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  1. #1
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    Missing the bike but....

    The BC skiing is incredible,kicking gliding and cutting some beautiful turns.BC is as close as it gets to MTN biking, keeps the legs,arms and lungs fine tuned for spring!

  2. #2
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by readingracing
    The BC skiing is incredible,kicking gliding and cutting some beautiful turns.BC is as close as it gets to MTN biking, keeps the legs,arms and lungs fine tuned for spring!
    Agreed!

    Great workout for the body & mind...

  3. #3
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    Back Country skiing? Is that what that means? Are you flattening down the trails so we can ride on them?

  4. #4
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    Wish it was as easy as that,still up to my knees.pray we don't see whats been predicted for early March,be lucky to see dirt before April,but in the mean time ski's and snow shoes.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by readingracing
    The BC skiing is incredible,kicking gliding and cutting some beautiful turns.BC is as close as it gets to MTN biking, keeps the legs,arms and lungs fine tuned for spring!
    You said it Dane! Where you been skiing?

  6. #6
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    Nolde and mostly Antietam.

  7. #7
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    Nolde Forest Map

    I got a quick kick & glide in at Wyomissing park after work today.
    I found this Nolde forest map on line. I hope to hit it again this weekend.

    http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/statepar...orest_mini.pdf
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  8. #8
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    I never skied and I don't own ski's, so I guess I'm gonna have to stick to the road riding on the 47 lb. DH bike for now!!! That should keep me fit,huh?

  9. #9
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    Do you think that if me and a couple of others strapped boards to our feet and walked the same loop over and over, we would be able to ride it soon?

  10. #10
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    Surely you jest,invest in a BC ski package,you don't know what your missing.

  11. #11
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    Been back country snowboarding for the last several weeks. Have some great lines and jumps built. Miss the bikes, but all this snow is pretty fun too.

  12. #12
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    I'm laid off since new years eve! I bought a new mountain bike and can't sell my old one to even make up the difference to pay for it yet. I can't afford the ski's right now! unfortunately. Plus I'm looking to buy Fred's seat post. I'm gonna have to build up my endurance on the road for the next couple of weeks. Road riding should help me build up my legs and stamina plus I've been making a commitment to ride in harder gears than I used to. I only rode 7 miles on the road yesterday but I pushed a hard gear the whole time and pushed myself hard. Oh, I didn't really take the DH, bike I took the Remedy.

  13. #13
    ganginwood
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    i don't see the correlation between bc/xc skiing and mt biking. in fact, the reason i ski is because it is so much different than biking and i need the mental rest.
    just wondering what you see so similar between the 2 sports?

    they both get me out in the woods, if thats what you mean.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Aswell
    the 5th poster, ganginwoods, is correct

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ganginwood
    i don't see the correlation between bc/xc skiing and mt biking. in fact, the reason i ski is because it is so much different than biking and i need the mental rest.
    just wondering what you see so similar between the 2 sports?

    they both get me out in the woods, if thats what you mean.
    Uses the same muscle groups, and is the same cardio workout as riding.
    Like MTB, XC skiing is a good balance of fitness, and technical skill.
    Can be done on the same trails, and some that are unaccessable on MTB.
    Uphill work is rewarded by downhill fun.
    Need more? I could probably come up with a few

  15. #15
    ganginwood
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPark
    Like MTB, XC skiing is a good balance of fitness, and technical skill.
    like sex?
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Aswell
    the 5th poster, ganginwoods, is correct

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ganginwood
    i don't see the correlation between bc/xc skiing and mt biking.
    Both activities are gravity sports involving an unnatural form of human terrestrial locomotion.

    Both activities will begin to feel natural after spending enough time at it.

    Both activities utilize state of the art materials and engineering in the construction of the required equipment, and yet can be equally enjoyable on old-school gear.

    For both activities, the yin and yang of equipment manufacturer is stiffness and flexibility.

    Both activities require a certain amount of strength and fitness on the uphills, and can be an intense thrill on the downhills.

    Both activities require skills and techniques learned through repetition and the development of muscle memory.

    Both activities are well-suited to the same terrain and trail systems, and are best done in the mountains.

    Aside from that, they're not the least bit similar!

  17. #17
    ganginwood
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    so do you consider cycling to be a "weight bearing" activity?
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Aswell
    the 5th poster, ganginwoods, is correct

  18. #18
    Can't feel my legs
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    Quote Originally Posted by ganginwood
    so do you consider cycling to be a "weight bearing" activity?
    Not sure what you're asking here, but, if you are asking if it's more like running/hiking, then I would say that if it is, you're doing it wrong.
    When done properly, an XC stride should recruit the same muscle groups in a way that is very similar to cycling, with little to no impact on the joints.

