Results 1 to 98 of 98
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    316

    How to protect a DSLR on the trail ?

    Hi Everyone

    I have a high end camera that takes beautiful pics that I would love to take on my bike on the trails, but the idea of killing it in a crash is keeping me from doing that. My budget is tight right now and I couldn't replace it any time soon if i broke it. ( It's the only one I have. )

    If anyone has any budget or DIY solutions that would be great, if not whatever suggestions you have would be appreciated.


    Thanks,

    Ted
    I'd rather be riding than healing, body armor is your friend !

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    39
    I don't know myself, but have you asked in the Video & Helmet Cams section. From looking through that section before, there are some serious photo and video guys that might have some really good tips that may not see this post in the General Discussion. Just a suggestion.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    316
    Dude !

    I didn't even know there was such a forum.... Thanks
    I'd rather be riding than healing, body armor is your friend !

  4. #4
    Ride'n Dirty
    Reputation: Probie1Kenobi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    146
    If focal length factor is not an issue (with smaller CMOS's) then I would recommended going out and buying a comparable version of it in a cheap body that is disposable.

    For example, I shoot with a EOS 1DmkII. If I was going somewhere where I didnt want to risk it I would buy a EOS Rebel, body only. Loosing $500.00 is A Lot easier than loosing $5000.00.

    Of course you still have to protect your glass, I would look into Pelican Hard cases for those. Pelican Hard cases a lot of them are shock proof, water proof, ballistic cases.
    I HATE WORK, WORK IS BAD, WORK = NO BIKE, NO BIKE = NO GOOD.

  5. #5
    Bro
    Bro is offline
    Content from my avatar
    Reputation: Bro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    4,356
    I once took my school newspaper's camera up to the top of the mountain for some good shots. I just slung it across my shoulders and tightened the strap, it didn't move at all. Of course, I would never do that again, it's an expensive camera. I didn't even bring the case, just the camera. Don't tell anyone though.
    Sometimes, I question the value of my content.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    184
    You can get a 12 mega pix point and shoot camera ,with descent zoom capabilities. that is another option

  7. #7
    Five is right out
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    3,174
    A small foam-padded Pelican case would be a very safe solution, if your pack is big enough and you're willing to sacrifice ease of access.

  8. #8
    Never trust a fart
    Reputation: frdfandc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    4,049
    Leave it in your car, and pick up an inexpensive 10-12 mega pixel point and shoot. You can get one for around $100.

    I use an older camera like this for the trail. Its not like I'm doing portraits.

  9. #9
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3,405
    I just wonder if anyone has ever damaged a camera on the trail? I have, but in my case it fell out of my jersey pocket onto slickrock when I pulled something else out of the pocket. I still put my camera in my jersey pocket at times, or in my cargo shorts pocket, so that I have quick access to it. I also use a small seatpost bag at times for a P&S, sometimes a dslr in my Camelback. I don't think camera damage is a real big problem unless you drop it on rock, but you could always bolt a Pelican case to a rear rack (jk). Just start taking pictures and don't worry about the camera.
    I ride with the best dogs.




  10. #10
    dru
    dru is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,452
    About 15 years ago whe I was new to the sport and photography I flew down the side of an earthen dam with my Nikon FG in a fanny pack. I didn't see a whoop in the trail until I was on it and endoed at around 25 mph. The camera body was busted to hell and bruised the small of my back so badly that I was crawling around on the ground for a good ten minutes before I got up.

    Ouch!
    occasional cyclist

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    316
    Quote Originally Posted by dru
    About 15 years ago whe I was new to the sport and photography I flew down the side of an earthen dam with my Nikon FG in a fanny pack. I didn't see a whoop in the trail until I was on it and endoed at around 25 mph. The camera body was busted to hell and bruised the small of my back so badly that I was crawling around on the ground for a good ten minutes before I got up.

    Ouch!

    Yeah, I hear ya

    I am starting to think about going the cheap point and shoot route route instead.

    Or I may even go really cheap and get one of those keychain video cameras that you can tape to your helmet and then I would have video to watch after the ride
    I'd rather be riding than healing, body armor is your friend !

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: smmokan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    2,519
    I use a 50D, usually with my Canon 15-85mm lens attached... not a light setup by any means. When I take it riding with me, all I usually do is wrap it in a long-sleeved shirt and put it in my backpack. If I do ever fall (which, knock on wood, I haven't lately), I probably won't land on my back.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TheAntiSpoke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    91
    Quote Originally Posted by smmokan View Post
    I use a 50D, usually with my Canon 15-85mm lens attached...
    You either have a big wallet or a big sack, I have a 40D and I can't even imagine how sick I'd feel if I were to bust it on a mountain, but I bet you get great pics!

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jibmaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,135
    I have an Olympus SP-565UZ camera


    I carry it with my Clik chest pack


    Here are some Google images
    clik elite - Google Search

    And the official site
    Products | Clik Elite

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nikojan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    558
    I sold my d300s awhile ago but I had the national geographic NG-5737. Worked great.



    It isn't as big as it looks though. This one isn't cheap, something like 150 when I got it but it really is worth it, padded everything and it looks awesome. You might want to look for a used lowepro on craigslist, I'm sure you can find one with great padding for like $50 or even less.
    "Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of a bike ride." - John F. Kennedy

    Setup:
    11' Giant XTC 2 29er

  16. #16
    Cycling for Life
    Reputation: Ak_Dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    34
    Carry a 50D for shooting races myself, I have a Tamrac backpack that is camera specific and holds everything nice and tight, its not very cheap though. I have just recently picked up a slightly used Clik pack that I like better for half the price of the other one. Have also used a large waist pack with a home made foam insert before that worked pretty well.
    Check the larger/older camera stores as most of them will sell used gear or watch Craigslist, some good deals on there.

