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  1. #1
    @adelorenzo
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    Panning shots - motion blur

    Got this shot last night, first decent one I've done so pretty stoked. Took Seb Rogers' advice from the DP Review article and shot 1/60s shutter priority, in some pretty low light conditions.

    Only got a chance to try a couple shots last night but can't wait to try to get something better.

    Would love to see other people's shots and any other tips!

    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/w87CGgrfPshTsxu1_lbIfV6rw-2e4RCrv3XsPc5gHgc?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-Mur9PrLs9mg/TnwjR8N3nTI/AAAAAAAAAeE/WB4UTSf6O2A/s800/P1010008.JPG" height="599" width="800" /></a>

  2. #2
    Wzl
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    That link was great! Thanks for the info. I've tried but never succeeded in getting any shots worth showing but with this new info from the link above I am motivated to try again. Cheers.
    Ride hard. Ride often.

  3. #3
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    This is one of my favorites that I took.

    <img src="http://gtluke.smugmug.com/photos/915577522_zzLTQ-X2.jpg" width="800" height="533">

    and another

    <img src="http://gtluke.smugmug.com/photos/i-3D6MKXj/1/X2/i-3D6MKXj-X2.jpg" width="800" height="533">

  4. #4
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    The best way to get good at panning is practice. Also, if your camera or lens has image stabilization, learn how to use it.

    Using a flash, as in the examples above, can add another dimension, but it also robs some of the impression of motion, because you lose the rotation of the wheels. But it can be a very effective tool.

    Hmm... wish I could get the examples i was trying to post, to appear!
    Last edited by BigTex91; 09-30-2011 at 12:21 PM. Reason: no photos

  5. #5
    @adelorenzo
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    @gtluke Nice! That first shot is killer!

  6. #6
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    Thanks
    I suggest turning off image stabilization unless you have a long duration to pan the subject. In Jersey it's all forest, so I rarely have time to get a pan going long enough for the VR to work right. I normally just flick my wrist as the rider pops out behind a tree before he vanishes behind the next. It may have been used in that top one, I was experimenting that day. But it was on a rare occasion where I had a lot of room.
    I also find that 3D tracking isn't fast enough, use single point and aim for the face.


  7. #7
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    Do you go single point AF or manual focus? I've heard both ways. Your shots seem to indicate you have an idea of what you're doing.

  8. #8
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    Single point AF, I can't imagine how much training I would have to do to be able to do that in manual focus.

  9. #9
    bi-winning
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    Fort William World Cup DH Practice



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    Taken with a Canon SD1200IS point and shoot.
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  10. #10
    @adelorenzo
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    Tried some more shots today, this was the best I got:


  11. #11
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    these are the best ive gotten so far.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Panning shots - motion blur-rob-motiton-blur.jpg  

    Panning shots - motion blur-rob-motion-blur-2.jpg  

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  12. #12
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    The panning is good, see if you can get lower and further ahead so you can get more of their faces.

  13. #13
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    Here is one I took when I was in Galveston, TX.

    "Commuter bike" and "road bike"
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Panning shots - motion blur-harley-2.jpg  

    Panning shots - motion blur-suzuki.jpg  


  14. #14
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    got some more good ones today at our short track race

    <img src="http://gtluke.smugmug.com/Biking/20111009-Bagels-Bacon-Short/2011-Bagels-and-Bacon/i-Sqjzbds/0/X2/DSC7529-X2.jpg" width="800" height="533">

  15. #15
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    <img src="http://gtluke.smugmug.com/Biking/20111009-Bagels-Bacon-Short/2011-Bagels-and-Bacon/i-t2Gmqk7/0/X2/DSC7718-X2.jpg" width="800" height="533">

  16. #16
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    This one turned out cool. It helped that the sun was hitting him in the sweet spot.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Panning shots - motion blur-img_7394-copy-2-.jpg  


  17. #17
    Crazed Country Rebel
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    Quote Originally Posted by Empty_Beer View Post
    This one turned out cool. It helped that the sun was hitting him in the sweet spot.
    here's a couple.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Panning shots - motion blur-12649_1294349799380_1249355418_876700_1528806_n.jpg  

    Panning shots - motion blur-n1249355418_225882_2127.jpg  

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  18. #18
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    2006-2007?