  19. #19
    ganginwood
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    i'd argue the opposite to be true. weight-bearing muscles contract eccentrically to control the slide and then concentrically to accelerate it. this pattern is repeated thousands of times to produce the kick and glide. cycling has no weight bearing qualities in the pedal stroke, or should i say...lacks most weight bearing qualities.

    my biggest observation regarding comments such as those above is that it can be said when comparing almost anything to biking. for example...

    "Both activities will begin to feel natural after spending enough time at it.

    Both activities utilize state of the art materials and engineering in the construction of the required equipment, and yet can be equally enjoyable on old-school gear.

    For both activities, the yin and yang of equipment manufacturer is stiffness and flexibility.

    Both activities require a certain amount of strength and fitness on the uphills, and can be an intense thrill on the downhills.

    Both activities require skills and techniques learned through repetition and the development of muscle memory.

    Both activities are well-suited to the same terrain and trail systems, and are best done in the mountains."

    4 out of 6 of these comments can be applied to golf.

    of course i'm playing devils advocate but couldn't help the comparisons.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Aswell
    the 5th poster, ganginwoods, is correct

  20. #20
    ganginwood
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    as per the other posts...

    dually noted. skiing is a great workout, its a blast to do, and it keeps you fit for spring. but those statements alone won't place it in a paralleled arena to biking.

    yes, i know that you can ski the same trails that you bike on.....
    but most of the trails up here you can also ride an electric wheelchair on as well.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Aswell
    the 5th poster, ganginwoods, is correct

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ganginwood
    i'd argue the opposite to be true. weight-bearing muscles contract eccentrically to control the slide and then concentrically to accelerate it. this pattern is repeated thousands of times to produce the kick and glide. cycling has no weight bearing qualities in the pedal stroke, or should i say...lacks most weight bearing qualities.

    my biggest observation regarding comments such as those above is that it can be said when comparing almost anything to biking. for example...

    "Both activities will begin to feel natural after spending enough time at it.

    Both activities utilize state of the art materials and engineering in the construction of the required equipment, and yet can be equally enjoyable on old-school gear.

    For both activities, the yin and yang of equipment manufacturer is stiffness and flexibility.

    Both activities require a certain amount of strength and fitness on the uphills, and can be an intense thrill on the downhills.

    Both activities require skills and techniques learned through repetition and the development of muscle memory.

    Both activities are well-suited to the same terrain and trail systems, and are best done in the mountains."

    4 out of 6 of these comments can be applied to golf.

    of course i'm playing devils advocate but couldn't help the comparisons.
    Both activities are a metaphor for life's ups and downs, struggles and successes, failures and accomplishments.

    Both activities are best enjoyed if you don't take yourself too seriously.

    A beer tastes best following either activity.

    Neither can be compared to golf because golf sucks.

  22. #22
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    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by tduro
    Both activities are a metaphor for life's ups and downs, struggles and successes, failures and accomplishments.

    Both activities are best enjoyed if you don't take yourself too seriously.

    A beer tastes best following either activity.

    Neither can be compared to golf because golf sucks.
    Moto has lots of up & downs...

    Moto is more like MTB...

    Electro Moto is even better!

    Golf?................... not so much... LOL


    ride

  23. #23
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    Just got back from a nice xc ski, I agree completely, Mt. biking and XC skiIng are very similar. I have read a couple Mt. bike, and cycling magazine articles that have supported xc skiing as an excellent means of cross training in the off season. It incorporates some of the key components used in cycling: Balance, strength, rhythm, and flexibility. It also uses upper body elements which help cyclist keep this area fit, and enhance stability on the bike.
    And, as all things are benefited by a solid core, Core strength is an absolute for XC. The added bonus of getting outdoors in the short winter days I'd be indoors at a gym has me hooked.

  24. #24
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    ganginwood,maybe you should come and ski the mtn bike trails in the neck of our woods,definitely not electric wheelchair friendly,where in Pa do you live with such mild trails?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by mt.Pulaski
    ... has me hooked.
    Good point. I forgot that one.

    Both activities are powerfully addictive! And the power of the addiction increases exponentially with frequency of participation. I've skiied 11 of the last 12 days. Now once a day just isn't enough!

  26. #26
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    I just got back from a road ride on my 29er,boy did it feel good!!!