    Mounting a bag to the bike is never a good idea, the camera has to absorb all the vibration and bumps of the bike, even if itís a hard case. While in a pack on your back your legs and arms absorb all that.

  17. #17
    poser Administrator
    Reputation: rockcrusher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    9,062
    there is a clic bag available with a bladder, not sure what model it is but it is under their adventure line. It holds a standard body and larger lenses, with the camera accessible from an outside pocket.

    I think the best advice I have is to ride carefully. I keep my camera in a camelback hawg in the outside helmet holder but within a Lowe Camera bag. The hawg is reasonably cheap (especially on clear out or chainlove etc) compared to dedicated camera bags and I already have a lowe bag for storage at home. It makes it easily accessible but well restrained. My biggest concern with my camera is not some much the camera itself but impacting the ground such that it breaks my ribs or shoulder blades hence the ride carefully.

    I ride at around 75% when I carry my camera (T1i) instead of 95% like I would normally. I will walk any section that looks like it will cause a stall and slow way down on chop.

    Ultimately nothing will protect you camera in a big enough crash so try to avoid that situation.
    Try this: HTFU

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    52
    Buy a warranty. When I bought my camera I didn't even think about the warranty than the lady said these magic words "accident protection program" I immediately interrupted her and asked what that was. Basically if I drop it and it breaks I get a new one no questions asked. I even sat there for like 20mins reading the fine print so I could make sure that's what is all about, I was sold. Yeah it would suck for it to break but knowing that it would get repaired or replaced eases my mind when I bring it out for filming or pictures.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: smmokan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    2,519
    Quote Originally Posted by TheAntiSpoke View Post
    You either have a big wallet or a big sack, I have a 40D and I can't even imagine how sick I'd feel if I were to bust it on a mountain, but I bet you get great pics!
    Yeah, I don't take it out that frequently, but when I do I'm obviously very careful. I do the same thing when I'm skiing, except I put it into a small top-load bag first before putting that into my backpack.

    I guess I just try not to think about the consequences.

  20. #20
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5,878
    You could also get a nice little interchangeable lens contact camera, like the Olympus Pen or the Sony Nex... Great captor size and nice lens get you some awesome pics and even with high contrast of the forest with the low light created by the tree's shadow.

    Otherwise, I have a Nikon D7000 with a 18-105 and 70-300, but when I go fishing, biking or whatever, I bring my trusty Coolpix L18 that got me some of my most awesome aventure shots at 8Mp with 3x optic zoom and and nice 3 inch display and easy to operate... Back in 2008, it costed me $135 but now it's like the L24 can sell for less then $100, but I still prefer the L18 over the new ones (L20, L22, L24). And it's RED ! and chicks love cool guys with red cameras

    But if I could get someone to walk by me all day long to carry my D7000, I would use it crazy... Over super uber nice pics from Nikon, from their sensor too... Lesson is the only expensive thing allow on trails is your damn bike. Else are subject to normal wear and tear from anything the trail could throw at them.

    Happy riding

    David
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1
    I'll second this. I bought one when I finally got a real camera. Covers everything as long as the camera is not burned and you still have it (i.e. theft not covered). For a hundred bucks a year its well worth the piece of mind.

    Quote Originally Posted by savagenative View Post
    Buy a warranty. When I bought my camera I didn't even think about the warranty than the lady said these magic words "accident protection program" I immediately interrupted her and asked what that was. Basically if I drop it and it breaks I get a new one no questions asked.

  22. #22
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5,878
    Quote Originally Posted by savagenative View Post
    Buy a warranty. When I bought my camera I didn't even think about the warranty than the lady said these magic words "accident protection program" I immediately interrupted her and asked what that was. Basically if I drop it and it breaks I get a new one no questions asked.
    Is this warranty also available for my bike ?
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ecub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    457
    You can also get insurance on your gear. This will allow better coverage than a warranty.

    Although Pelican hardcases are great, they can become a PITA to carry on a bike on a trail. I prefer a backpack. I use a Crumpler Karachi Outpost myself, when I go to trails. But it's rather large. If you plan to bring your bike and camera bike on rain or shine, then look for a backpack with a raincover. Depending how much or how big your gear is, I would avoid doing any extreme DH or XC while on your back.
    - Ed

    2012 Trek Madone 6.7 SSL
    2013 Specialized Tricross Comp Disc
    2011 Trek Top Fuel 9.9 SSL
    2012 Salsa Mukluk 2

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nikojan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    558
    Quote Originally Posted by savagenative View Post
    Buy a warranty. When I bought my camera I didn't even think about the warranty than the lady said these magic words "accident protection program" I immediately interrupted her and asked what that was. Basically if I drop it and it breaks I get a new one no questions asked. I even sat there for like 20mins reading the fine print so I could make sure that's what is all about, I was sold. Yeah it would suck for it to break but knowing that it would get repaired or replaced eases my mind when I bring it out for filming or pictures.
    Its funny how it never turns out that way when it does happen. I had a friend who insured his new 300mm 2.8, dropped it where it started to make a noise everytime it zoomed in and out and the insurance wouldn't come through. Its a good backup but nothing beats a good sturdy bag and a cautious mentality
    "Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of a bike ride." - John F. Kennedy

