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  1. #1
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    Proper technique on close spaced rollers on Rays Revenge?

    I love riding at Raystown, and I know they are considered relatively easy trails. My favorite trail there might be Rays Revenge in the clockwise direction.

    The issue I have is that there are a couple high speed sections where the roller spacing gets really tight and I'm going way too fast to absorb them. I can't help but get air, and end up landing front heavy on the up slope of the next roller.

    First time there, I made it through, despite getting a bit out of sorts. My last trip down, I was likely going faster, and lost it twice, resulting in two high speed crashes and one gashed knee.

    I don't have experience in BMX, pump tracks, and manuals in general. I could almost see someone manualing through them, like BMX racers do, but from memory, they seem maybe a bit tall for that. So maybe they are meant to be aired out and doubled up, landing on the backside of the second roller? I'm not much for jumping yet, but I'm thinking this may be the case.

    What is the 'proper' method? How do you run them??

    ------

    Also wouldn't mind some trail suggestions for PA in general. I've ridden Rothrock, Raystown, Moraine, and Merli-Sarnoski. I enjoy tough rock gardens and bigger rocks/boulders, but like every type of riding. What other trails should I be looking to hit?

  2. #2
    Ride da mOOn Moderator
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Sounds like a timing thing, and not your skill level...
    ...RR is a great trail and I find myself going way too fast on that trail.

    A BMX style rider is going to manual them, if your on an AM rig, speed and the steepness of the downhill tends to wave more towards timing air.

    Just my nickel

    When the HCGA guys fire up the Friday night pasta rides near Wilkes Barre come join us...
    ...lots of ROCKS, and Hops!

    ^There are a few HCGA threads on here^ search them out and view them. Lots of rocky pics.

  3. #3
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    My friend taco'd the bejesus out of his front wheel there. I think you need to go fast enough to land on the backside of the second hump in certain spots- I lack both the skill and cojones to do such a thing though
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  4. #4
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    Thanks for the response. I've got some pump track and DJ riding on the docket to improve in this area of riding. I'm from Michigan, and don't really have a trail of that style to practice on.

    I looked up HCGA, and it looks like some interesting terrain there. If I happen through the area around one of those rides, I'll stop in.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by XJaredX View Post
    My friend taco'd the bejesus out of his front wheel there. I think you need to go fast enough to land on the backside of the second hump in certain spots- I lack both the skill and cojones to do such a thing though
    I can see that. I run heavier wheels, which may have saved me from the same fate.

    For me, I made it through a few of the rollers, with body and bike position out of whack, until I finally got knocked off my line. The tire washed out in the loose, sharp rocks on the downslope side, and those rocks left a nice scar in my right knee. I got up, got over confident again, and did the same thing, but ended up just running up against the backslope side of the trail second time around.

    You kinda have to ride it out, once you're into it. Braking there will mean a hard endo, and if that's the option, I'll take the slide every time.

  6. #6
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    Go fast. If your nervous you can always manual push down versus riding fresh and cleaning them.

  7. #7
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  8. #8
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    I don't think it's necessarily you, its improper trail design. I have a friend that works at the ranger station and nearly every call they get for a downed biker is from that trail and I'd venture to guess its on those sections. I've nearly done the same (several times) and have seen a buddy endo in those rollers. It's best to just slow down for them.

  9. #9
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    They seem to be rather evenly spaced, I would venture it's more "going faster than your skill level" that tends to cause the crashes there.
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  10. #10
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    I ride a lot at Raystown. Can't picture the exact location you're speaking of, but multiple sections exist throughout the trail network where you really have to keep it in check or things get nasty quick. I pump a lot of the sections where if I were to air it out, I'd land on the upslope of the next roller. I also pre-jump a lot of the rollers where I load up the suspension then unload it/bunny hop over the lip landing on the backside/downslope. Everyone has their own technique. I'm sure airing it out and jumping them as doubles is do-able for a select few. When riding Ridge Trail I often think how Richie Schley or Cedric Gracia would ride the 'Bumps Ahead' section. I picture them just killing them while whipping out the back end in the process.

  11. #11
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    I think I know which ones you're talking about. Work on a pump track will help you be able to take that at speed. Pre-jumping is good too; it's what DH racers will do if they can't launch off something because there's no landing or another obstacle too soon. Rumor has it that during the first Transylvania Epic Ben Cruz of California tripled that feature on Ray's Revenge.
    Brought to you by rocks.

  12. #12
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    I would have to agree that the issue with that section has nothing to do with poor trail design and more to do with people letting their speed get away from them. I tend to prejump or really keep my speed a bit more in check through this area.

    I have seen a bunch of people eat it here. Lots with new collar bone bumps as a bonus. However, most of these people were guys in sneakers or a t-shirt or something else that identified them as a super noob. Not that there is anything wrong with that, but the nature of some of the Ray's trails allows for you to pick up speed pretty quick without thinking about it. This is one of the things that makes it fun for a more experinced rider, but also makes it dangerous for someone less aware of their limits.

  13. #13
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    I thought it was just me. I crashed a borrowed Pivot Mach 5.7 at Dirtfest last year on that section. On a later trip on my Ventana Ciclon, I got dangerously out of sorts with my weight shifting forward after a few humps, but managed to save it. I blamed it on suspension set up, but it was likely just technique. No dropper post kept me from getting back far enough.

  14. #14
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    Disagree with the comment of "poor trail design", and insist on pilot error.
    Having ridden Ray's R. a # of times, and had the beejeezus scared outta me by those rollers.
    Most are well-spaced, a few are tight, all have major side-hill exposure. One right-hander has a big-azzed vine
    that's reached out to grab my bars tossing me like a rag-a-muffin off into the abyss.

    Part of Dirtfest's allure is while drinking microbrews to hear, and relive all the crash-tastic tales.
    So... checkidity, check yourself - before you wreck yourself.
    The best is the one you want to ride most often..

  15. #15
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    to the improper trail design people: so, say, when you have to dab on a log or rock garden, is that improper trail design too?

    totally not tryin' to troll here, just pointing something out.

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