    2011


    2011

  19. #19
    tg
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    No sure how my buddy does this I just ride bikes.....pretty cool shot I think.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Panning shots - motion blur-screen-shot-2011-12-05-7.23.45-pm.jpg  


  20. #20
    bi-winning
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    Quote Originally Posted by tg View Post
    No sure how my buddy does this I just ride bikes.....pretty cool shot I think.
    That's the exact opposite of every shot in this thread.
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  21. #21
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    Not panning but they have motion blur.




  22. #22
    ronbo613
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    Using a flash on motion blurs is kind of cheating so here is an all natural shot:



    Panning comes in handy when there is not enough light for a fast shutter speed(in case you didn't know that already)

  23. #23
    Life is Go0d!
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    A few randoms from last year

    Panning shots - motion blur-devilsden026.jpg

    Panning shots - motion blur-funstuff.jpg

    Panning shots - motion blur-devilsden016.jpg

    Panning shots - motion blur-april2010166.jpg
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  24. #24
    bi-winning
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    Quote Originally Posted by mo0se View Post
    A few randoms from last year
    Very nice.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkj__ View Post
    Very nice.
    Thanks!
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  26. #26
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    A couple from Raystown Lake.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak greeff View Post
    these are the best ive gotten so far.


    WTF? I don't understand. What's with the wheels? I mean it's clearly not keeping him from rocking his Mojo. But, why? $hit$ and giggles?

    Back to our originally scheduled broadcast. Nice shots everyone!

  28. #28
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    My only decent blurred shot this year.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Panning shots - motion blur-dsc_0024.jpg  


  29. #29
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    what would be a good camera for this type of photography

  30. #30
    Look at the time!
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajdonner View Post
    WTF? I don't understand. What's with the wheels? I mean it's clearly not keeping him from rocking his Mojo. But, why? $hit$ and giggles?
    Perfectly normal wheels. If you are referring to the apparent difference in size, I am willing to bet that this is merely a question of perspective (the back wheel is closer to the camera, which is why it appears to be larger).

    Here is another example, which also happens to be a bit of a panning shot:

    Cairns Smithfield DH3 - 14-08-2011 by lelebebbel, on Flickr

    what would be a good camera for this type of photography
    Any camera that allows you to manually set the shutter speed, which is pretty much any camera, except for the most basic entry level compacts or cell phone cameras.
    It helps if the camera is quick with little shutter delay and can take rapid fire image sequences while accurately tracking focus, but with enough practice, you can do this with any camera. The key word is practice.
    Last edited by lelebebbel; 01-10-2012 at 06:12 AM.
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    Forgot I had this. I think I had the camera for a day or two when I took this. Still learning a lot.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/jdeslauriers/6255939690/" title="DSC_0160 by Jason Deslauriers, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6037/6255939690_f7189fa7aa_z.jpg" width="640" height="424" alt="DSC_0160"></a>

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by lelebebbel View Post
    Perfectly normal wheels. If you are referring to the apparent difference in size, I am willing to bet that this is merely a question of perspective (the back wheel is closer to the camera, which is why it appears to be larger).
    Yep. I understand the effect that perspective has, especially at a close distance with an ultra-wide lens. I've held fish I caught at arms length when getting my picture taken. It just didn't look to me like this was the case given the apparent distance and position of the bike frame and rider. I thought it was funny looking and wanted to get the skinny! Perhaps, 'WTF?', set the wrong tone to my post...

  33. #33
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    Deleted... Wrong thread
    Quote Originally Posted by William Blake
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  34. #34
    csf
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    some nice shots in here guys.

    here's what I've found helps:

      1. usually 1/8s will give a nice blur and if done right the main subject will be adequately sharp
      2. to really blur the bg use a small f stop like f4 or smaller if light conditions allow.
    1. using flash will help stop the action and create a sharper image and gives a different look than without.
    2. it really helps to set these shots up in advance so you can find the location ahead of time where you want to take the shot. that way you can start tracking well ahead of that location and get a nice smooth panning motion
    3. while holding the camera, keep your elbows in tight and follow through with the panning, i.e. don't stop panning once you snap the shutter.
    4. as for focusing, you can either use manual and have your focal distance already set or use your auto focus tracking mode to stay locked on target.
    5. practice practice practice!