    Setup:
    11' Giant XTC 2 29er

  25. #25
    Cycling for Life
    Reputation: Ak_Dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    34
    Here is a good review of the Clik bags-
    Review: Clik Elite Probody and Compact Sport MTB DSLR Photography Hydration Packs | Bike198

    I recently picked up the smaller one and love it. Filling it with a 50D, extra lens plus extras does fill it up though, if you like carrying more gear I would recomend the larger of the two.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    63
    knida dissapointed that no one has any real bag recommendations for carrying a DSLR. I'm looking to carry my 1D MKIII, a couple lenses, a couple flashes and a remote while riding singletrack and eedn some ideas on a backpack. Looked at Lowepro and Tamrac and neither makes a pack that is small enough to bike with that doesn't feel like I'm carrying a suitcase. Now looking at a Tenba Shootout small or a KATA Bumblebee 220. Would really appreciate any input.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    7
    I'd probably just put it in a snoot bag in my backpack, but then again I'd leave my good camera at home, it weighs a ton!

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    51
    Quote Originally Posted by sportster44 View Post
    knida dissapointed that no one has any real bag recommendations for carrying a DSLR. I'm looking to carry my 1D MKIII, a couple lenses, a couple flashes and a remote while riding singletrack and eedn some ideas on a backpack. Looked at Lowepro and Tamrac and neither makes a pack that is small enough to bike with that doesn't feel like I'm carrying a suitcase. Now looking at a Tenba Shootout small or a KATA Bumblebee 220. Would really appreciate any input.
    You can checkout f stop bags. They make some quality bags. However you are looking to carry quite a lot of gear so anything that can carry that much might feel bulky.

    The bag from Lowepro, Photo Sport Series AW Series, seems like the best option for the prices. Although may not be large enough for what you would like to carry.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: A1an's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,920
    I have a Kata 3n1 that is nicely padded for offroad duty. Comes with a rain fly as well. I only had a chance to take it out once last winter (the only time I can really shed the camelbak) but plan on going out more this winter.
    Signature

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    39

    Lowepro Camera Bags

    If anyone is still looking for a camera bag, The Clymb has Lowepro camera bags for sale on the site. You have to be a member, but they usually carry some pretty good stuff.

    The Clymb | The Gear You Need. Up to 70% Below Retail. ô

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    11
    Anyone used a go pro?

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    176
    I have on occasion taken my DSLR in my camelbak with me, and honestly I don't have any concerns with crashing and breaking it - I don't crash much, when I do I rarely land on my back, and I can also pretty easily dial back my riding if I'm concerned about it. No matter how careful you are, and how protected the camera is, however, there is another fundamental issue with carrying a big camera that prevents me from doing so 95% of the time - the time it takes to unpack the camera and shoot causes me to miss action shots or slows the pace of the ride significantly. For me, it is worth the limitations in terms of image quality, focal length, etc, to use a good point and shoot that I can keep in a small pouch attached to one of the shoulder straps on my Camelbak. Unless I'm going out for a dedicated photo shoot ride, this gets me a lot more and a lot better riding shots (as opposed to scenery). I use a Panasonic LX-3, which I have been really happy with for this purpose. It has good wide-angle capability, but is a little short on reach, but I find that actually makes it well suited to jumping off my bike, yanking out the camera and getting some shots off before the guy behind me comes through.

  33. #33
    Sandy Eggo
    Reputation: ablation's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    34
    Insurance

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    574
    Quote Originally Posted by ablation View Post
    Insurance
    +1

    State farm personal articles policy ~$150 per YEAR to cover $5000 worth of stuff against accidental damage, loss, theft, zombie attack, anything else.

  35. #35
    offroader
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    2,190

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    85
    ^ CupOfJava - What brand/model is that?

  37. #37
    offroader
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    2,190
    Clik elite pro body sport. The picture isn't mine, but my bag and setup looks identical to the one I posted.

  38. #38
    Look at the time!
    Reputation: lelebebbel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    1,138
    Quote Originally Posted by The Bokehnater View Post
    Too many folks think their DSLRs are like some precious jewelry.

    Summary:

    Chuck camera in bag
    Ride whatever you want
    Have fun
    Take pics
    Don't obsess over your camera
    This.
    What good is an expensive camera sitting on a shelf? If you leave your camera at home all the time, you wasted your money.

    DSLRs can take more abuse than most people think. I've carried my Nikon D40/80/90s in various backpacks for years, and crashed numerous times on them. Dropped them, got them wet etc.. Never broke anything. Well, actually the D80 died, but not while riding. It fell off a moving car at 50mph (pro tip: don't put stuff on your car's roof after a ride). These are consumer bodies, a pro magnesium body will be even stronger.

    To keep the weight down, I will usually bring only one specific lens for the task and a remote flash. When I'm about to hit some particularly scary jump or something, I just take the pack off - most likely I'll be taking pictures there anyhow.
    wanted: Cannondale Lefty w/ V-brake studs

  39. #39
    offroader
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    2,190
    Or get a Micro 4/3 camera. Small enough to fit inside a camelbak yet still takes great pictures.

  40. #40
    Sandy Eggo
    Reputation: ablation's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    34
    I use this: Tamrac 5549 Adventure 9 Backpack (Red/Black) 554902 B&H Photo

    Bottom for lenses/ body. Top can hold a pump/ tubes/ tools/ extra water/ etc.


  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    24
    I'm in the same boat. I would love to take my rangefinder but have a Panasonic GF1 with 20mm that I'm going to take instead. Depending on your style of photography a GF1 can be had second hand on eBay for not a massive amount.

  42. #42
    Sandy Eggo
    Reputation: ablation's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    34
    anyone have any insurance recommendations for biking with a nice DSLR on my back?

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by Stripes View Post
    Katas are pretty much bombproof.
    Love my Kata bags. I have a Kata 3N1-22 that I use for my 40D. It's a little bulky for MTBing but I have no qualms about its ability to protect the camera. Last weekend I found a Kata Access-18 in a pile of laptop bags at the local Treasure Hunt type store. One of those places where the longer it sits the cheaper it gets. Picked it up for $31.99.

  44. #44
    Sweater
    Reputation: Buzzaro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,857
    Quote Originally Posted by nikojan View Post
    Its funny how it never turns out that way when it does happen. I had a friend who insured his new 300mm 2.8, dropped it where it started to make a noise everytime it zoomed in and out and the insurance wouldn't come through. Its a good backup but nothing beats a good sturdy bag and a cautious mentality
    Tell him to drop it again
    All out of S**** and down to my last F***

  45. #45
    Fartographer
    Reputation: Photo-John's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    1,875

    Clik Elite

    Clik Elite camera packs have changed the way I ride with my camera. I've always ridden with a digital SLR. That's just what you do if you're serious about mountain bike photos. But the Clik Elite packs are built for serious riding, running, skiing, etc. They totally protect your gear, they're made for hydration, and they fit better than anything else when you're on the bike. Here's my review for the Clik Elite Medium Nature. It's a discontinued pack but it will give you a good idea of what they're all about:

    Clik Elite Medium Nature Camera Pack >>

    Lowepro also has a new pack out made for more serious outdoor pursuits. It's called the Photo Sport AW. I've been using one one and off for a couple of months now and I think it's very good. It carries and protects camera gear well and it's made to accommodate a water bladder. I think the Clik packs ride a bit better on the bike but the Lowepro is also a solid option and they're just getting started with this new line of packs. Here's a preview article I wrote about the Lowepro:

    Lowepro Photo Sport AW Camera Pack >>

    By the way, I've crashed a bunch of times with DSLR gear on my back and I've never damaged a camera. I've damaged my self plenty, though. This summer I went over the bars at Deer Valley and sprained my ankle really bad. I'm just now getting back on the bike for real. On the other hand, the Olympus E-P3 I had in the pack suffered no damage at all. For me, the photos are more important than the risk of damaging my camera gear.
    Back of the camera, back of the pack.

  46. #46
    bay area CA
    Reputation: LONO100's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    198
    im subscribing to this thread, but i too am also a little suprised that there havent been any posts for some good sturdy bags that can protect an SLR or micro 4/3. if i find one, ill be sure to post it.

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    574
    Quote Originally Posted by LONO100 View Post
    im subscribing to this thread, but i too am also a little suprised that there havent been any posts for some good sturdy bags that can protect an SLR or micro 4/3. if i find one, ill be sure to post it.
    Serious? I posted the clik elite earlier. Check it out. Hydration and camera protection. Win/win


    Sent from my SPH-D710 using Tapatalk

  48. #48
    bay area CA
    Reputation: LONO100's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    198
    the clik elite looks pretty functional, its pretty bad ass in my opinion, but i was hoping there was a pack on the market that had some rigidness to it. i can imagine landing flat on my back while bailing and just crushing my camera if it was in that pack. ive seen backpacks that were made to hold DSLR's that had a hard shell inside the lining. the only problem with them for me and riding is that they didnt have any room for much else like an extra tube, and a few tools.

  49. #49
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5,878
    Quote Originally Posted by Fortuitous View Post
    From above:

    "DSLRs are more robust than most people can understand."

    Stop worrying, start riding, and make some pictures already.
    Just have to make sure not to stress the lens mounting point.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  50. #50
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5,878
    Quote Originally Posted by Fortuitous View Post
    "DSLRs are more robust than most people can understand."

    What is your mountain biking experience with film SLRs and DSLRs?
    On the bike, none.

    On the field, a lot. Was in Morocco this summer for 2 weeks, traveling all over the country. I had my Nikon D7000 and another person had her D60. One day we were attending a local presentation and she dropped her DSLR from about 2 feet high on flat ground. We had the same lenses btw, Nikkor 18-105, and the lens took the impact, and broke at the mounting bracket. Only damage was that plastic part, which was designed to break for that kind of impact. So we only had to replace that little part.

    Now imagine you packed your DSLR or SLR a bit tight where pression is applied on the end of the lens and on the camera body. Just get a good hit on the back if the pack and your wonderful day of photoshooting has just been reported. Kind of shitty, no ?

    Other then that, yeah, the magnesium body of my D7000 is pretty damn strong and light.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  51. #51
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5,878
    Quote Originally Posted by Fortuitous View Post
    That's what I thought.

    The forces involved when dropping a camera to flat vs. crashing while the camera is ina hydropack on your back are quite different.

    I've been riding for 20+ years with SLRs in packs, crashed plenty, and have never had a problem with my gear.

