your glass or the polarizer.

    Whatever bag you get make sure it is supportive and has good straps. Sucks balls when you are tearing up trails and have the bag ziggin when you are zaggin.

    If you want to try out a canon 70-200 4.0 or 1.8 IS, or Sigma 10-17 1.? or take a look at the lowpro let me know and we can hit the trails.
    Got Daytons on the Motha Ship - Cube

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattyBoyR6 View Post
    I have the Canon 20D and that thing is tougher than you'de expect. I've gone OTB with it in my camelbak with just a jersy wrapped around it. that was a few years back and it still fires no issues. My 3 & 4 yearr olds have used it.

    As someone else said if you are going to be shooting it is a commitment to that more than riding. My camera bag is Lowpro drypro 200 and it works awesome to keep the water and sand out. I strapped the bag on and went wakeboarding with it. No Leaks! It's heavy and not fun to lug around. If I had to do it again I would pick up a smaller bag like the Drypro 100 or Dakine Photo Mission. Take fewer lenses with you that helps. You can always stack a cheap plastic ND Haze filter on top of your glass or the polarizer.

    Whatever bag you get make sure it is supportive and has good straps. Sucks balls when you are tearing up trails and have the bag ziggin when you are zaggin.

    If you want to try out a canon 70-200 4.0 or 1.8 IS, or Sigma 10-17 1.? or take a look at the lowpro let me know and we can hit the trails.
    Thanks for the offer and beta.....I'll keep you in mind...if I take you up on it, we'll have to ride together....I'd never want to borrow some glass and not at least repay the favor in some photo's of the enabler. As for packs...I'm already practiced in the rapid dismount, reach into pack via one arm unsling, tear the camera out of my current setup which is a 3/4 form factor (Sony alpha NEX-3 w/ standard 18-55 lens)....I'm hoping for something I can internally rig inside of my existing pack so that I can unsling one arm...unzip pack, unzip internal camera pouch and shoot.....I'm not worried about water....I'm not going wet with this thing....yet...and if that's the case, I'll dry bag it just like my previous cameras...which there is no way around easy access anyways...so the point becomes moot.

  20. #20
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    Lopro's are nice but a single use pack ... only good for camera gear. I have been searching for a pack that if camera AND travel friendly.... not so much for riding though.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maadjurguer View Post
    Hey all....I've been slowly sucked into the world of photography via my blog and just recently took another leap and have ordered a Canon T1i. My question: How do some of you protect your glass when riding? My primary concern is dust. Thanks in advance for your beta.
    Since everything is all jacked up I'm not sure but I think this is the original post...

    Putting your camera in any type of bag is going to control almost all the dust you need to worry about.

    All your lenses should have a UV0 filter on them for protection. It's $20 or so and when it gets damaged or so filthy you can't clean it you replace it. Much cheaper than a new lens. None of my glass has never been touched by any type of brush or cleaning solvent because of this. You could use a ND or Polarizing filter as suggested but both of those are going to cause you to lose light. In some cases this is a desired effect. Many times it's not. I have both and put them on top of the UV0 when they are needed.

    The Think Tank Holster someone else pointed out is a good option. I've got one but haven't taken it on an MTB ride yet. That would be your best option for protection and ease of access. And, ease of access is why I haven't brought my DSLR on any MTB rides. It's not like my little P&S I keep in my Osprey's waist belt pocket: Easy to get to. Plus, carrying a big DSLR & lens is heavy.

    One of these Think Tank Belt Packs might be of use. I've got the Speed Freak and while it's probably too big for most MTB adventures it carries a lot of stuff comfortably. I've been thinking about buying a smaller version for hiking.

    I've been itching to pull the trigger on one of these chest packs by Clik. They look promising but I need more camera bags like I need another rectum.

    The last upgrade would be a serious camera made for abuse. I've put my 1D through plenty of torture and it still keeps rocking. Dunked it fully submerged in a creek and it took perfect pictures after retrieving it. It's not recommended but water & dust mean nothing to a heavy duty camera. But, they are expensive.

  22. #22
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    Anyone know who carries the Think Tank Holster in town ? I'd love to look at one of them.

  23. #23
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    clik bags makes a not inexpensive hydration pack with a padded easy access DSLR storage area.

    http://www.clikelite.com/products/compact-sport/

    It looks like it would be fast to get your camera in and out of.

    I am using an older camelbak hawg with the helmet sling on the back and instead of a helmet i put my Lowe SLR bag in there and then my T1i. It is relatively convenient, padded to some extent from my body by the water bladder and the bag material plus the padded lowe case. I am looking for a way to retain it in there perhaps I might sew in some velcro but like all DIY project there is going to be some development but at least I had all the components for it already, just added the camera.

    On a camera note, when you get yours let me know if you figure out how to get it from blowing the highlights that are so prevalent in our deserts, especially in high silica content rocks and trails.
    Try this: HTFU

  24. #24
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    I carry the Nikon D40 with the 18-105 in a Tamrak Zoom 4. I modified my hydra pak to allow clips and carry it on my chest sorta like the clik link showed. I'm not particularly fond of the Zoom 4 case, it is easy to get out, using a single snap buckle, and it does protect the camera. The chest carry is the quickest to retrieve, but on techy trails gets in the way. Recently, in Fruita on Moore Fun, kept hitting the camera with the knees, so had to move it to the back.

    On the protection of the Tamrak, I was carrying it in the back of my pack, and it took a jump out of the pack (user error). Tumbled down the trail beside me and as we both came to a stop, picked it up and most was fine. The UV filter was shattered, since I had the lens cap in the bottom of the case, but other than that I am still using and carrying.
    Dust? eh, just a hazard of carrying or use a prime so you don't use that airpump also known as a zoom. IMO, switching between lenses is where dust happens, not necessarily on the trail. I have a couple specs on the sensor, just set up an action in lightroom or aperture to auto remove on the images you want to keep, or send it in periodically for a clean.
    I am curious on the NEX3 though, I was looking at that trying to reduce the footprint I carry, but evidently you aren't as happy with it, or are looking for different perspective which is only granted by glass. The 16mm prime wasn't wide enough for some of the stuff I wanted. The 10-24 was all kinds of fun on the D40.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockcrusher View Post

    On a camera note, when you get yours let me know if you figure out how to get it from blowing the highlights that are so prevalent in our deserts, especially in high silica content rocks and trails.
    Mike Curiak has already given some beta on the highlight issue with Canon.....set the Exposure Compensation default value at -.7 or -1.0.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by cookiedough View Post
    I am curious on the NEX3 though, I was looking at that trying to reduce the footprint I carry, but evidently you aren't as happy with it, or are looking for different perspective which is only granted by glass. The 16mm prime wasn't wide enough for some of the stuff I wanted. The 10-24 was all kinds of fun on the D40.
    There is nothing wrong with the NEX3 per se, I just want to go full DSLR for even more functionality and options. I still see having the NEX3 for lightweight rides....my photos took a huge leap in quality when I transitioned from a P&S to the NEX3.....I just see another leap with the T1i given what I want to do. The NEX3 is almost a P&S in terms of it's ease of use...but it still allows manual control over focus, aperture and shutter speed which is really nice if you want to go completely manual. The form factor is obviously, the best thing about it....very nice....truly the best of two worlds.

  27. #27
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    Another trick that seems to work with the Canon's is to set the white balance to "cloudy" on bright days. That combined with setting the exposure level a bit negative and setting the color to vivid or saturated makes the pics pop a little. That's just my experience from when I had a Rebel XT. Nothing scientific.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockcrusher View Post
    On a camera note, when you get yours let me know if you figure out how to get it from blowing the highlights that are so prevalent in our deserts, especially in high silica content rocks and trails.
    Proper exposure?

    Just curious as to what the issue is. I'm sure we all know a camera can't get an infinite amount of data using any given light source. Something has to give and it's either blown highlights or muddy shadows.

    That's why when I'm shooting stuff that I may want to keep I shoot RAW. After the fact I can go back to the RAW image and get + or - 2 to 3 stops in the image and make an HDR blend either manually or with software.

    It's an extra step or two but it sounds like from your description the shot with blown highlights just can't be taken without losing detail in the highs or lows.

  29. #29
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    Based on the comments, I'm assuming all in this discussion know that the eye captures about 17 stops of light, while the best digitals capture around 11? So, IMO, the art isn't really about "capturing it all" but about the story and using the tools you have with the limitations they have telling the story. I mean, black shadows add mystery, which our brains respond to. It's the art of what story you are trying to tell, as in the big gap jump photos, you either need the kicker or the landing to show scale, but having both just puts too much in the photo -
    Everybody knows you can get a white, gray and black card to all show up as grey in the photo, right?
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by cookiedough View Post
    I carry the Nikon D40 with the 18-105 in a Tamrak Zoom 4. I modified my hydra pak to allow clips and carry it on my chest sorta like the clik link showed. I'm not particularly fond of the Zoom 4 case, it is easy to get out, using a single snap buckle, and it does protect the camera. The chest carry is the quickest to retrieve, but on techy trails gets in the way. Recently, in Fruita on Moore Fun, kept hitting the camera with the knees, so had to move it to the back.
    just got one of these to use with my nikon http://www.adorama.com/catlite.tpl?o...emulti&sku=CCV

    havent had it out yet. wonder if knees will be a problem. letcha know.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    "May your trails be winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view." - Ed Abbey
    http://rockychrysler.com/