  35. #35
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    When I first tried panning I thought I needed my shutter at 1/30th for maximum background blur. I found I got that but it was tough to get the rider in "perfect" focus (first pic). Then I started shooting at 1/60th. Background not so blurred but a higher hit rate for biker in focus. Then I started shooting at 1/100th and higher because what I ultimately decided I wanted was biker in perfect focus, a higher hit rate, and just a bit of background blur (second pic which was shot at 1/640th). If these pics don't load in order, well you know what I'm talking about.

    It's a combination of how smooth your panning skilz are, how far you are away from your subject, shutter speed and ultimately what you're going for and how necessary it is to get the shot the first time.
    Last edited by xcguy; 06-20-2012 at 04:58 AM.
    So it seems to me to be, this thing that I think I see.

  36. #36
    Look at the time!
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    It depends on what you want to achieve with the blur. If you have a busy background that you want to get rid of, you'll need a slower shutter speed. If you want items in the background to be recognisable, and just use the blur to imply motion, a faster speed will do.

    Hit rates will be lower at slower speeds, image stabilization and camera support can really improve that though. Use a monopod. If you don't have one, use one of those cheap tripods and just extend one leg.
    And again, practice. You need to track the subject perfectly in a smooth motion - not only to avoid motion blurring the subject, but also to keep the autofocus sensor on target and allow the camera to track focus.

    Shooting race cars is great for practice
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    I was up on a stump, whipping that lens- come now...

  39. #39
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    Not panning? Well, not horizontally.

    We've seen lots of examples of horizontal panning -- but don't forget about vertical, rotational, vibrational and fore/aft panning -- in all these, you pan the camera along with your moving subject.

    This photographer demonstrates fore/aft panning and has kept near perfect pace with the subject -- resulting in that sweet spot of stillness relative to the subject, and movement relative to the surroundings... aka blur.

    Nice example Grandsalmon!



    Quote Originally Posted by Pernicious View Post
    Not panning.
    Quote Originally Posted by grandsalmon View Post

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  41. #41
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    These shots were taken on a full frame camera, manual focus preset on an area the rider will be going through, shutter priority with good depth of field at around f11 to keep the area you are panning on in focus. Focal length 72 - 83mm.

    The closer you are to the moving object the more motion blur you will achieve at the same shutter speed

    focal length 83mm, iso400, 1/125sec, f10


    focal length 83mm, iso400, 1/80sec, f11


    focal length 72mm, iso400, 1/80sec, f11
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  42. #42
    @adelorenzo
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    Got a few good ones this week:


    Rory by Anthony DeLorenzo, on Flickr


    Rory blur by Anthony DeLorenzo, on Flickr

  43. #43
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    @gtluke Those are some awesome shots. Nice and crisp on the subject!

  44. #44
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    ^ a bit too slow on the shutter. To go reaaaaally slow, the only way to freeze action is to use a flash.

  45. #45
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    Here's a couple I shot that worked out. I was having trouble getting the right shutter speed to freeze the motion while bluring the background, but sometimes that's not all bad either. It gives it a little more of an abstract feel.



  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by lelebebbel View Post
    And again, practice. You need to track the subject perfectly in a smooth motion - not only to avoid motion blurring the subject, but also to keep the autofocus sensor on target and allow the camera to track focus.
    ]
    Well, the bolded part isn't really true. As far as I know there is no camera that can autofocus while taking an exposure...SLR cameras certainly can't as the mirror is folded up so there's no way to even use phase detection AF, and contrast detection AF doens't have the same tracking capability as phase detection because contrast detection doesn't tell whether the subject is moving towards or away from the camera.

    I suppose the only type of camera that could be made to do this are the Sony SLTs, since they always have phase detection AF even if they're taking an exposure. But I don't think they actually do this (during video they do, however).

    I don't really know why you'd need to change focus during an exposure though. The subject isn't usually moving enough to move out of the plane of sharp focus, and I guess if they do, you can stop down. It would make the panning shot look weird though, because the subject would be changing in apparent size.

    Maybe you're referring to taking a burst of exposures and having the camera focus in between each.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kanik View Post
    Well, the bolded part isn't really true. As far as I know there is no camera that can autofocus while taking an exposure...SLR cameras certainly can't as the mirror is folded up so there's no way to even use phase detection AF, and contrast detection AF doens't have the same tracking capability as phase detection because contrast detection doesn't tell whether the subject is moving towards or away from the camera.

    I suppose the only type of camera that could be made to do this are the Sony SLTs, since they always have phase detection AF even if they're taking an exposure. But I don't think they actually do this (during video they do, however).

    I don't really know why you'd need to change focus during an exposure though. The subject isn't usually moving enough to move out of the plane of sharp focus, and I guess if they do, you can stop down. It would make the panning shot look weird though, because the subject would be changing in apparent size.

    Maybe you're referring to taking a burst of exposures and having the camera focus in between each.
    Hes actually dead on

    I know my d700 gripped firing at 8fps tracks focus like a champ on moving subects either acrosst the image or coming to you. It predicts where the next point will be in focus, ive gotta admit its pretty damn dead on almost all the time...if i shoot till i fill my buffer i might have 1 out of the 24 raw images where it missed focus but regains it in the next shot.


    Straight off Nikons website

    "An invaluable feature for sports, action and wildlife photography, 3D focus tracking, available in select Nikon D-SLRs, automatically shifts the focus point to follow the movement of the subject. With the shutter release pressed halfway, you'll see in the viewfinder the lens continuously maintain focus as the subject moves.

    However, maintaining focus doesn't guarantee a sharp image, as there is a short time lag between the release of the shutter and the capture of the picture. To solve this problem, the focus tracking system is a predictive system that uses special algorithms to forecast the position of the subject at the moment the image is captured. The prediction is based on a measurement of the subject's movement and speed.

    Simple predictive tracking is very effective for pictures of a subject moving at constant speed toward the camera, but to provide maximum focusing performance for a subject that abruptly changes direction at high speed, or a subject with low contrast, moving randomly, the AF system must accumulate subject location data using multiple focus areas. The AF modules built into selected Nikon D-SLRs have as many as 51 focus areas that can detect vertical, horizontal and diagonal movement of the subject.

    To realize high-precision AF for high-speed continuous shooting of a fast-moving subject, the processing speed of the AF cycle is vital. To provide that speed, a Nikon proprietary technology called overlap servo prepares for the focus detection of the next shot while the lens-driving operation for the current shot is in process."
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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by lax30 View Post
    Hes actually dead on

    I know my d700 gripped firing at 8fps tracks focus like a champ on moving subects either acrosst the image or coming to you. It predicts where the next point will be in focus, ive gotta admit its pretty damn dead on almost all the time...if i shoot till i fill my buffer i might have 1 out of the 24 raw images where it missed focus but regains it in the next shot.


    Straight off Nikons website

    "An invaluable feature for sports, action and wildlife photography, 3D focus tracking, available in select Nikon D-SLRs, automatically shifts the focus point to follow the movement of the subject. With the shutter release pressed halfway, you'll see in the viewfinder the lens continuously maintain focus as the subject moves.

    However, maintaining focus doesn't guarantee a sharp image, as there is a short time lag between the release of the shutter and the capture of the picture. To solve this problem, the focus tracking system is a predictive system that uses special algorithms to forecast the position of the subject at the moment the image is captured. The prediction is based on a measurement of the subject's movement and speed.

    Simple predictive tracking is very effective for pictures of a subject moving at constant speed toward the camera, but to provide maximum focusing performance for a subject that abruptly changes direction at high speed, or a subject with low contrast, moving randomly, the AF system must accumulate subject location data using multiple focus areas. The AF modules built into selected Nikon D-SLRs have as many as 51 focus areas that can detect vertical, horizontal and diagonal movement of the subject.

    To realize high-precision AF for high-speed continuous shooting of a fast-moving subject, the processing speed of the AF cycle is vital. To provide that speed, a Nikon proprietary technology called overlap servo prepares for the focus detection of the next shot while the lens-driving operation for the current shot is in process."
    Yeah, 3D tracking is pretty neat. I never use it on my D90 though because it only has 11 AF points, with only the center being cross type, so 3D tracking tends to hunt and not work very well. I bet it works loads better on the D700. I think it's cool how they use the color meter to tell the AF system where to focus. DSLRs fascinate me.

    I didn't know it would keep adjusting focus a little as the mirror flips up, but what I was trying to say is by then it's just guessing. But it still doesn't actually change focus when the shutter is open, right? But responding to the original tip given, yeah, it is going to focus faster if the subject comes up right where it used to be once the mirror flips down again.

    It would be interesting to see what happens if you took a fairly long exposure and changed focus during the exposure by turning the ring. I've never actually done that.

  49. #49
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    Ill play!





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    Lovin the blur! Keep em coming!

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