    "DSLRs are more robust than most people can understand."
    My first post was just an advice for those who might not be aware of. Nothing more or less. I would like to get my DSLR on trails, but even when I only carry my compact point and shoot Nikon and always my iPhone, I find myself always riding and not really stoping for pictures.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  52. #52
    Medi
    Reputation: medi.hash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    97

    Nikon D5100 inside Lowepro Adventure 40 inside Camelbak Blowfish

    I put my Nikon D5100 DSLR in a Lowepro Adventure 40 camera bag and I put that in my Camelbak Blowfish. I equip my camera with a 35mm 1.8 lens and bring an extra 40mm 2.8 macro lens in the Lowepro just in case





    Last edited by medi.hash; 01-22-2012 at 11:21 AM.
    2009 Niner S.I.R. 9
    2012 Spec SJ EVO 29er
    2008 Spec Tri-Cross
    2001 Spec FSR S-Works

    http://www.TemporaryObsessions.com

  53. #53
    Giddy Up!
    Reputation: caak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    157
    I have a clik elite compact sport, for my Nikon D5000. Can highly recommend it. Very functional all round. Bought from amazon, for $99 AUS.


    CAAK..


    CAAK
    --------- __o
    ------- _`\<,_
    ------ (*)/ (*)
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^\


  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    171
    Used to take my Canon T2i with me hiking and such... It took really good pictures... But, it was a PITA to lug around... Sold that and got a Canon S95... Loved it, period... Had a slight problem... That was I fell on it / broke it during a low speed dismount... It was my fault, accidents happen... Moving forward... I replaced the S95 with another fully capable compact... A Samsung WB2000 / TL350 that resides in an otter box 1000... Sure wish I would have had the S95 in a otter box before my mishap... With that said, a camera is only as good as one that you carry / take it with you without thinking about it...

  55. #55
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    171
    FYI, the thread title is:
    "How to protect a high end camera on the trail."
    A $600 plastic-bodied entry level DSLR is not a high end camera.

    Gotta give it to you "AP"... I mean , really !!! I can sleep better now in knowing a $ 600 camera is not a high end camera... Duh !!! Opinions are opinions... Thankfully, yours means nothing !!!

  56. #56
    poser Administrator
    Reputation: rockcrusher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    9,062
    Quote Originally Posted by Anorexic Panda View Post
    1. It's not an opinion, it's a fact. High end cameras are not $600
    2. If it means nothing, then why did you even bother to reply? Hmmmm...
    3. It's too bad that you were insulted by a mere fact. There's no accounting for fragility.
    In order to change the sway of this thread from "obvious troll" and antagonized trollee I have changed the title to "How to protect a DSLR on the trail?" Since the OP mentions in his text body that he has a high end camera but no comment on whether it is a hasselbad equipped D1 or a Rebel XTi and each person's definition of high end can vary depending on what they make and what their level of disposable income is this argument ends here. Got it?
    Try this: HTFU

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation: siggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    7
    I didn't bother to read all the posts but I'd say you should look into your homeowners insurance and see what kind of coverage it has for broken camera gear. You might need a rider of some sort or a separate "inland marine" policy.

    And for carrying the camera while riding, check out the Cotton Camera. They have a demo video with a guy mountain biking.

    cottoncarrier dot com

    That doesn't help in a crash but the insurance does that. And with the camera mounted on your chest (with the lens strap to hold it to you) you'll be more likely to take photos since its easy to get to. At least that's been my experience with using the Cotton Carrier while backpacking and bike touring.

  58. #58
    poser Administrator
    Reputation: rockcrusher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    9,062
    Quote Originally Posted by Anorexic Panda View Post
    Since the OP hasn't visited MTBR since 7/2011 I'm sure he won't be upset by you changing his thread title.

    The definition of a high end camera is not tied to one's income. Using that "logic" a $.99 disposable film camera would be "high end" just because a crazy homeless guy was using it.

    T2i = definitely not "high end" and many folks, especially industry folks, understand that fact.

    Digital Photography Review
    Which is why I changed the title. Some one that rides with a high end camera isn't necessarily having the same needs as some one riding with a DSLR. I rode this last weekend in a group that included a lot of professional mountain bike photographers and their gear and they definitely were not using Clic Bags, they were carrying bags that should have been on the backs of Sherpas.

    So the OP can take advice from here and others can take advice in here and not worry that they have a lower end DSLR as the advice in here is probably more applicable to them than someone with a D1. Or Sterling Lawrence. First Impression: Kona Honzo | Dirt Rag Magazine
    Try this: HTFU

  59. #59
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5,878
    So from what I understand from the last few posts, "high end" camera are way more fragile then cheap ones ? Isn't your high end product be built beefier, more precisely and last longer ? Honestly I would be more worried about structural damage to a $500 Sony then my $1600 Nikon DSLR body...

    Or is it the same as bike parts ? More expensive = weaker and more maintenance/care ??
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  60. #60
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5,878
    In fact, nice DSLR bodies are made out of many materials, as for example my Nikon D7000 have a full magnesium body with quality rubber coated grip areas, sealed (against dust, not waterproof) covers for ports, battery, view finder, etc. Then glass to protect the screen, etc. That's what makes them more expensive. My previous Nikon D50 wasn't build with much details since it was entry level, but still beat the hell out of a entry level Sony or Panasonic or whatever other DSLR in the same category.

    And I would be lot more concerned with the lens than the body itself when it comes down to carrying it down the trails.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  61. #61
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5,878
    ...
    Last edited by David C; 02-25-2012 at 09:28 AM. Reason: post deleted.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  62. #62
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5,878
    ...
    Last edited by David C; 02-25-2012 at 09:28 AM. Reason: post deleted.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  63. #63
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5,878
    ...
    Last edited by David C; 02-25-2012 at 09:27 AM. Reason: post deleted.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  64. #64
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    67
    I use the Lowepro DSLR Video Fastpack 150, its just the right size, I can fit my t1i, 2 extra lenses, a flash,some food, an extra shirt and a tripod, and I dont even notice it on my back. It has a built in rain cover too. Lowepro - DLSR Video Fastpack 150 AW


    Theres also something like the Inside Line Equipment Photo Bag Prime, which is more suited for city riding, but probably very nice. Photo Bag Prime | Inside Line Equipment | Cycling bags


  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,777
    i just purchased the clik elite probody sport, and can't wait to take it out on the trail. perfect configuration for me would be to take my d3 with 24-70 attached plus my 14-24 in case there are any great vistas to shoot...or other super wide opportunities....but out of the box, when i put the d3/24-70 in there, i don't see any room for the 14-24. has anyone used the probody and fit two decent size lenses in the bottom? i guess i could always put the other lens up top, but trying to keep that section clear for jacket, clif bars, etc....thanks!

  66. #66
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3,405
    Quote Originally Posted by whistlesglimberg View Post
    I use the Lowepro DSLR Video Fastpack 150, its just the right size, I can fit my t1i, 2 extra lenses, a flash,some food, an extra shirt and a tripod, and I dont even notice it on my back. It has a built in rain cover too.
    That's a slick pack, how do you carry water?
    I ride with the best dogs.




  67. #67
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    67
    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    That's a slick pack, how do you carry water?
    It's not a hydration pack, but I assume that if you want to you could probably put a bladder in the laptop compartment. Theres also a strecthy hit on the side to hold a water bottle/tripod.

    I just use my bottle cage!

  68. #68
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikerjohn64's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    162
    It looks like from the posts here that everyone can see that there is not just one "magic camera carrier" solution here.
    I think it's important to keep in mind that depending on your riding style; shooting style; camera set up and overall flexibility everyone's needs will be completely different.
    Over the years of shooting SLR; DSLR; Medium & Large Format and PnS cameras in the field my equipment closet is filled with bags; backpacks and holsters of all kind.
    I primarily use Lowpro for backpacks; holster; lens case and other interchangeable components and Tamrack for my shoulder bag.
    I feel it's important for anyone looking for the "right" carrier to ask themselves what their shooting style is. Do you have the time to get off your bike to set up? Are you a quick shooter? What is your subject? What time of day are you shooting? This will determine what equipment you will need which will almost tell you what you need to carry all your equipment.
    My favorite is the Lowepro chest holsters bags which allows me to keep the camera body with a lens up against my chest for a quick draw. I don't even have to get off the bike if I don't need to. If I need various lenses; I will coordinate this setup with their belt system with lens pouches. This still allows me to wear a Camelbak and ride very efficiently. I wear this setup for skiing with too. Works great for a mobile setup. I have managed to carry an SLR with a 70-200 f2.8 lens on my chest with short wide zoom on my belt with flash. I have 3 chest bags in different sizes. For anything more complex shooting needs; I have a full backpack allowing me to carry a 300mm f2.8 lens with 2 bodies; flashes ; tripod and anything I need.
    So a short answer in a long way around; everybody has a different need for carrying their equipment(whatever that may be).
    If you are timid about bringing your equipment out in the field; I would highly suggest starting with a 1-lens/body setup using a chest bag to start. It's easy to protect in the case you bail off your bike.
    All said; don't let any of this from holding you back from taking photos on the trail. Go out have fun and creat some memory!

  69. #69
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    24
    I feel safer with the camera on my back than in the smash and grab car. The camera usually means the ride is compromised with a little bit more of a cautious pace.
    Bryce Jenkinson Photography
    www.studioido.net

  70. #70
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3,405
    I have a self imposed limit of what will fit in my hawg. Beyond that it's a photo shoot and not a ride.

    Having said that, I have put on many 100's of miles with a pelican case bungied on a rear rack. No worries about my gear and relatively accessible. I keep an assortment of sizes of pelican cases because they will get my gear anywhere reliably. I'm out in dusty windy conditions almost daily so I need a worry proof place to store and transport my gear under a pile of other outdoor gear, muddy dogs, bikes, tools, and etc, in the back of my battered truck or on some mountain or river. I still replace camera gear regularly due to wear and tear and sensor cleanings so at some point you have to ask yourself how much weight you are willing to carry and what you can afford to replace without putting the ole lady out on the street and be content to use that. Camera gear is incidental at best compared to quality of light, your eye, where you are, and what you're doing, right?
    I ride with the best dogs.




  71. #71
    lucky enough
    Reputation: cocavaak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    855
    I agree with you bj64. I use a Lowepro in a chest harness fashion. As you and others have pointed out this this gives you the quickest draw.
    As far as falling, I think my camera is better protected on my chest rather than on my back. One time I clipped a pedal and went down - cracked a rib - and my camera was fine. I tend to land on my shoulders or back. Plus if you have time to pull off the tuck and roll thing your'e rolling onto your back.
    "Don't take life so serious, son . . . it ain't no how permanent." - Porky Pine

  72. #72
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,895
    I know I am not answering the original question but IMHO, EVIL cameras are the way to go for hiking/biking photography, especially when replacing $600 DSLRs. Or an M8.

    But I confess, I also hiked some with one of these in an F64 bag (which is where my 4x5 Technika currently resides).

    .

  73. #73
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,542

  74. #74
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    316
    Man, this thread really took off

    Thanks everyone for the excellent advice.

    I had some life adventures that took me off the bike for a few months but I am back on as of today.

    I will read through all this info and try out some of these excellent suggestions


    Thank You !
    I'd rather be riding than healing, body armor is your friend !

  75. #75
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    37
    Hey everyone just want to make a few suggestions. I have a Nikon D300 and 5 lenses flashes etc. I purchased a kata 3in1 largest one available and it is a strong durable bag. It is however bulky and somewhat awkward. Not sure it would be the best option out there for you.

    I think without a doubt if you want ultimate protection, a pelican case would be bullet prof for you. The downside a tad heavy but you can guarantee total protection 100%.

    Also just a suggestion. I own a cannon G12 point and shoot. This thing is as close to an slr that you can get. A friend took it to BC during the Olympics and snowboarded with it non stop. It's small and sturdy well built camera.

    You can google the G series and will find that any photo site will highly recommend this little camera. It is packed with punch and would never disappoint.

  76. #76
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    30
    I use a Vanguard UP-Rize 34 sling pack. This thing is bomb proof. I've taken it dirtbiking in Dubai and Skiing in Switzerland. Its seriously been around the world with me and its protected everything I've ever carried and been super convienent for grabbing the DSLR quickly for some fun shots. Worth every penny. I usually take my Pentax K-5, 10-17 Fisheye and 50mm 1.4 prime with me. But it fits my 70-300mm and 17-50mm in there no problem as well. Great bag, I forget its there sometimes when I'm biking.

    Vanguard


  77. #77
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    113
    I have a flipside 300 back pack that stores my camera body with multiple lenses and some food. Its padded well and very sturdy so it protects my gear quite well.
    I still worry a bit because theres a couple grand on my back

  78. #78
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,542
    if you guys are carrying so much gear, isn't it better to get the weight on a utility rack on the bike vs your body.

  79. #79
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    113
    mine isnt heavy by any means, and the back pack is rather small. I use it for exploring abandonements as well so its small enough to not get in the way but large enough to carry gear.
    my thinking is seeing as I protect my body before my bike when im crashing into things on the trail Id rather my gear be on my back. One thing Im trying to decide on is whether to keep my tripod strapped to my back pack or making a mount on my frame.

  80. #80
    North Van/Whistler
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,627
    Quote Originally Posted by bob13bob View Post
    if you guys are carrying so much gear, isn't it better to get the weight on a utility rack on the bike vs your body.
    If you're riding anything remotely technical you'd soon figure out that the rack is a bad idea
    Locals' Guide to North Shore Rides http://mtbtrails.ca/

  81. #81
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3,405
    Quote Originally Posted by LeeL View Post
    If you're riding anything remotely technical you'd soon figure out that the rack is a bad idea
    Modern frame packs could be an alternative. Carousel and others make custom frame packs.

    A smallish (ie up to maybe a 1300) Pellican case on a rear or seatpost rack is pretty unobtrusive and gets the weight off your back or lets you use a camelpack for water and gear.

    FYI
    I ride with the best dogs.




  82. #82
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    10,537


    I drop my T2i inside the bag above and then drop that into my backpack. The Lowerpo bag has 4 D-rings so eventually I'll rig it to the front of my chest off my hydration pack.

    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  83. #83
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3,405
    ^^^Isn't a chest pack asking for a broken rib/s? That's a lot of misery for any possible reward.
    I ride with the best dogs.




  84. #84
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    10,537
    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    ^^^Isn't a chest pack asking for a broken rib/s? That's a lot of misery for any possible reward.
    If you want fast access to a camera you have to be able to get it without taking off your backpack every time you want to grab a shot.

    I can't recall the last time I ended up crashing and landing on my chest...having said that obviously you need to ride with awareness of what the consequences may be and take that into account when deciding how fast you are going to ride a section of trail.

    Is it worth the risk to get 2 - 3 times as many shots? For sure in my world it is.

    If I am going ride balls to the wall as fast as I can on the hardest trails I can ride will I be carrying a DSLR with me front or back?....no.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  85. #85
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    113
    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    If I am going ride balls to the wall as fast as I can on the hardest trails I can ride will I be carrying a DSLR with me front or back?....no.
    thats the most important thing to remember, when you intend on riding hard the camera stays home (in my case)

  86. #86
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    842
    Yesterday I rode for the first time with my Clik Elite Access chest pack. I used a D7000 with a 28mm f2.8 lens. The combo is relatively light and I barely noticed it when I was riding. I would have noticed it more if I had a heavier lens like my 24-120mm.

    The Clik Elite doesn't provide a lot of protection for the camera, so I was a little more conservative than usual, but I don't feel like it compromised my ride. I had almost as quick access as I do with my p&s camera. Boy did I love the ability to shoot continuously! Here are the results: SMBA 3-23-12 Photo Gallery by j_harvey at pbase.com. I'm wearing the camera pack without camera in some of the shots.

    I'll still bring my p&s camera if my primary purpose is riding, but if I go on a "photography ride", I'll bring the DSLR with the chest bag.

  87. #87
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikerjohn64's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    162
    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    ^^^Isn't a chest pack asking for a broken rib/s? That's a lot of misery for any possible reward.
    Not really.
    It's your body's most natural reflex to protect the most vulnerable part of of your body-the frontal area.
    Three words........ Tuck and Roll. ;-)

  88. #88
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3,405
    Quote Originally Posted by bikerjohn64 View Post
    Not really.
    It's your body's most natural reflex to protect the most vulnerable part of of your body-the frontal area.
    Three words........ Tuck and Roll. ;-)
    The hardest crashes I've had in my 26 year mtb career have been crossing up or hooking a pedal at speed. No time to tuck and roll, usually hit chest first. Even a rib bruise is terribly painful. YMOV
    I ride with the best dogs.