  31. #31
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    @rock - that looks kinda cool, am curious about it.

    oh, and BTW - killer header pic on the blog

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by cookiedough View Post
    Based on the comments, I'm assuming all in this discussion know that the eye captures about 17 stops of light, while the best digitals capture around 11
    The problem isn't as much HOW MUCH light a camera can capture. You're eyes may be capable of 17 stops of light (source?) but just like a camera we can not see 17 stops of light right in front of us. We can look at a dark scene and see detail then move our eyes to the brightest section of the scene and get detail there but our eyes are not capable of getting detail from light AND dark areas at the same time any more than our digital sensors can. Our apertures (eyes) are constantly opening and closing to meter what's in front of us correctly so we think we can see this enormous amount of light.

    What matters is how much the sensor is capable of capturing in one image. I don't remember the number any longer but a quick Google found a moderate consensus of 5-9 stops that a camera can capture. If we assume the 17 stops is accurate then the camera is only able to capture one half to one third the light that the human eye can see.

    So, that means that depending on what you are photographing your camera could be only getting half or a third the data available.

    So, highlights are blown and shadows are muddied. Shoot RAW and learn to HDR your images when necessary. Or do as cookiedough says and use the blown highs and muddy lows to tell the story.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by big0mike View Post
    Proper exposure?

    Just curious as to what the issue is. I'm sure we all know a camera can't get an infinite amount of data using any given light source. Something has to give and it's either blown highlights or muddy shadows.

    That's why when I'm shooting stuff that I may want to keep I shoot RAW. After the fact I can go back to the RAW image and get + or - 2 to 3 stops in the image and make an HDR blend either manually or with software.

    It's an extra step or two but it sounds like from your description the shot with blown highlights just can't be taken without losing detail in the highs or lows.
    It's all about learning how to use the features on the camera. All of my camera's took a lot of reading, youtubing, and messing around before I could get what I wanted. The auto feature never quite worked right either.

  34. #34
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    I thought my source was Galen Rowell (landscape photog), but couldn't find it right off. The other one I had bookmarked was the cambridgecolor which confirmed the 10- 14 stop range of the cam listed in your link.

    I follow the stuckincustoms blog for the HDR stuff, and like the results, but he also has superb composition. IMO, composition is king, whether you're using the iPhone or the DSLR. The interesting image captures the imagination, whether it has the dynamic range or not. The HDR may accentuate, but a boring image is still a boring image regardless of the dynamic range.

    Full disclosure, I'm a fan of the thepixelatedimage blog, kenrockwell's stuff and mikesee's blog, all of which talk story/feeling and not necessarily image technicals. So, for a true review of the camera's tech capabilities, it wouldn't be me. I'm just as happy seeing an iPhone hipstmatic app photo full of passion as I am a D700 24 1.4 image crystal clear. To me it's the story you're telling, not necessarily the tack sharp image you're posting. anthonys was my inspiration to carry, and maad's prose has pushed me to place more emphasis on the story. Some of my fav images came from my canon A710 because it was there, as opposed to my D40. Both of which are ages old in tech speak.

    This one speaks volumes to me due to my memories, and it was taken using my p&s. I know the A710's limitations, so I don't try to take something outside of it's abilities. Maybe that's my point, know your tool and it's limitations, and produce the best story, since that is what has memorable value. -

    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/VovgYiFlqMPl8rh_DawgpP20a5kE8J69sMbLzKCwmhg?feat=e mbedwebsite"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-OvHNneZ2J1s/Te7DxkEPwyI/AAAAAAAAEcs/SpokihARnIM/s800/2011moab-2.jpg" height="600" width="800" /></a>

    Pictures, regardless of how they are created and recreated, are intended to be looked at. This brings to the forefront not the technology of imaging, which of course is important, but rather what we might call the eyenology (seeing). Henri Carier-Bresson

  35. #35
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    potential other source of info, /sarc on/ not that we have have enough info already, /sarc off/

    http://forums.steves-digicams.com/ge...-our-eyes.html

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by cookiedough View Post
    ~ IMO, composition is king, whether you're using the iPhone or the DSLR.

    ~ The interesting image captures the imagination, whether it has the dynamic range or not.

    ~ The HDR may accentuate, but a boring image is still a boring image regardless of the dynamic range.

    ~ To me it's the story you're telling, not necessarily the tack sharp image you're posting.

    ~ Know your tool and it's limitations, and produce the best story, since that is what has memorable value.
    I highlighted the major points... Cliff notes if you will

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by big0mike View Post
    Proper exposure?

    Just curious as to what the issue is. I'm sure we all know a camera can't get an infinite amount of data using any given light source. Something has to give and it's either blown highlights or muddy shadows.

