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  1. #1
    Shrinking Clyde Rider :-)
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    How do you define a good bike?

    I have a Speacialized FSRxc that is coming up on two years old this May. In my opinion have had to replace too many components on this bike. I am starting to question if this was bike a good purchase.
    Last edited by tturbotom; 03-30-2008 at 06:40 PM.

  2. #2
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    Can davidson win?

    what comps have you replaced and why? need examples man

  3. #3
    don't tread on me
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    It sounds like it was not a good bike for you. Note the qualifier. Specialized bikes are generally considered "good" bikes. I had a C-dale F1000 hardtail - xt group, lefty with electric lockout, light AL frame - a good bike. Not so for me - I bent it in less than 3months and would torque the rear wheel out of the drops on occaision. Then again I'm solidly in the Clydesdale range. I had to go bigger travel and full squish to gett a durable steed. I run nice bikes now but good would certainly suffice - especially with the advances in tech. Examine your dislikes about the Spec and talk with a few shops to find the bike that fulfills the need.

  4. #4
    Ride da mOOn Moderator
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    Good job!

    TT:

    You are def a 29er candidate... You should have asked me to ride mine the other day on the ride. I didn't know you were shopping for a bike! Come to FS on a Tuesday and you can take my Redline Mono 9 for a spin. It's rigid and you will want a squish fork, but you can get the idea of the 29er concept.

    Go Hardtail 29er/Made of Nice Steel or 29er full squish...Many to choose from!


    Team Big Dog... Off the Porch and Chas'in ya!



  5. #5
    Shrinking Clyde Rider :-)
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    I am not shopping for another bike. I'm just frustrated that crap keeps breaking. It's not like I bought a $300-400 Walmart bike. I dropped a decent coin (from an average working persons point of veiw) on this bike.

    I am a 6'3" ish Clyde and and ride semi-aggressive XC. I have an X-large bike. Common sense tells me that if someone is getting an X-Large bike the that the components should support the rider. Taller people "typically" weight more than shorter people.

    The wheel set has been an issue since almost the begining. I relaced the rear wheel within the first year because I was tired of replacing broken spokes. They would even break while riding on paved roads. I replaced the free hub in 2007. A few weeks ago I replaced (upgraded) the wheel set because the rear hub took a dump.

    Today I broke the rear shock linkage. This is something I never would have thought would break.

    I thought for sure that I would be replacing the actual shocks (front fork or rear) before something like this.

    I have replaced other things (rear derailluer, cassettes, chains, chain rings, etc ) as well, but I attribute these things to normal wear and tear.

  6. #6
    Ride da mOOn Moderator
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    Good job!

    TT:

    Now you know why I ride Rigid and Single Speed with Cable Brakes. Even though I do my own work... Less to break! Just wanna Ride!

  7. #7
    don't tread on me
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    Yeah, I feel your pain on the wheels - xt hubs and I don't get along for mtb use - I went thru 2 freehubs in as many years on my AC2, but they work fine on my cx bike. After my 2nd blowout I went DT Swiss and haven't looked back.
    You're not the 1st to blow thru linkage parts on Spec. FSR bikes - a buddy of mine cracks linkages and loses pivot bolts like no ones business. The inherent lateral flex of a horst link four bar has some of the blame. Who knows if parts were torqued to spec. My Ellsworth Moment frame pivots loosened up noticeably after the first 2 rides - obviously not torqued to spec at the factory.
    You're right on the cost/satisfaction deal. You spent a chunk and so far, it hasn't lived up to durability expectations. I'd be annoyed too.

  8. #8
    Tough Guy Extraordinaire
    Reputation: Shmack's Avatar
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    How often are you riding and what type of trails?

    I have a very nicely equiped SC Superlight, what I would consider a 'nice' bike. I replace parts with fairly often and my setup is only a year old. The important fact is how much and how hard you ride. I ride 2 to 3 times a week, mostly in the Wissahickon. If I only road every other week or something like that I would be more upset.

    If you use it a lot, it will wear faster. The is even more true if you are a bigger guy. I'm not huge, but I am bigger than the other guys I ride with and I replace parts more often.

    As an example, here is a list of what I have replaced in the last year from wear. I have replaced some other items, but these have been upgrades.

    2 or 3 chains
    1 cassette
    2 chainrings
    many tires
    cables

  9. #9
    Shrinking Clyde Rider :-)
    Reputation: tturbotom's Avatar
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    During the warmer months I try to get out at least twice a week on my MTBike. In the colder months I try to get out at least once a week. I logged over 1000 miles the first year I had my bike. It is safe to say that number has increase a lot since then. I ride what I call semi aggressive XC. The trails are usually littered with log-overs, rock gardens and roots. I am not one to do big drops. The 1' drops at French Creek are about the biggest I have done. I am not race ready, but I think I can hold my own.

    I have gone through the same amount of these parts:
    2 or 3 chains
    1 cassette
    2 chainrings
    many tires
    cables

    Now add:
    replaced derailluer (bent it, considered normal wear IMO)
    replaced bushing in rear shock (normal wear IMO)
    relaced rear wheel (once in first year)
    replaced wheelset
    broken shock lingage

  10. #10
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    Lee, Are you sitting there impatently waiting for my reply?

    Anyway, What I'm seeing there are typical issues really. The wheels supplied are generally OK for the average rider on the average terrain. Those are something all of us Clydes are going to have to replace. The linkage isn't "typical", but it will happen to someone eventually. In this case, you were the unlucky one. Derailleurs are going to go eventually.
    Would you consider a Hardtail? Less flex in the back, and no bushings or bearings to replace. ttyl, Fahn

  11. #11
    Ride da mOOn Moderator
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    Good job!

    TT:

    That's not that bad considering we ride in PA. I notice you haven't mentioned fork or shock problems such as leakage or seals which makes you a lucky guy! You can expect to replace the stuff that takes the most abuse, Hence in the dirt and mud the most: Tires, Rims, R. Derailers, Cables, Chains, Cogs, Suspension Pivots are considered maintenance items. Stuff like Frames, Linkage, Forks shouldn't have catastrophic breakage!!!!!!!!!!

    I end up replacing everything maintenance worthy on my bike throughout the year. I clean and lube/service my chain and cogs often. It's not fun, but needs to be done, besides it saves money and adds to performance. On other pre ride days I lube my cables. This will save lot's and it needs to be done for performance to be crisp. Learn to true your wheels and do it a few times a year, it's not that hard, and you don't need to go nuts just a quarter or half turn most of the time is all they need. A straw from a WD 40 can and a little duct tape makes a great(cheap) truing guide taped to a forkleg or chainstay.

    If you plan on keeping your bike or buy a new bike buy extra:
    Normal:
    Tires
    Tubes
    Chain and quick link
    Rear Cog
    Fr Chainrings
    Cables(inners)
    Brake Pads
    Grips
    Note Replace new all three: chain, cog, and ch rings at the same time

    Not so Normal:
    Wheel Bearings
    Bottom Bracket Bearings
    Rear Hub Cog Carrier

    Support your LBS... They can help with many things. Ask for a few extra spokes and nipples to fit your wheels.

    The Key is not to ruin rides due to maintenance failures out on the trail. Crashes and accidents can't be helped especially since you ride with Super Heros... LOL!

  12. #12
    Shrinking Clyde Rider :-)
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    The linkage and the wheels are the things that have me most annoyed, but then again they have both caused me serious problems within weeks of each other. The other stuff listed are things I would expect to replace. I have wondered if a hardtail may have been a better choice, but since I took the plunge on a full suspension I can't afford to go back. At least not at the moment.

    The rear shock and fork seem to be holding up just fine, knock on wood. I'm actually suprised they have not gave me any problems yet. I am sure they will both blow out on my next ride now that I mention it. :-P

    I try to maintain my bike the best I can. I always lube the joins, shocks, and chain. I clean the chain as well as any other necessary parts as needed . I check the bolts to make sure they are not coming loose. I always check the spokes and axles to make sure everything is in proper working order.

    I hope to soon ride through this moment of constant breakage. Wish me luck.

  13. #13
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    we are close in size and have similar riding styles, the 29r (like Iverson) is not the answer for everyone (not even the nuggets), it sounds more like a string of bad luck, then a cursed bike. The broken linkage sounds like the only anomaly. We all spend for upkeep and will no matter the wheel diameter.

    things i go through every:

    6 months:
    tires
    gloves
    cleats

    12 months
    tires
    chain
    cables
    grips
    shoes / cleats

    18 to 24month
    cassette
    front rings
    chain
    cables
    break piston pads
    rear deral pulleys
    bushings

    3 years+
    rotors
    break cables
    derals (however with good maintenance techniques they can last 10 years)

    4 years
    wheel set (only good maintenance gets them this far)
    pedals

    5 to 7 years +
    new frame depending on weld hold and cracks
    new fork / shock

    good luck.

  14. #14
    ganginwood
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    all normal wear and tear. at 6' 3" and a clydesdale, i'd say its par for the course. you might want to invest in a set of crossmax wheels with straight pull zicral spokes. they are not cheap but i've run them for the past 8 years and have never trued a spoke nor had an issues with cracking rims. i'm much smaller than you (155 pounds) but ride aggressively and abuse my ****. there has been times where i snapped 2 spokes on the same wheel and they never came out of true. i continued using the wheel for a month until i got down to the shop. they make several models, and with your dimensions i wouldn't recommend the slr's. you might even consider the through axle option with the sx. that might give you some lateral stability to relieve unwanted pressure on the rim. i'm not saying mavic makes the best wheels, but there is something to be said about a mavic build.
    as to your original question.....most bikes at that level are pretty much the same. if the fit is there....its a good bike.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Aswell
    the 5th poster, ganginwoods, is correct

  15. #15
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    Less Bike more skill... It's easy to blame the ride... A lot of time it is riding smoother, flowin better through the trail rather than hacking your way through... All parts take a beating on a mountain bike regardless of your size... They are almost all wearable items... It's part of the sport... I have found that the more expensive $hit breaks even quicker... I ride deore so I don't cry each time I bust something... Go singlespeed fully rigid and limit the crap that can go wrong... You'll be a better man because of it!!!

  16. #16
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    TT...I actually scaled DOWN this year, as you saw on the ride as I feel personally, that I don't need a full suspension bike for the way I ride.

    However, look at Lee's option, the 29er way seems to be the way, either in a 1x 9 or SS. Might take some getting used to. Not to be a salesman here, but I set Lee up with all of his and a bunch of guys down here on the Downhill bikes..so again..might be an option worth considering.

    Kev

  17. #17
    Ride da mOOn Moderator
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    Wink

    Kev/TT:

    Agreed, with the 29er you can always take your tech up a level by riding stuff that a 26er could not ever even think of! More and more Steel Rigid 29ers are winning races! So it's not about the trail getting rough it's about improvement of the breed. Look at motorcycles they come in all wheel sizes to fit different people. Adult bicycle makers are just finding that out.

    Gotta be the feel of steel though, Alu just doesn't cut it, Harsh ride in hardtail form! With a clydesdale on board Alu. just "cracks" due to the non forgiveness of the tubing as we have all seen. Road bikes use carbon stays and forks... Why? They give! Absorb shock and allow for flex. As for wheels with Alu spokes, they are stiff, but they break faster than stainless steel spokes which are more ductal.

    No "whining" here just riding stuff others with 26ers wish they could ride.

    Kev: I need to get "Intense" but "Nik" could be another "DH" choice... Might mean having to ride a Scorpa/Yamaha though... LOL! The boys are restless... I got yelled at again for suggesting the "Fly" to allow a little riding uphill.. they told me if it has more than 9 gears it won't fit in the Race Rig!

    Guess I gotta stock up on Yamahaitus, Yamatoe and Yamathumb first aid...



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  18. #18
    Shrinking Clyde Rider :-)
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    Being relatively new to the sport (3 years and counting), I am starting to feel the painful truth about the costs involved in riding. I guess I need ot suck it up and deal. Or make my own parts that won't break as often. :-)

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEPMTBA
    Agreed, with the 29er you can always take your tech up a level by riding stuff that a 26er could not ever even think of!...
    More and more Steel Rigid 29ers are winning races!...
    No "whining" here just riding stuff others with 26ers wish they could ride...
    Lee
    It's "LAME" bait (not "flame" bait) when thrown out there by a 29er rider...

    Fahn

  20. #20
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    Larry....um...I don't get the point here. Not to start anything, but please stay ON TOPIC. No bash fest please, we have a legitimate topic going and there is no need to bring up the 29er/26er BS. Right now in the industry, which I am PART of, the 29er is driving the sales in a big way. They are winning races, and customers as well as I have sold 12 of them since the 20th of March...so...something is up.

    Maybe you have had a problem with them or don't know how to ride one. If you need assistance with learning, I suggest you contact someone at Hubbard for instructions on how to handle a real bike. No sarcasimn intended...but all of us here have assisted Tom in answering his questions and I don't appreciate you hijacking a thread because you don't like 29'ers. I myself don't personally ride one..I perfer the 26inch version...Hardtail..Aluminum..suits me fine. We're just trying to help someone.

    Ok Tom...sorry...and to reply to your last post..."Welcome to the Money Pit"..or as Lee says when he see's something new and shiny...."You Buy??" See you on the next ride!...maybe this weeks downhill???

    Kevin

  21. #21
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    Larry Speaking of Whiners is one of those Bit#$es that if the 29er was around first and the next big thing was 26ers he'd have something lame to say about it too... It's about personal preference and a number or reasons to choose 26 over 29... Your riding style, types of terrain you hit, stunts, etc, etc... Larry, please place your nookie back in your mouth and set the baby in for a nap... Peace all... Sorry for Rant but this dude is always out to ruin a good topic...

  22. #22
    mtbr member
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    Thank You Sir. Also, .as a professional businessman and Mt. Biker, I think Larry, you are doing Hubbard a disservice with your 29'er signiature. I thought we were supposed to be in this together? You are invoking controversy with the tag and that will only bring a heap of scorn on you and your club. From what I understand Hubbard has many 29er's on the mountain. You would be best to treat all riders with courtesy regardless of what they ride.

    End of subject.

    Kevin

  23. #23
    Wizard of the Trail
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    Guys, you need to lighten up. You make Larry sound like some type of 29er bike nazi. I have nothing but respect for this guy for taking me and my nephew out to the trails. Maybe he likes to break balls, but jeez give him a break.
    There is no charge for awesomeness......or attractiveness.

    Good rep does not wash out the bad, nor the bad the good.

  24. #24
    Ride da mOOn Moderator
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by LarryFahn
    Lee
    It's "LAME" bait (not "flame" bait) when thrown out there by a 29er rider...

    Fahn
    Larry:

    With over 40 years of experience riding all types of wheeled vehicles I didn't "BAIT" anyone, I just stated the facts from my point of view on riding a 26 vs a 29 since I ride both and to help TT with his thread questions. I feel a 29er would be to his benefit and it is his decision weather he goes for one or rides what he has I am always willing to help.
    I love my 29ers and they work great for me, that's all that matters when the handlebars are in my hands... I RIDE... let's do more of that!

  25. #25
    Wizard of the Trail
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    Your full crap Lee! I am still waiting for my bushings and dogbone!!! Just kiddin Lee! About the crap part. LOL
    There is no charge for awesomeness......or attractiveness.

    Good rep does not wash out the bad, nor the bad the good.

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