  27. #27
    ganginwood
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    mtp:
    i'm agreeing with everyone that its a great x training platform.......if i had to guess i have about 40 skis in so far this year (that would obviuosly be lift served, and bc combined).
    but what i'm saying is that for me they are completely opposite which is why i love them both so dearly.

    on my bike...its that white intensity glow, an annarobic effort that never seems to end. i often lose the visuals and sight of where i'm at and take what i'm doing for granted. i obviously love the intensity and the sport but i can only do it for so many months out of the year before i need to mentally recover. biking gets old really fast when it becomes a structured program or even remotely emulates one

    but while i'm skiing that doesn't seem to happen. sure i'll rev the anarobic engine up a bit to blow out some carbon, its always fun to take scalps. but i go out there to experience the float, glide and visuals that i never get while biking. if i choose to ski a trail, it carries very little of the charachteristics that i've grown familiar to while biking during a warmer season

    the physical attributes that everyone has mentioned can be extracted from a multiplicity of activites but they scarcely resemble what skiing can bring to the table and have little to do with biking.

    and as tduro stated....they are both fun and deserve a few amber colored nutrient rich beverages as a reward for the effort.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Aswell
    the 5th poster, ganginwoods, is correct

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by ganginwood
    the physical attributes that everyone has mentioned can be extracted from a multiplicity of activites but they scarcely resemble what skiing can bring to the table and have little to do with biking.
    And yet you didn't ask about a correlation to any of those other activities. You asked specifically about the correlation between skiing and cycling. IMO the responses you received correlated very well to the question you asked.

  29. #29
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    Missing the bike but....

    Quote Originally Posted by tduro
    And yet you didn't ask about a correlation to any of those other activities. You asked specifically about the correlation between skiing and cycling. IMO the responses you received correlated very well to the question you asked.
    Agreed tduro! There are so many aspects of any given sport that will carry over to mt biking. I feel that all the responses correlated very well to the question that was originally asked!
    Waging war on my pedals every chance I get!!!

  30. #30
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    I used to trail-run frequently, to supplement my MTB'ing (until my back complained too much). Although the 2 are very different, there's no doubt each helped the other. I don't think golf would help either, though.

  31. #31
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    quickly...'cause on my way to the telefest @denton.

    i meant that most skiers love the sport because of the float and weightless transition between turns. both are impossible to replicate on 2 wheels.because you need skis to do so.
    my post delivers the opposite ends of the spectrum between the 2. complications of the written text i suppose

    again....just playing devils advocate.

  32. #32
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    Dude,if your a resort skier I agree it doesn't replicate,I'm talkin BC you work for your ground and I quote myself "it's as close as it get's".what I ride I ski,up,down, in-between,maybe if you actually tried it you would agree!

  33. #33
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    Wink

    I agree

    Resort skiing is, like resort Mt biking!

    Free ride up, Free ride down!

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by ganginwood
    quickly...'cause on my way to the telefest @denton.

    i meant that most skiers love the sport because of the float and weightless transition between turns.

    I think we are talking about two different kinds of skiing. whatever? have fun.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by readingracing
    Dude,if your a resort skier I agree it doesn't replicate,I'm talkin BC you work for your ground and I quote myself "it's as close as it get's".what I ride I ski,up,down, in-between,maybe if you actually tried it you would agree!
    I finally tried Mt. Penn on skis this morning, and had a blast! Followed some tracks (presumably yours), and made some of our own. When we started, the surface was so frozen that we hardly made tracks. It was surprisingly fast and easy to cruise through untracked snow, barely scratching the surface. Downhills were a little sketchy until it warmed up and the surface softened. Great stuff out there!

  36. #36
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    How much is a set of cheap skis and poles and whatever else I would need to start xc skiing?
    Last edited by mtnbkerkonadawgdeluxepaul; 02-20-2010 at 03:02 PM.

  37. #37
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    Perfect conditions!

    I also hit Mt Penn this afternoon. Great conditions throughout the trail system and off trail.

    The snow was as perfect as I can ever remember.

    Looking forward to Blue Marsh tommrorow Tduro!
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  38. #38
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    Cheap ski set

    Paul,

    This is probably as cheap as you will find to get started.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=300399455456
    Last edited by bbohr; 02-20-2010 at 06:38 PM.
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  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbohr
    Paul,

    This is probably as cheap as you will find to get started.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/NEW-139-COMPLETE...item439d7858d6
    Just bought a similiar starter setup, can't stand all the pics of people out in the woods anymore....... I'm gonna see what it's all about. (I mostly blame JeffSkis).

  40. #40
    ganginwood
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    and what is your set up?
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Aswell
    the 5th poster, ganginwoods, is correct

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by ganginwood
    and what is your set up?

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...=STRK:MEWAX:IT

    I think it should be good enough to start with?

  42. #42
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    Thanks bbohr for the ski set picture! I am now really lookin to get a set to ski! My wife will love this one! Maybe I should just go up in the woods and shovel the 2 feet plus of snow off the trails so I can bike!