    That's why when I'm shooting stuff that I may want to keep I shoot RAW. After the fact I can go back to the RAW image and get + or - 2 to 3 stops in the image and make an HDR blend either manually or with software.

    It's an extra step or two but it sounds like from your description the shot with blown highlights just can't be taken without losing detail in the highs or lows.
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidandmelinda/5816312199/" title="IMG_4087 by Melinda and David, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5229/5816312199_aaeb5473ab_b.jpg" width="1024" height="683" alt="IMG_4087"></a>

    this is an example. It just is lacking that richness that my old Canon PowerShot 230SD had. The colors just don't pop as much. Now as you mentioned I have yet to shoot in RAW but I am also shooting shutter priority as I was playing with motion and action this day, but I just want it to seem more saturated with color.

    It also was a smoky day here so there was a lot of spectral action going on. I just got the camera, so I am still on the learning curve, but I also used to shoot with a print Canon SLR and this camera just seems more touchy. Later in the day I knocked down the exposure some and got this shot which is starting to feel more correct to me:

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidandmelinda/5816912082/" title="IMG_4100 by Melinda and David, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2152/5816912082_23952851eb_b.jpg" width="1024" height="683" alt="IMG_4100"></a>

    I know it is a tough shot with a dark dressed subject and high silica ground with almost no contrasting vegetation but it definitely feels right-er. I am open to all criticism and pointers and help anyone is willing to offer. DSLR is a big jump from point and shoot, especially when you are just riding ahead, and doing a quick prep to shoot vs. other forms of photography where you have a lot of time to set your composition and your settings.
    Try this: HTFU

  38. #38
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    ultimately, yeah. I like that, too much of my engineering brain playing in the original post. I need to ride with you sometime.

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    RC, I don't see anything wrong with either of those pictures EXPOSURE wise.

    In the first shot the only thing that looks even remotely blown is the reflection of the sun off the helmet. And that's not even something that I would strive to avoid.

    The second shot is very well exposed and even given the subjects dark shorts & shirt the whole thing is basically front-lit and perfectly exposed. If you wanted to pick hairs you could say the jersey is underexposed but it's got no direct sunlight on it so of course it won't be exposed like the rest of the image.

    You said, "The colors just don't pop as much" and "I just want it to seem more saturated with color." Neither of those are exposure issues. Seems to me you need to play with white balance a little but more importantly play with the "Color Matrix" (as it is on my 1D), Scenes, or other color modes or balances. Even older cameras have settings that can increase contrast and/or saturation.

    If you shoot in RAW you can control the colors and saturation in Photoshop if what you've shot isn't to your liking. Try taking your camera out and shooting with different white/color balance settings. But do it in RAW so if you don't like what you see you can change it. After a couple outings you'll likely find a combination you like and you can stop shooting RAW unless you think you'll need it.

  40. #40
    workin' it Administrator
    Reputation: rockcrusher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by big0mike View Post
    RC, I don't see anything wrong with either of those pictures EXPOSURE wise.

    In the first shot the only thing that looks even remotely blown is the reflection of the sun off the helmet. And that's not even something that I would strive to avoid.

    The second shot is very well exposed and even given the subjects dark shorts & shirt the whole thing is basically front-lit and perfectly exposed. If you wanted to pick hairs you could say the jersey is underexposed but it's got no direct sunlight on it so of course it won't be exposed like the rest of the image.

    You said, "The colors just don't pop as much" and "I just want it to seem more saturated with color." Neither of those are exposure issues. Seems to me you need to play with white balance a little but more importantly play with the "Color Matrix" (as it is on my 1D), Scenes, or other color modes or balances. Even older cameras have settings that can increase contrast and/or saturation.

    If you shoot in RAW you can control the colors and saturation in Photoshop if what you've shot isn't to your liking. Try taking your camera out and shooting with different white/color balance settings. But do it in RAW so if you don't like what you see you can change it. After a couple outings you'll likely find a combination you like and you can stop shooting RAW unless you think you'll need it.
    Cool thanks for the advice. I meant to put the camera in RAW format when I went out but ultimately forgot so I got what I got. I will look into white balance as obviously I have been barking up the wrong tree.

    In the other thread in passion I mentioned that I have been needling the MTBR admin to put in a Mountain Biking Photography forum here so we can discuss issues like this. Any interest in that here in this thread?
    Try this: HTFU

  41. #41
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    Yes, I'm very interested, and intrigued that it appears so many others share at least two of my passions - mountain biking and photography.

  42. #42
    parenting for gnarness
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    Quote Originally Posted by chollaball View Post
    put it inside your knee pads, you don't use em.
    wow! to whomever negative rep'd me for this post...DAYUM! seriously dude, context! I should be flooded with positive rep for such an accurate and timely slander on my best riding bud.

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