  89. #89
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by ablation View Post
    anyone have any insurance recommendations for biking with a nice DSLR on my back?
    Check your homeowners insurance policy or rental insurance policy. Call them an add the camera gear to it and go ride.

    I am insured though by business.

  90. #90
    dedicated beater
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    164
    I'll echo the votes for using the chestpack. I'm using a Mountainsmith Descent AT and it's the only way I can usually get the camera out in time to snap off a few shots of my fellow riders. Maybe it's just me, but most people I ride with quickly get sick of stopping, setting up a shot, shooting and packing up again. With the chestpack, I can usually get ahead of the pack, scout for a cool scene, drop the bike shoot and get back on without losing any time to the slowest rider in the group. Yeah, I don't ride as hard as I usually might with the chest pack on, but I'm not wearing it to ride hard - I'm trying to get as many great quality shots as possible.

  91. #91
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,777
    i love chest packs for the easy access..i guess it's just a tradeoff versus having a big heavy dslr in front of you. i've done a couple of short, local rides with a smaller dslr in front, but my 'big boy' camera would be more difficult to put up there. i'm going to try the clik probody sport that i recently got, it sure works well for hikes and is comfy to boot.

  92. #92
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    184
    I just got a clik compact sport for my T2i , it really fits well, and I like how it feels on me, and there is plenty of room for extras and specially the bladder, the bladder been in the outside is +, tomorrow will be my first time using it , I'll keep you posted on how it performed on the trails.

  93. #93
    Carbon HT Pilot
    Reputation: willymoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    25
    I run my D300 without the grip on a Cotton carrier chest rig. I usually take it with a 50mm 1.8 Nikor or 18-50mm Sigma. Both are cheap lenses so not too worried about damage. The chest rig lets me roll out quick to shoot my kids. If I ride hard I leave the camera and just use my Galaxy SII. I post process everything with Lightroom, so I don't worry too much about lens selection out on the trail.
    2012 Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 29er
    2013 P26Pro
    2012 P20Pro

    Barrel end of my Nikon D300
    http://www.activeaperture.com

  94. #94
    High Gravity Haze
    Reputation: Spec7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Posts
    412
    I bought the Lowepro Fastpack 350 a couple of years ago with the intention of riding w/ my D300, D50, 80-200 f/2.8, 35 f/1.8, and 50 f/1.8 in it. My verdict on that turned out to be:
    If simply using the bike as a means to get to a spot for a photo shoot, the bag is great and does a great job of protecting the camera.
    If riding with the idea of "I'll grab a great pic if I run across one", but the ride is mostly about the ride; the pack fails. It's too bulky.

    I still ride w/ my D300, but I keep the 35 f/1.8 on it and stuff it down in my Osprey pack. With that grade of body (magnesium construction) I'm not too worried about damage to the camera or lens due to its size. The camera/lens combo was thrown about 15 feet while doing trail work one day and landed in a puddle. Fastest 15 feet I've ever ran in my life and I'm pretty sure my heart rate was 2x max, but I picked it up, cleaned it, and it still shoots great today. The prosumer grade camera's are tougher than most folks give them credit for.

  95. #95
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by _Tricon_ View Post
    I use a Vanguard UP-Rize 34 sling pack. This thing is bomb proof. I've taken it dirtbiking in Dubai and Skiing in Switzerland. Its seriously been around the world with me and its protected everything I've ever carried and been super convienent for grabbing the DSLR quickly for some fun shots. Worth every penny. I usually take my Pentax K-5, 10-17 Fisheye and 50mm 1.4 prime with me. But it fits my 70-300mm and 17-50mm in there no problem as well. Great bag, I forget its there sometimes when I'm biking.

    *snip*
    This is really cool. The only camera bags I've found look really bulky and not suitable for riding. As I shoot with a 4/3rds these seem right up my alley.

    With a sling bag though, does it move around much while riding?

  96. #96
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    8,016
    I only saw one mention of the Lowepro Flipside 300. I've seen a few for sale on my local Craigslist and just did some researching on it. As a strictly photo gear carrying pack (no hydration) the 300 looks pretty competent.

    Can anyone here give a long term test report on the Flipside 300? Specifically, how does the pack feel against your back, do the zippers open up enough to access your kit quickly, when you have the whole pack stuffed with gear is it quick and intuitive to get whatever you want out of there? How does the tripod strap do? Is the side pocket big enough to really carry much? Thanks.
    So it seems to me to be, this thing that I think I see.

  97. #97
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    113
    Seeing I mentioned the Flipside 300 I can tell you a bit about it.
    I usually carry 4 lenses and one body in it, a few protien bars and a water bottle on the outside.

    Ive used it for over 2 years, very comfortable, you hardly notice its there, the back and strap pads are great and the shell is not hard but formed so it doesnt flex and gives great protection.

    When you have the lower strap around your stomache you simply take off the shoulder straps and spin the bag from your back to your front and flips down to a 90 degree angle for fast and easy access. its really awesome and easy to use. also fully adjustable inside.

    If you can find one I suggest getting it.
    I use it for exploring abandoned building too and constantly have my tri pod strapped to it

    Side pocket carries my spare batteries, cleaner, wireless trigger, and spare memory card. Its not really big, but theres an extra removable zippered pouch inside for things which sometimes carry food, sometimes carries remotes triggers and filters

Members who have read this thread: 3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •