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  1. #1
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    photographer interested in a bike

    Im a landscape photographer in Cave Creek, Arizona. I hike alot of local trails and was thinking it would be really beneficial and fun. Im going to drop by some bike shops this weekend, but thought I would get some input here first. My dad has a little mountain bike in his garage, but he is 5' 8". Im 6' 1" and 170 and it seems little to me. What brands should I look at and would any bike suffice?

  2. #2
    Afric Pepperbird
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    Brands - other than avoiding department store crap - mean nothing. It's all about fit, first and foremost.

    What is your budget?

  3. #3
    Former Bike Wrench
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    If it comes from a real bike shop (not department store, not a sporting goods store) then your going to do well.

  4. #4
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    I'm a photo hobbyist getting more and more into it. I recently started getting into landscape and location photography after I had begun biking.
    Any brand of bike from a good bike shop should work but if you plan on carrying any of your photo equipment attached to the bike keep in mind that bigger wheels smooth the ride. I use cargo racks and bags for carrying my camera's and lenses and I have noticed more bounce reduction for the equipment in my cargo racks and bags on my 29er hard tail than in a full suspension 26 inch bike I tried. I couldn't afford a FS 29er.

    As a note I ride a Trek Marlin 29er with Topeak cargo rack and bags. I usually keep my camera (Canon Rebel XS for now) in the front bag for quick access and my others lens and flash equipment in padded cases in the cargo trunk on the back rack.


    My 29er and accessories by Firehand10k, on Flickr

  5. #5
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    My price range is between 500 and 700. Thats pretty convenient firehand. Would you trust it with $5,000 worth of equipment?

  6. #6
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    In that price your best bet will be to get a bike online as far as parts go you will get more bang for the buck. This is a very good bike in your price range you will need a large frame size.

    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...tom_comp08.htm

  7. #7
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    Check out the Giant Revel 0. Great bike for the price.
    -Nick

  8. #8
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    If you mean do I trust it to carry that $5000 worth of gear. YES that's easy. Do I trust it to protect it? That's up to me to pack correctly. Making sure everything is correctly padded and secured. I have carried computers and other shock sensitive equipment without damage many times. I only use those though when riding mostly road or light trails though. For my harder riding I use a utility belt setup with a camera holster and padded holders for my other parts and a backpack for the computers if i need them, so that I can absorb alot of the shock. My bike is a Trek Gary Fisher collection Marlin and its right in the middle of your price range. I love it for everything I want to do but I have upgraded it quite a bit.

    You really should go to your local bike shop and try out a few things to see what fits best and will meet your needs/wants. There are so many good ones everyone has an opinion what you should get but the best thing you can do is try out a few and see what works or at least get an idea the sizes you need and then look online of your prefer to order one.

    My camera holder and utility bag. I usually have a flash in the bag but didn't need it today so I had a bike lock and snacks in that bag. My other lens is behind me more.


    IMG_8029 by Firehand10k, on Flickr

  9. #9
    rjx
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidl26
    My price range is between 500 and 700. Thats pretty convenient firehand. Would you trust it with $5,000 worth of equipment?
    I too am a photographer looking for a new bike at around $500-$600. I am going to repeat what I read earlier in another thread... In our price range the Diamondback Overdrive 29er seems like an excellent value due to it's components.

    http://www.mtbr.com/cat/bikes/29er/d...1_1548crx.aspx

    I would like to recommend the camera backpack I use, a Think Tank Street Walker Pro. It's a great,well built, sturdy bag. All of Think Tank's bags are high quality. Compared to Lowpro, there is no contest as far as quality is concerned. I would carry my gripped 40D + 4-5 lens + accessories + a Manfrotto 055XPROB hanging off the back of the bag. So I was carrying a lot of weight and that bag works wonderfully. Just thought I would mention what I use in case you are interested in a sturdy photographic backpack.

    BTW here is a video of the Streetwalker Pro
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZjvoMbhOEw

  10. #10
    My other ride is your mom
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    David.....check out craigslist here in the valley and find someone more knowledgeable about bikes to show you the ropes and look out for your interest until you get up to speed. I think you can find something on the high end of what you are looking for with a bit of patience. Right now, there are two Hi-Fi's within that price range.

  11. #11
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    Here is my setup for wildlife photography:



    I use the electric hub when it is hot summer conditions and more than a 20 mile trip. I also have a normal rim laced to a HD White Inustries hub. The rear hub is a 9 speed internal Shimano.

  12. #12
    bay area CA
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    my advice is to try craigslist. for the price of a brand new piece of crap bike from a department store, you can get a nice used quality bike. other than that, brand preference is exactly that, all preference. read up a little bit and figure out what size you need, figure out the type of riding you will be doing, and learn which components are quality and which ones are crap. good luck!

  13. #13
    rider
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    I just picked up a Fuji Tahoe 4.0 29er that is in your price range from performance. I liked it more than the dback overdrive. Hit up the LBS and kick some tires. BTW, I am also a shooter.

  14. #14
    Look at the time!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duntov1967 View Post
    Here is my setup for wildlife photography:



    I use the electric hub when it is hot summer conditions and more than a 20 mile trip. I also have a normal rim laced to a HD White Inustries hub. The rear hub is a 9 speed internal Shimano.
    This is a very cool purpose built bike, and the best way I've seen to carry that sort of glass beyond 100 yards from the car park.

    Where do you use it?
    wanted: Cannondale Lefty w/ V-brake studs

  15. #15
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    I am a photographer and just use a Tenba Shootout Backpack to carry equipment in.
    Tenba Shootout Backpack, Medium (Silver/Black) 632-312 B&H Photo

    Chillicothe Ohio Wedding Photographer | Portrait & Senior Fashion Photography | Chillicothe, Oh
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails photographer interested in a bike-mygt.jpg  

    2014 Santa Cruz Tallboy LTc
    Trek Farley 8
    iDream Images

  16. #16
    saddlemeat
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    Get a simple rigid single speed unless you want to become a bike service person or support one. Put soft fat tires on it... then you can concentrate on capturing images.
    Making the smack track baby.

    A Useful Bear
    is a handy thing...

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    Get a simple rigid single speed unless you want to become a bike service person or support one. Put soft fat tires on it... then you can concentrate on capturing images.
    So a single speed is the best choice because you won't have to adjust a derailleur once a year? LOL Do you oil the chain?

    Not everyone rides in the cool mountain air with 80 lbs. of cargo, especially on a single speed.

  18. #18
    saddlemeat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duntov1967 View Post
    So a single speed is the best choice because you won't have to adjust a derailleur once a year? LOL Do you oil the chain?

    Not everyone rides in the cool mountain air with 80 lbs. of cargo, especially on a single speed.
    I was speaking metaphorically... but no, I don't oil my chain, I lube it.

    I would make the same recommendation to a hunter or other recreationalist who wanted transportation but wasn't a biker. They would be better off just pushing the bike if things get difficult than getting all sweated up in hunting clothes.

    I assume your 80 lbs of cargo is metaphorical too unless you're carrying a Fairchild K-3 or something.
    Making the smack track baby.

    A Useful Bear
    is a handy thing...

  19. #19
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    As a professional photographer and very amateur mountain biker looking to combine the two, I'm about to order a Surly Ogre frame. It's a steel, rigid 29er and you can rack it to your heart's content. One of the few bikes that you can have racks front and back, a trailer, fenders, and disc brakes. I'm buying the frame and setting it up as a single speed.

    I think the two most important things you should look at are fit and the ability to put racks and panniers on it. I think a backpack like the ThinkTank Street Walker someone mentioned above, loaded with gear (especially something heavy like a 300 or 400/2.8) would feel awkward.

    Duntov1967 has a pretty good setup up there, and you could find a solid used hardtail for $500 and use the rest toward racks etc.

  20. #20
    saddlemeat
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    BigTex- What a great frame choice... I love my Karate Monkey and the Ogre is even more versatile.
    Making the smack track baby.

    A Useful Bear
    is a handy thing...

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    I assume your 80 lbs of cargo is metaphorical too unless you're carrying a Fairchild K-3 or something.
    No, I wasn't talking metaphorically. An aerial K-3 camera is akin to a point and shoot compared to just some of the lenses I use. I have glass up to 1600mm but my heaviest is this vintage Minolta 100cm.



    But sometimes I go simple and use an 8x10 camera.

  22. #22
    saddlemeat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duntov1967 View Post
    No, I wasn't talking metaphorically. An aerial K-3 camera is akin to a point and shoot compared to just some of the lenses I use. I have glass up to 1600mm but my heaviest is this vintage Minolta 100cm.



    But sometimes I go simple and use an 8x10 camera.
    Wow, awesome Duntov!

    What do you shoot with those huge lenses?
    Making the smack track baby.

    A Useful Bear
    is a handy thing...

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    What do you shoot with those huge lenses?
    Critters! It really is rare that I use the big ones. I use them primarily for shooting wildlife from across water bodies or up on cliffs and with my old film cameras. If I can, I prefer my 70-200mm f2.8 with a 1.7 converter. With a 1.6 sensor, the focal length is quite adequate. The really big lenses, especially the mirrors don't give me the best images.


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