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  1. #1
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    How do you get this photo effect?

    I've come across a few photos with this effect recently. I really like it, have no idea how to do it. Is it just a photoshop filter or is there a multi-step trick to this?

    How do you get this photo effect?-image.jpg

  2. #2
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    There's a lot going on in that picture; can you be more specific on the effect you (think) you see?
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  3. #3
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    Looks HDR to me, possibly with some post processing using Topaz Adjust or something similar.

  4. #4
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    Looks like a contrast adjustment and reduced amount of colors? I'm no photoshop expert by any means.

  5. #5
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    There are also layering techniques whereby you lay the same image over itself for enhancement etc. Can really vivify colouring.

  6. #6
    saddlemeat
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    I like the look, simplified, contrasted, and saturated. I could get visually close in PS if I had the full size original and enhanced images to examine close up. Very similar to a look I like and which is a combination of PS adjustments and effects...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails How do you get this photo effect?-lolly-pup-jwitt.jpg  

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  7. #7
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    I messed around with the HDR adjustment and I'd say Tim was right. Cranking up the Detail in the HDR settings looks to be the start of getting this look with photos. Thanks for all of the replies! Gonna mess with it some more. I'll post up a result.

  8. #8
    trail projectile
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    How do you get this photo effect?

    Lots of lighting control too. Small aperture. Increased definition and mid contrast. Prolly HDR but not necessarily.

  9. #9
    trail projectile
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    How do you get this photo effect?

    Look at the light sources...

  10. #10
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    Do you think they used a delayed flash on it?

  11. #11
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    I don't think there's any lighting besides the ambient room light from overhead fixtures and possibly a window to camera left.

  12. #12
    trail projectile
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajdemo76 View Post
    Do you think they used a delayed flash on it?
    Probably not, but lots of ways to do this potentially, ranging from detailed control of light sources (lots of hidden lights) or detailed control of subject ("everyone stay perfectly still"), but the scene doesn't suggest that.

    Another option would be that there were not huge exposure challenges (either because the scene was brighter or the camera tech was particularly suited to low light...) and instead it's all post production: increase definition, bring out shadows, pump up vibrancy. This option is my bet... considering the amount of ISO noise in the image.

    What do we actually know about this shot (assuming it's not a huge photoshop job?): High ISO, small-med aperture, relatively "fast" shutter (like 1/30 or so... it's got soft focus, but no real dragging I can see, and the TV image at upper left is not a blur..). The scene suggests it's a candid. So, my bet is on a handheld, image stabilized, high iso shot with a relatively wide angle on a full frame sensor, with post production which emphasizes definition, vibrancy, and mid range contrast.

    I see no evidence of a flash unless it's a very well hidden, carefully powered (like, almost off!) slave unit with a tight shield or snoot. The reason I say that is that the exposure of the transmissive items (e.g. lights) in the room seems consistent and proportional to the exposure levels of reflective items (people, clothes, bar, etc.). Doesn't look like light was added except perhaps in the very foreground, but who knows... the photog could have been standing below a big fixture or something. I think that's his soup on the counter.

    The only thing that really bothers me about this shot is there is only one apparent light source, and the pattern of light on the ceiling seems inconsistent with how someone would place/wire light fixtures in a room...

  13. #13
    saddlemeat
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    ^HDR editing could explain the rather even and slightly unreal exposure levels.
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  14. #14
    Airborne Flight Crew
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    Seriously doubt it's HDR. With the exposure required, there would be some ghosting somewhere - as all those people could not be still. They would have to match up when the exposures were blended together.

    Easiest and most likely - this was edited in Lightroom. Shadows were boosted as high as possible, highlights and whites were brought down, and the "Clarity" slider - which adjusts mid tone contrast was probably boosted pretty high.

    You can achieve the same/similar effect in photoshop, but it's not a filter. Use the shadow/highlights adjustment and it gets pretty close.

    These are not HDR, they are single exposures.

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    These two shots were taken outside, but have the settings described above applied in Lightroom, you can see the similarity even though the photo is question is an interior shot.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhazard View Post
    Seriously doubt it's HDR. With the exposure required, there would be some ghosting somewhere - as all those people could not be still. They would have to match up when the exposures were blended together.
    You can also create an HDR from a single exposure. That increases noise and I do see some noise in the photo. But I agree that Lightroom can do similar stuff. In fact, with the latest version of Lightroom I have found that I don't need to shoot multiple exposures for HDR much anymore. The exposure controls and the clarity slider can achieve much of the same effect.

    Great photos by the way!

  16. #16
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    There was (is) a filter that came out a few years back that many went nuts for that did this type of effect. I don't recall the name of it, but it was very expensive IMHO for a filter, like in the neighborhood of $150 to $250. I think the plug-in was $150 and the stand alone app was $250. . . . IIRC

    If that shot was done with standard Photoshop actions, I'd like to see the tutorial if anyone has access to it.

  17. #17
    Airborne Flight Crew
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    This might be the software jeffj is referring to:
    HDR photography software & plugin for Lightroom, Aperture & Photoshop - Tone Mapping, Exposure Fusion & High Dynamic Range Imaging for photography

    HDR from a single exposure? I think a I saw plug in a while back that claimed to do this, but I thought High Dynamic Range images were by definition a multiple of exposures - one or more for highlights, midtones and shadows, as no camera has the capability to capture a full range of details at once. Maybe cameras got better?

    Tim, that's an impressive gallery btw, I am humbled. Love the motorsports stuff
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  18. #18
    saddlemeat
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    HDR is just Zone system approach to digital editing, and you can do it digitally like Ansel did, from a single exposure. You can do most anything manually in PS or LR, and it's not a bad way to go, as you can get a more original/proprietary look that way. I'm a fine artist so I don't process much volume but I do sometimes work on an image for many days, exploring how the image reacts to many different approaches, and then finally combining a series of individual global and locals edits to produce the final image. Even the PS default filters can be used in really creative ways to develop a look. Take an image and see what you can coax out of it using only the levels, saturation, and sharpening tools, I bet you can get pretty close to that HDR look. Throw in the curve tool and you can probably do it better. Add a filter or two and you're famous!
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  19. #19
    Airborne Flight Crew
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    HDR is just Zone system approach to digital editing, and you can do it digitally like Ansel did, from a single exposure. You can do most anything manually in PS or LR, and it's not a bad way to go, as you can get a more original/proprietary look that way. I'm a fine artist so I don't process much volume but I do sometimes work on an image for many days, exploring how the image reacts to many different approaches, and then finally combining a series of individual global and locals edits to produce the final image. Even the PS default filters can be used in really creative ways to develop a look. Take an image and see what you can coax out of it using only the levels, saturation, and sharpening tools, I bet you can get pretty close to that HDR look. Throw in the curve tool and you can probably do it better. Add a filter or two and you're famous!

    HDR vs. "HDR LOOK"

    I disagree - HDR is based on multiple exposures, where in the Zone System, one exposes for the highlight then massages the negative/print during development to accentuate the rest of the tonal range below.

    HDR takes a separate exposure for each: One image for highlights > One image for mid tones > One image for shadows - then combine all three. That is HDR.

    Its not based upon tweaking a single exposure. You can tweak an image all day long in photoshop, but if the detail in a zone hasn't been captured, you can't invent it. You can tweak, and create an "HDR look", but if the data is not there... it's not there.

    I think people see an image that has the "HDR look" and just assume some things about it was created. That "look" is usually a result of an image being overcooked in post, because it's more dramatic, and is not difficult to imitate, but it misses the point of what hdr is about: capturing detail across the tonal range. In a well processed HDR image, it should almost not be obvious...

    And then again, art is quite subjective, isn't it... and people like dramatic images, no matter how they were created
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  20. #20
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    Holyshit ! Jhazard that is amazing work man , your pix came out super sick ! Love it ..

  21. #21
    saddlemeat
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    Jhazard- I agree for the most part with your definition of HDR, but you can also set the exposure levels so that you don't over or under expose anything and then set them as you please later. Everything is subjective...
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    Jhazard- I agree for the most part with your definition of HDR, but you can also set the exposure levels so that you don't over or under expose anything and then set them as you please later. Everything is subjective...
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  23. #23
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    Thanks!!
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  24. #24
    saddlemeat
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    Am I the only one who feels that HDR images many times have too much detail? My normal work flow is to simplify as much as I can so as to emphasize the subject. While admittedly not a big user of the HDR workflow, my observation is that I feel like the image has an unrealistic level of detail, and that blurrs the overall impact, a little or a lot. Maybe it's just bad HDR technique I'm noticing. I associate true HDR with tripods and big cameras in a cathedral or shooting food, sounds like that may not be the case as much.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhazard View Post
    This might be the software jeffj is referring to:
    HDR photography software & plugin for Lightroom, Aperture & Photoshop - Tone Mapping, Exposure Fusion & High Dynamic Range Imaging for photography

    HDR from a single exposure? I think a I saw plug in a while back that claimed to do this, but I thought High Dynamic Range images were by definition a multiple of exposures - one or more for highlights, midtones and shadows, as no camera has the capability to capture a full range of details at once. Maybe cameras got better?

    Tim, that's an impressive gallery btw, I am humbled. Love the motorsports stuff
    Yep - Photomatix is one of the most popular ones out there. I have it but don't use it much after the latest Lightroom major revision came out. I worked with Oloneo Photo Engine for a while and helped with their beta testing and preferred the results from that program over anything else I have tried (and I have tried a lot). Regarding HDR from a single exposure - you can take a raw image and save an underexposed version and overexposed version along with the "normal" exposure version and you have a set of 3 shots for the HDR software. Much nosier that way. There's also a program I played with called Machinery HDR which actually works very well with one exposure to give that HDR look.

    And thanks for the nice comment on my gallery! I'm fairly new at motorsports but I keep getting out there and practicing every chance I get. GRAND-AM is coming here next month and I hope my media credentials get approved.

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