Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    I <3 NM
    Reputation: MTBNate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    3,063

    Nikon D7100 - too much camera?

    I can pick up a new D7100 for $1100 but am wondering if taking it along on rides would be more hassle than it's worth. Anyone use one and is it a pain to ride with?
    "Someone must have put alcohol in my beer last night." ~ Mr. Richard Baty, Esq.


  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ibadfish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    142
    This is a great bag for carrying camera equipment and other gear, also has a compartment for a hydration pack. I carry a 7d a flash and all my biking gear when I use it.
    Photo Sport 200 AW Camera bags, backpacks and rolling cases
    "The impossible often has a kind of integrity which the merely improbable lacks."
    -Douglas Adams

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    72
    Depends how dedicated you are and how accommodating your riding crew is. I used my Canon 40D a few times riding and snowboarding. Some things to consider, the size and weight. Can you handle riding with it. Deploying and setting up for a shot can take time. You'll need to tell your friends to wait while you ride ahead and get ready. That Lowepro pack look pretty interesting with its side access. I have a Dakine with back panel access that worked pretty fast too. Leave waist strap on, slip off shoulder straps, swing pack around to front of body, unzip panel, grab camera, shoot.
    I've since stopped carrying the DSLR, I am getting too old and lugging the weight around is no fun. I switched to micro 4/3's and a Canon Powershot D10. The D10 is in a pouch on the front of shoulder strap so I can actually deploy it with one hand while still riding and snap pics. The m4/3 I have to stop and deploy out of pack like the DSLR, but its much smaller. Quality isn't as good and success rate lower because of its speed, that's the sacrifice for the weight and size saving.
    My Nikon 1 AW 1 just arrived and its a little bigger than my m4/3, but its ruggedized so I can use it in conditions like the PS D10. The quality of images will be a little less than m4/3, but I'm hoping the AF speed and frame rate will make it better to use than my m4/3.

  4. #4
    I <3 NM
    Reputation: MTBNate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    3,063
    I carry a large camel pak mule with 2-3 beers usually. I think I can manage a camera.. maybe. Might have to carry 1 beer..
    "Someone must have put alcohol in my beer last night." ~ Mr. Richard Baty, Esq.


  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    59
    I have both a D90 and D7100. The quality of the 90 is right there short of some low light situations. I would go with the 90 and invest in better glass with he savings. I picked up a used 18-200 on ebay and it is like new, just a 1/3 the price.
    More to your point, riding with it, I only notice when I duck under low branches and the extra bulk makes contact. The weight is not that noticeable as it is a light body. If your worried about weight look at smaller rigs light the Cannon G11,12,13.

  6. #6
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    2,491
    Usually more hassle than it's worth, unlike the beer.
    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  7. #7
    MTB B'dos
    Reputation: LyNx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    17,604
    Spot, frikin, ON. I have one of those packs and it works excellent, but it will add some serious weight, so you have to decide if that's worth it. I got mine because I used to make my living taking pics and wanted to start back taking nature/scenery off the beaten path where my bike can take me and also on occasion on rides if the people ride will cooperate to get nice pics. Mine's fairly heavy when loaded with D7000/18-105 & Flash, 3 liters of water, shock pump, tyre pump, spare parts, snacks, Leatherman, GoPro, attached a pic of me riding with it - FYI 6'2" on an XL Prime to give an idea of how big it is.

    Only complaint on it is it needs some sort of crotch/leg strap so it doesn't fly up in the air off your back and lift you if you hit jumps - quite the unsettling feeling to have a pack that heavy lift you up and forward
    Quote Originally Posted by ibadfish View Post
    This is a great bag for carrying camera equipment and other gear, also has a compartment for a hydration pack. I carry a 7d a flash and all my biking gear when I use it.
    Photo Sport 200 AW Camera bags, backpacks and rolling cases
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Nikon D7100 - too much camera?-dsc_5756.jpg  

    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
    MTB Barbados
    My Phantom pics

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    72
    Yup, my feeling is that I don't get paid for this, I'm not hauling all this stuff around anymore, unless its a dedicated shoot day. Carrying my first gen rebel DSLR was actually not bad, plastic body light, may not feel as solid, but actually quite rugged, and pics come out great with good glass. That's why for a while the SL1 interested me.

  9. #9
    I <3 NM
    Reputation: MTBNate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    3,063
    Maybe a Nikon COOLPIX A would be the way to go?
    "Someone must have put alcohol in my beer last night." ~ Mr. Richard Baty, Esq.


  10. #10
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    2,491
    Quote Originally Posted by MTBNate View Post
    Maybe a Nikon COOLPIX A would be the way to go?
    Very interesting, you may be right. I love the external viewfinder, at least until I saw the price. Some other pricey accessories... holy shades of leica, batman! I think you should try it.