  43. #43
    ganginwood
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    if the coverage is low and you want to do xc type skiing like your watching in the olympics and ski mostly on snow covered roads, those will be perfect.

    if the coverage increases and you want to ski on the trails....they will be mediocre at best. leather boots aren't a good choice for turns.

    when the coverage is good and you want to make turns and throw some low angle tree shots in there...plus some additional meadow skipping aka touring for turns, those skis aren't going to cut it.

    it all depends on the application. UNLIKE biking, skiing is very gear specific. on a bike you can ride your ht or fs bike on any trail and at least blend in. gears or no gears you can still manage to keep up with your buddies. skiing isn't like that at all. nothing exposes your weakness, lack of athleticism, or bad gear selection like skiing. it can be very humbling when your starting out.
    those skis will get you out in the woods and youl'll have fun on them. and for the price you can't beat it. but ultimately you'll want to be in a plastic excursion class boot.

    you be the judge. give us a report on your ski on the mtb trails. my guess....you'll kick and glide ok, but as soon as you go to turn them between the trees, even on the trail, you'll struggle.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Aswell
    the 5th poster, ganginwoods, is correct

  44. #44
    ganginwood
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    wyatt,here's some photos from today with the wife in potter county, all lake effect snow. none of this would have been any fun on anything less than plastic boots and 80mm under the waist

    we did have skinnier skis on earlier in the day but there is no comparrison on what you can do with the right set-up. albiet, this is the closest to mtbing.....in my eyes,true bc skiing. earning your turns.

    what you have is fine for starting out. but you'll find out in time, what you want to do in the woods and the gear you need. you're next purchase will be based on experience. these however are just my recommendations. i'm sure the core xc skiers will chime in with better recommendations for gear.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Missing the bike but....-imgp1383.jpg  

    Missing the bike but....-imgp1387.jpg  

    Missing the bike but....-imgp1395.jpg  

    Missing the bike but....-imgp1397.jpg  

    Missing the bike but....-imgp1372.jpg  

    Last edited by ganginwood; 02-21-2010 at 04:49 PM.

  45. #45
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    Is turning in BC-XC skiing similar to Alpine turns?

  46. #46
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    the bigger difference is bc to xc type skiing. when i think of xc...i think of skinny skis on grassy roads or sticking to mtb trails.

    when i think of bc skiing...i imagine kicking out to your destination, then skiing, skinning, or herringboning to the top. pilots choice.

    pick your line carefully on the way down and smile. it looks more graceful going down.
    ski out your stash and kick to the new destination. repeat as necessary.

    as for the turns...whatever works. there's no science or thought to it. its stupid fun.

    if i'm in a bad situation, i'll throw a p turn in there to get out of trouble or more often than not....grab a tree. alpine usually means your heel is fixed to the ski, thats about it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Aswell
    the 5th poster, ganginwoods, is correct

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by ganginwood
    wyatt,here's some photos from today with the wife in potter county, all lake effect snow. none of this would have been any fun on anything less than plastic boots and 80mm under the waist

    we did have skinnier skis on earlier in the day but there is no comparrison on what you can do with the right set-up. albiet, this is the closest to mtbing.....in my eyes,true bc skiing. earning your turns.

    what you have is fine for starting out. but you'll find out in time, what you want to do in the woods and the gear you need. you're next purchase will be based on experience. these however are just my recommendations. i'm sure the core xc skiers will chime in with better recommendations for gear.
    nice pics, that looks a lot more serious than what I had in mind. But I might really enjoy it and eventually get into that kinda stuff, who knows?

  48. #48
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    Even after reading up on all of it I can't figure out the difference between Telemark, Alpine, XC and Back Country skis.

    When I'm watching the Olympics, I see guys who do what I would call XC skiing. Heel lifts up.

    Then I see guys on downhill skiis, heel is fixed.

    Then I see guys doing XC style courses on fixed heel skiis...Ski Skates?

    I'm so confused.

  49. #49
    ganginwood
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    and you forgot randonee AT. that's where you're on alpine gear but the heel can separate from the binder so you can climb/tour. once on top, you lock the heel back in place to make your p turns on the way down. its a way for alpine skiers to be able to participate in bc tours without having to go to tele gear.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Aswell
    the 5th poster, ganginwoods, is correct

  50. #50
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    pppb, here's what I know.

    - Alpine - downhill only (really); big solid boots, wide skis, fixed bindings; think DH MTB
    - Telemark - no clue
    - Back Country - XC skiis that are shorter/wider with metal edges, bigger & more-stiff boots to better support foot/ankle/turns and protect you; boots have good outsole for walking off-ski; think All-Mountain MTB
    - XC - narrow/longest skiis most suitable for groomed/tracked areas; short maybe softer boots; think Road Bike

    disclaimer: I have *one* day on XC skiis, and numerous on Alpine, and zilch on anything else. People please feel free to correct me!

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