Results 1 to 24 of 24

Thread: 35mm - Yep

  1. #1
    I eat cats
    Reputation: Gordon Shumway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1,528

    35mm - Yep

    So I had a few beers the other night and got the bright idea to pull out my 1990-something Canon EOS RebelX S. After getting it out I realized how fun shooting real film used to be, especially the anticipation of "I wonder how that will come out." I did a couple years of photo in HS and another year of it in college before I went the business school route and I always told myself I would revisit photography. Well, here I am... I ordered batteries and film to get my 35mm back into action. I also have a 110/220 camera that was given to me by a family friend who used to use it for LAPD forensics, but that will sit for awhile until I see if I actually like taking old school pictures again. In a dorky way I am excited to shoot some pictures over Christmas and get some "duplicates" made for family and send them via snail mail.

    No, I am not hipster.. I just figured I would bring back some of the good 'ol days. Anyone else still using film?
    Quote Originally Posted by CannondaleF9 View Post
    You see, I don't have a single brand name in my signature because I know most bike brands and component brands 99%.

  2. #2
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    2,458
    ^I shoot the odd roll, then put it in the freezer with all the rest of the rolls awaiting development. Half the 35mm shots I forget to focus or set exposure because I'm used to automatic digital gear. I especially enjoy setting up my Mamiya C220 TLR, reading exposure with the huge Luna Lux light meter, composing on the waist level ground glass viewfinder, setting big dials, cocking and releasing the shutter and finally cranking the film advance. I guess it's more about using the old familiar gear than getting useful pictures for me. I enjoyed the process of developing film and making prints as well. Your project sounds fun, let us know how it goes, maybe post a pic or two.
    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mort1369's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    46
    Maybe. . . . .


  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Saul Lumikko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,098
    The cheap way to go proper wide with EF lenses:




  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mort1369's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    46
    Done with a pawn shop 24mm Nikkor AF (on my manual focus Nikon F2). . .


  6. #6
    Just Ride
    Reputation: Cormac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,740
    I just got a DSLR, I don't miss film at all! I like that fact that I can fire off several pictures of the same thing, maybe different angles till I get the picture just how I want!
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: milt k's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    391
    Too Funny! I dug out my (1979) Canon A-1 about the time you found your camera! Mine did not survive storage well, as all the foam light seals, and the foam for the mirror turned to goo.
    And like you, I remembered how fun it was, so off to the camera shop it went, for repair. Should be done in a few days, and when weather permits, i'm ready to get out and practice with it! Don't even know what film i'm gonna buy, looking at kodak ektar 100, maybe!

  8. #8
    I eat cats
    Reputation: Gordon Shumway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1,528
    I just took some more photos with my 35mm here at the beach. Haven't finished enough rolls to justify getting them developed. I noticed some dust in my lenses and had to clean the lens filters but hopefully there aren't too many fuzzy dust aliens in my pics! I will post a digital version when I do develop them (don't they put them on disk or drive for you now too?). Thanks for all the replies and pics!
    Quote Originally Posted by CannondaleF9 View Post
    You see, I don't have a single brand name in my signature because I know most bike brands and component brands 99%.

  9. #9
    Just Ride
    Reputation: Cormac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,740
    Last time I developed film was last summer. They came on disk as well
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mort1369's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    46
    Of course, the first pic tells the true story. Taken just as I was falling on my butt.


  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Klainmeister's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    91
    I shoot a mix of 35mm (Nikon FE), 120 (Yaschica LM), and 4x5 (Zone VI) and digital for action only. Hell, I even have a full operational darkroom too. Between dynamic range and forcing the user to slow down, why not use film?

  12. #12
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    2,458
    Quote Originally Posted by Klainmeister View Post
    I shoot a mix of 35mm (Nikon FE), 120 (Yaschica LM), and 4x5 (Zone VI) and digital for action only. Hell, I even have a full operational darkroom too. Between dynamic range and forcing the user to slow down, why not use film?
    Because you don't like cloning dust specks out of scans?