    For those who don't know, Coolpix was the original Nikon name for it's digital cameras. The Coolpix 950 was the first practical digital camera capable of competing with film for media use. There were earlier digital cameras but they all had serious limitations. I still use my 3.2 mp Coolpix 995 occasionally, it has an image quality that I find very appealing. The swivel body and screw on accessory lenses gave it capabilities that rival anything available now. My sensor is still functionally clean after 12 years and a lot of rough dusty miles later and the camera works as good as the day I bought it.
    Attached Images Attached Images    
    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    59
    nice and light but moving parts (body pivot) offer dust access.

  12. #12
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    2,491
    Quote Originally Posted by Scubae View Post
    nice and light but moving parts (body pivot) offer dust access.
    It's not the body pivot that lets dust in in a camera, it's the lens pumping air and dust when it zooms out and in. A camera that has a lens that extends from the body when zooming is a dust pump. In the case of the two decade old cameras above, which aren't light or small by today's standards, the lens zooms within the body so virtually no dust gets in. Modern rugged/waterproof p&s cameras zoom within the body also.
    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    59
    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    It's not the body pivot that lets dust in in a camera, it's the lens pumping air and dust when it zooms out and in. A camera that has a lens that extends from the body when zooming is a dust pump. In the case of the two decade old cameras above, which aren't light or small by today's standards, the lens zooms within the body so virtually no dust gets in. Modern rugged/waterproof p&s cameras zoom within the body also.
    Though I understand what you are saying I have had one of these apart for a friend and there was quite a bit of dust intrusion at the pivot. We had used it on a Motorcross trek.
    I agree the there is a "pumping effect" when "zooming" the camera is generally only exposed to dust when riding. When shooting things are generally a bit calmer and the dust ingestion issue is not so bad.
    I have been riding with a D90 and 18-200 lens both mountain and Moto for a few years and the last time I went through the lens it was clean. Same for the body. That said, if I were starting from scratch, just due to bulk and quality i would go large sensor compact like a G12. Or,as you mention, any number of the water"proof" P&S jobs available now. Great info either way.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    7
    Have you looked at a D5100? Nearly half the price and the pictures would rival and BIG $ camera (unless you get paid for your pics). We love ours...

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vicrider222's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    37
    If you're a photographer first, mtn biker second, then nothing wrong with lugging around a D7100. If you're a rider first, photographer second, I'd say it's too much.

    I have the Camelbak Mule NV which I consider to be a mid sized pack. I can barely fit my "naked" D5100 + 35mm 1.8 lens, with a 1in thick strip of equipment foam to protect it from the rear. This lens is small. Any other lens like a kit zoom makes it impossible to pack safely. D7100 will be much larger than that.

    I second the Coolpix A suggestion, although I have gone with its competitor - Ricoh GR. The camera is bloody brilliant. Just used it on a 2week mountain biking trip where we rode for 10 days in a row and I'm in love with it. Sensor size is the same as in the D7100, no low pass filter, the lens is first grade, pictures are amazingly sharp. It puts my D5100 with the 35mm f1.8 to shame. The lens on the GR is 28mm equivalent which in my opinion is THE focal length for general photography on the trails. Anything with longer focal length will cause issues with framing in tight spots on the trail. And it's the perfect focal length for landscape if you want to take in more scenery.

    I carry it in the Lowe Pro Santiago DV 35 hard shell pouch with a bit of foam padding, and I chuck the pouch inside the camel back. I'm working on a chest mount for the pouch for quick access because my riding buddies don't have much patience for photography and I don't like being left behind.

  16. #16
    psycho cyclo addict
    Reputation: edubfromktown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1,954
    Some of the serious amateur photographers I know are dumping their Nikon D90's, 7000's, etc. in favor of the lighter/mirrorless Olympus system. Amazon is offering $150 rebate on a lot of them right now.

    I am quite content with my D5000 and an SB-600 flash. I use a chest strap and carry it in a Lowepro padded case on some MTB rides (I bring the 55-200 lens most often). An iPhone 5s is generally what I use otherwise...

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    259
    Agree with vicrider222.

    I've got a D5000 that I ride with in my Camelbak Blowfish occasionally. I usually only take a single lens on any given ride. The camera and lens (everything from Nikon 50mm, 18-200 VRII or Tokina 11-16) and full 100 oz. bladder fit fine and the weight, while noticeable, isn't too bad. That said, I don't take my DSLR out unless I know photography is a focus of the ride.
    For all other rides I've got a Canon S110 (had the S95, sold it, then got the S110 cuz I missed the s95) that fits in a LowePro pouch on my shoulder strap. Super convenient, manual control if desired and decent pics.

Similar Threads

  1. Review - Nikon's New D7100 DSLR
    By Photo-John in forum Photography for mountain bikers
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-01-2014, 09:32 AM
  2. Nikon 1 AW1?
    By pixelninja in forum Photography for mountain bikers
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 01-26-2014, 11:19 PM
  3. I just went for the Nikon 1
    By francois in forum Photography for mountain bikers
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11-18-2013, 03:24 PM
  4. new nikon d3200 $700
    By bob13bob in forum Photography for mountain bikers
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-23-2012, 01:43 PM
  5. Looking at a Nikon D5100
    By Metamorphic in forum Photography for mountain bikers
    Replies: 52
    Last Post: 04-22-2012, 05:11 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •