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  1. #26
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    I use one of these for snowboarding....

    Dakine Europe Packs : Mission Photo 25L

    Have yet to take it out biking but I should be more than sufficient. Just have to be selective with what equipment I take as it's very easy to overload this pack with lenses, flashes and other gear as there is so much space!

  2. #27
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    i grabbed one of these on their last kickstarter deal and got the leash strap as well. It was a little pricey i suppose but man does it work. I was skeptical but it worked great. so much easier than fishing it out of my bag. I did however pick up so insurance for my camera before heading out. but it is very secure and works as advertised. I like how you can lock it down for extra peace of mind.


    edit: camera was Nikon d7000 with 18-200 lens so not exactly an ultralight setup
    Last edited by BigE610; 01-10-2013 at 02:40 PM.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by hogprint View Post
    I picked up a Capture Camera Clip the other day. Took it out for a ride over the weekend and was pleasantly surprised by the unobtrusive nature of bringing along the SLR. In the past I have fashioned a case to clip on my chest using my hydration pack as the base. This gizmo attaches to one shoulder strap and is super secure. Of course the camera is out in the open so if you are always pushing your limits and biff on occasion this probably isn't for you but it was perfect for me as a way to bring the SLR out to play.

    The device was a successful kickstarter project. I bought mine through amazon. Very worth the money.

    Link to the product Kickstarter campaign

    Product web page
    My wife bought one of these, but the thumbscrew peice that is meant as a safety lock (in case you bump the release button) does not thread in far enough... did you experience this?
    EDIT: we love the product, sturdy and versatile. and she was one of the early kickstarter backers, so she got a first run... curious if this problem was solved so perhaps the guy who is behind it might send her a replacement thumb screw.

  4. #29
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    I use a Domke insert stuffed inside a Camelbak Alpine Explorer. The pack is big/stable enough to carry my dslr body (5d) with a 24-70 2.8 and battery grip attached, 2 other lenses and a speedlight. The outside of the pack can carry my small tripod (a carbon Sirui t25) if a bother to bring it. Aside from all the camera gear, there's still room for all my riding essentials - tools, spares, food, extra layers if needed, phone, and a 100oz. bladdar to boot.

    So far it's all worked out great if not a little heavy, but if I have everything with me, I'm likely doing more shooting than riding anyhow.

  5. #30
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    I have the Lowepro Fast Pack 200. It's freaking sweet. Holds a fair amount of gear in nice padded pouches and has some nice room up top for other stuff to keep you from having to pack multiple bags. Great for hiking/biking and just about any travel activity.



  6. #31
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    I just got a T4i! it fits with room to spare in my Ibera handlebar bag. I can stuff a lightweight jacket into the other half (there is a padded divider) along with some food and another lens. used it twice so far with no problems, I was able to get some nice shots as soon as I stopped my bike and reached into the bag.

  7. #32
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    which ibera bag?

    Quote Originally Posted by jenkibike View Post
    I just got a T4i! it fits with room to spare in my Ibera handlebar bag. I can stuff a lightweight jacket into the other half (there is a padded divider) along with some food and another lens. used it twice so far with no problems, I was able to get some nice shots as soon as I stopped my bike and reached into the bag.
    do you mean this one BikePakmart - Ibera Clip-On Bicycle Handlebar DSLR Camera Bag or this one BikePakmart - Bicycle Bag, Handlebar bag, Carrier bag, Camera bag ? this site has one more handlebar bag, but it looks too small for a DSLR.

  8. #33
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    I use a Photo Sport 200AW for my 5D Mark III with 16-35L and 70-300L fits a water bladder too in a separate compartment.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by hogprint View Post
    I picked up a Capture Camera Clip the other day. Took it out for a ride over the weekend and was pleasantly surprised by the unobtrusive nature of bringing along the SLR. In the past I have fashioned a case to clip on my chest using my hydration pack as the base. This gizmo attaches to one shoulder strap and is super secure. Of course the camera is out in the open so if you are always pushing your limits and biff on occasion this probably isn't for you but it was perfect for me as a way to bring the SLR out to play.

    The device was a successful kickstarter project. I bought mine through amazon. Very worth the money.

    Link to the product Kickstarter campaign

    Product web page
    Pardon my ignorance, but this is the worst idea I've seen for tail riding. Aren't trails....dusty, have water crossings? Why would you want your SLR exposed to those conditions?
    Don't get me wrong, I think it's a fantastic product, but absolutely the worst to bring out on a trail. I don't know about your're tyres but mine like to kick up dirt. What about the camera bumping/boucing off you, the trails I use are not smooth by any means.

  10. #35
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    Ive used peak designs for about 2 years. used it for mtb biking, horse rides & hiking and it works great.

    Easy one hand grab & shoot. I mount it to my shoulder strap

    https://peakdesignltd.com/capture/

  11. #36
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    Clik Elite has some great options. Contejour 35 or 40 are both great packs!

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishrising View Post
    The backpack is a F-Stop Loka.
    I'll second this recommendation. Great pack. I have the medium and small inserts for it. With the small, I can take a minimum amount of gear and have plenty of room for other stuff-like a jacket and some energy bars.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by eeyon View Post
    the Lowesport 200 AW is a pretty good biking, hiking, and snowboarding bag for one DLSR and two lenses. Comes with a space for a hydration pack and an additional general compartment to haul enough necessities for a day's outing.
    Great pack, poor straps, poor customer service. Mine started tearing. The chest strap, one of the belt straps, and one of the top compartment straps. I was told by lowepro to find a local seamstress to fix the straps. Wtf? The plastic clips that cinch down the straps and the cheap webbing are the cause. The clips are sharp, and the webbing is thin. I had a friend of mine who sews fix the belt strap, but the other two are sewn directly to the pack and she couldn't fix. After going back and forth with lowepro they agreed to have me send it back for inspection. Then they said it looked like it was exposed to chemicals. Again wtf? I keep it in my coat closet, and they were clear tears in the webbing. After going back and forth too many times, they agreed to fix it. Mind you I had only had this pack two months. When I received it they still didn't fix the belt strap. I ended up purchasing a piece of webbing to make it usable. Bottom line, cheap construction, and jerk you around customer service. Dear lowepro, don't offer lifetime warranties if you're going to make people jump through hoops to get anything done.

  14. #39
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    It's been a while since the original post and was wondering if anyone has feedback on the Capture clip after long term use? This idea seems intriguing and would probably work for most of my riding.

    After posting I noticed two posts up someone's been using it for two years, anyone have pictures of how you mount this while riding?
    Last edited by SoCalAl; 02-08-2013 at 06:38 AM.

  15. #40
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    Can you please tell me more about this standard size ? Will it hold just a dslr with the kit lens or wil a wide angle lens such as a 10-20 fit ? It seems I heard th diameter of some of the wide angle lens might me too large.

    Of more importance how is scooching behind the saddle with the thing strapped to chest ?

    Quote Originally Posted by SlowerThenSnot View Post
    been very happy with this so far! Standard SLR Chest Carrier

  16. #41
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    I'm not one to bring up old stuff very often, but I wanted to put a little info here. I picked up a Peak Designs Capture Clip after reading through this thread, because I thought it looked like it would work pretty well. And the short version is, it does. But I took a huge spill Saturday with my DSLR on the shoulder strap of my camel back. I was going into a switch back that I've ridden hundreds of times, my speed was good, everything was cool. And then both wheels of the bike where up in the air, the whole works was sideways, and I came crashing down, hard. It was like someone pulled a carpet on the trail out from under me and I was in some sort of cartoon. Even the guy behind me on the trail described it like that. My point is this - I came down in an uncontrolled fall on my left side/back, which is the side my camera was on. It didn't hit the ground though, it just landed on me. In face, the capture clip held it so well, it didn't even flip around enough in the impact with the ground to, say, hit me in the face or anything. I knew it was secure, and worked well, because I've ridden pretty hard with the camera clipped on, but I was impressed after the fall with how it held. Oh, and the camera is just fine. I am certain that if I'd had the camera in a back pack, that wouldn't be the case at all. So, there it is. I'm a very happy capture clip customer, and I'd highly recommend this delightful gadget to anyone.

  17. #42
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    I'm still thinking about picking one up but it seems like my setup would be way heavy to hang off a shoulder strap. What body and lens are you using?

  18. #43
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    Method for bringing the SLR on the trail

    Quote Originally Posted by Cotharyus View Post
    I'm not one to bring up old stuff very often, but I wanted to put a little info here. I picked up a Peak Designs Capture Clip after reading through this thread, because I thought it looked like it would work pretty well. And the short version is, it does. But I took a huge spill Saturday with my DSLR on the shoulder strap of my camel back. I was going into a switch back that I've ridden hundreds of times, my speed was good, everything was cool. And then both wheels of the bike where up in the air, the whole works was sideways, and I came crashing down, hard. It was like someone pulled a carpet on the trail out from under me and I was in some sort of cartoon. Even the guy behind me on the trail described it like that. My point is this - I came down in an uncontrolled fall on my left side/back, which is the side my camera was on. It didn't hit the ground though, it just landed on me. In face, the capture clip held it so well, it didn't even flip around enough in the impact with the ground to, say, hit me in the face or anything. I knew it was secure, and worked well, because I've ridden pretty hard with the camera clipped on, but I was impressed after the fall with how it held. Oh, and the camera is just fine. I am certain that if I'd had the camera in a back pack, that wouldn't be the case at all. So, there it is. I'm a very happy capture clip customer, and I'd highly recommend this delightful gadget to anyone.
    Great write up, I've been running the peak now for a couple of years. It's great. I haven't had any falls, but I'm sure glad the positioning helped in your crash.

  19. #44
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    I'm using a camera/lens combination I wouldn't be torn up about being wrecked if something bad did happen - my old Canon Rebel XT and either the Canon 50mm 1.8 the 18-55 kit lens that came with the T3i my wife shoots with - which may be worth more than my body, but still isn't a great or expensive lens. So it's not a very heavy setup, but I'm not certain I'd want a real heavy setup on a bike at all unless I was specifically riding somewhere to take pictures.

  20. #45
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    Method for bringing the SLR on the trail

    Quote Originally Posted by SoCalAl View Post
    I'm still thinking about picking one up but it seems like my setup would be way heavy to hang off a shoulder strap. What body and lens are you using?
    I run either a d90 or d7000 Nikon body. And 10-24mm lense or the 18-200mm. I mount it lens facing down on my front shoulder strap. It's comfortable, feels secure when riding and its easy to grab when I want it quickly.

    If I remember correctly the mount is like $75. It's made of aluminum and should last forever.

  21. #46
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    I carry my NEX 6 (with any lens I may have) in a Clik Elite Access chest bag. X-country skiing, snowshoeing and mountain biking. I have considered using a Peak Design Capture Clip on my Camelbak, but I always refrain because of potential fall, dust and dirt, rain, sweat.... With my chest bag, there is at least some minimal protection. I'm always looking for better ways to carry my camera that provide quick access and some protection.

    Johnnydrz

  22. #47
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    Keep your DSLR in a padded bag where it belongs. Having a $5000 camera and lens dangling from your waist while going down rocks is not a good idea.

    Quote Originally Posted by hogprint View Post
    I picked up a Capture Camera Clip the other day. Took it out for a ride over the weekend and was pleasantly surprised by the unobtrusive nature of bringing along the SLR. In the past I have fashioned a case to clip on my chest using my hydration pack as the base. This gizmo attaches to one shoulder strap and is super secure. Of course the camera is out in the open so if you are always pushing your limits and biff on occasion this probably isn't for you but it was perfect for me as a way to bring the SLR out to play.

    The device was a successful kickstarter project. I bought mine through amazon. Very worth the money.

    Link to the product Kickstarter campaign

    Product web page

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by CupOfJava View Post
    Keep your DSLR in a padded bag where it belongs. Having a $5000 camera and lens dangling from your waist while going down rocks is not a good idea.
    Couldn't agree more!

  24. #49
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    ^Yeah but a $750 dslr/kit lens on your camelpack strap might be a great idea. Going down rocks... meh.
    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    ^Yeah but a $750 dslr/kit lens on your camelpack strap might be a great idea. Going down rocks... meh.
    Slightly longer access time, but this would probably keep your camera safer, and better anchored to your person: Lowepro | Toploader Zoom? AW Series

    Also depends on ones riding style and the local terrain!

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