    I admire your resolve... and would love to see some pics posted here. Do you make prints too?
    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Klainmeister's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    91
    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    Because you don't like cloning dust specks out of scans?

    I admire your resolve... and would love to see some pics posted here. Do you make prints too?
    Sure. Here's a 4x5 shot from a trip out to Cathedral Valley, Utah



    And some Velvia 50 shot with a Mamiya 7ii:



    And another BW:



    I don't do as much silver-gelatin printing anymore, but rather platinum/palladium, carbon, and other processes. These are handcoated onto art paper, then I create a enlarged negative and print with a UV enlarger and vacuum base. So here's that first image as a 20x14" platinum/palladium print:



    This summer I am going to be doing some photo work for a bike shop here in town and we're going to do a series of BW 35mm to enlarge traditionally and frame for around the store. Film ain't dead!

    The color images I have I usually print on an Epson printer now that Cibachromes are gone. Bummer, but then again, the Epson stuff is incredible. You can see some more of my stuff on this little blog that I started a while ago: ksklain.com

  14. #14
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    2,458
    ^Great stuff, thanks for sharing! I like the Epson printers too, crawled out of the darkroom in 1998.
    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    221
    Quote Originally Posted by Klainmeister View Post

    And some Velvia 50 shot with a Mamiya 7ii:
    I just love the look of Velvia -- and this is a great example!

    -db-

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    120
    I still shoot mostly film. My favorite camera is this Canonet I found at Goodwill some years ago for $10:

    35mm - Yep-20071010_01.jpg

    For a long time my favorite film was Fuji Reala 100, but they stopped making it. Lately I have been using Kodak Extar 100, mostly. I also really like Kodak's chromogenic BW400CN, but that is getting harder to find lately as well.

    Thread drift: If you print photos at home I strongly urge you to make sure you use paper and ink that are designed to work with each other. I work for a company that produces commercial/retail photo printers and I regularly see test results from print permanence labs. Just choosing the wrong paper can cause your prints to curl and fade noticeably after just a couple of years.

    If you get photos printed professionally, I recommend using a place that offers either inkjet or silver halide printing. Silver halide printing is disappearing fast, but there are still drug stores and retailers out there with Fuji and Noritsu wet labs. Some wet labs are being replaced by inkjet "dry labs." Professional inkjet and silver halide prints should offer 75+ years of fade resistance.

    Beware of retailers who are switching to dye sub printers. These are favored by a lot of retailers because they are smaller, cheaper and lower maintenance than inkjet or wet labs. But they use only a three color process and they have poor print permanence (8-20 year fade resistance).

    Edited to add: For best fade resistance you should use inkjet printers with pigment-based inks, not dye-based inks. Of course if you ask a photo department employee they will have no idea which technology their printers use. But the same holds true if you buy an inkjet printer for home use: pigment based inks are far superior for photo printing.

  17. #17
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    2,458
    ^Good advice, although the Epson Claria dye ink set meets your criteria for permanence. The excellent Epson 1400 or 1430 use this inkset, can produce prints that are as good or perhaps better than the pigment printers can output, and I recommend them highly for amateur printers. No wet process prints meet the 75 year permanence criteria, that I am aware of, although Fuji Crystal Archive paper comes close.

    I started making fine art inkjet prints with the aftermarket Media Street pigment inks in the original epson stylus photo printer in 1999 after watching my dye prints orange shift within less than a year in some cases. My how things have changed since then!

    I still have my Canonet but admittedly don't use it much. I replaced it with a Nikon Coolpix 950 and a small Toughbook computer in '98, and never looked back. Never went back to the darkroom either. I have a few friends who carry their M3-7's regularly, process through the local Walmart photo dept, and then scan and print. It's hard to do your own wet processing when you don't do it regularly, chemicals are expensive and you waste most of the batch.

    My hat is off to anyone who shoots film, would love to see some of your images! The pics below are two fine art pic/prints I finished recently. They are printed on Moab Entrada Natural with Claria inks and coated with Premier Art Print Shield. I believe they will last 25 years if framed and displayed properly, beyond that I don't care as I will probably be biking in the sky by then.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 35mm - Yep-10oct13-730am-copy.jpg  

    35mm - Yep-afternoonalley-copy.jpg  

    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    120
    Thanks for the info on the Epson inks. Those test results certainly match what I've seen for the best pigment-based inks.

    Here are some film shots I made a few years ago. My more recent photos are on a different PC.

    35mm - Yep-20080209_10s.jpg
    (Canonet QL-17 GIII)

    35mm - Yep-20071222_12s.jpg
    Yashica Electro GSN-35

    35mm - Yep-20080103_17s.jpg
    Nikon EM, 28mm lens (camera + lens $5 at Goodwill!)

    35mm - Yep-20080128_03s.jpg
    (Nikon EM)

    35mm - Yep-20080622_07s.jpg
    (The tell-tale Canonet pentagonal bokeh)

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    120
    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    Because you don't like cloning dust specks out of scans?
    Good point.

    The easiest way around this is to get your film professionally processed and get the photo CD option. Unfortunately this adds $4-5 per roll to the cost of shooting film.

    Another option is to get a film scanner with Digital ICE. This uses infrared light to eliminate most dust and scratches during scanning.

    Or do like I did: Get a job working in a test lab with free access to a Pakon professional film scanner

  20. #20
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    2,458
    Yashica Electro 35 GT (Not recently taken but recently scanned on an Epson 4870)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 35mm - Yep-chris.jpg  

    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Klainmeister's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    91
    Bsieb: I have a 1400 and a 3880 and I find my 1400 images have more pizazze to them...hard to explain, but they glow by comparison. I need the pigments though for the UV blocking effects in making digital negatives.

  22. #22
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    2,458
    ^I find digital negative prints fascinating, would you describe your workflow?
    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Klainmeister's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    91
    Sure, I take my hi-res scan (for 4x5, typically 10,000x8,000) and get the image (BW) in the contrast/gamma/etc set as if I were to print it on paper. I then invert it, size (360dpi) it, and then use a program called QuadToneRIP to handle the printing application. In QTR, I create a contrast curve using individual ink densities for my desired process (for example, a cyanotype is much more contrasty than a platinum print). I then load in Pictorico OHP transparency film and print out of QTR the inverted image with it's corresponding ink-density determined contrast curve.

    I then coat my paper with the emulsion (once again, cyanotype, pt/pd, whatever) wait for it to be dry to the touch, place it in a vacuum frame, lay over the negative, and then use a 1000 watt UV bulb to expose until I get my desired black point/DMAX.

    So, consider this: the image I posted above of Cathedral Valley (PT/PD print) went from negative, home developed, scanned, corrected, inverted, calibrated, printed, emulsion coating, setting, exposing, developing, washing, and flattening before you see that final image.

    ^_^

  24. #24
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    2,458
    ^Thanks Klainmeister, lots of work there, much respect! Your workflow reminds me of the way I print with liquid asphalt on steel, except for the obviously kludge output media difference (see pic below).

    I use QTR on my Epson 4000 for bw output. The pigments do better than the Claria inks for bw. I don't do a lot of bw currently, but get the urge now and then.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 35mm - Yep-hdt-fox.jpg  

    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

Similar Threads

  1. Looking for 35mm optic for XM-L
    By roxtar in forum Lights DIY - Do It Yourself
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-17-2013, 02:44 PM
  2. 35mm 7up XML board!
    By kwarwick in forum Lights DIY - Do It Yourself
    Replies: 71
    Last Post: 06-08-2012, 04:11 AM
  3. 35mm bars
    By JonathanGennick in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-19-2012, 09:20 AM
  4. Looking for a 35mm housing
    By kwarwick in forum Lights DIY - Do It Yourself
    Replies: 42
    Last Post: 05-09-2011, 07:27 AM
  5. 35mm version for an XML?
    By mtroy in forum Lights DIY - Do It Yourself
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 01-24-2011, 08:35 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •