• 05-20-2011
    alkemyst
    Yet Another Dog Bike Thread - not planning on trails, just leisure riding...help!
    Anyone try the Springer, the Walky or AFitDog's Bike Buddy products?

    My job has changed so I am no longer getting home in time to get my dog to the dog park. My knee is no good (I will be scheduling surgery next year) so running is out. Walking doesn't do it for him. He's a 2 year old Austrailan Cattle Dog.

    I plan to ride off the beaten path and not doing any trail stuff I should be easy riding while he is getting a workout.

    I'd wouldn't mind trying them all and seeing what's best if they were just $20 or so. They are up there, about $80-90 once shipped.

    I have a 2010 Rockhopper SL Pro if that matters at all, Large.

    picture of my partner in crime:
    http://30moons.com/images/oggie/Copilot.jpg

    Action shot: 60lb Hanzo vs 160lb+ Mastiff
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7lnOEFfHUg

    He is a good boy on a leash.
  • 05-20-2011
    CharacterZero
    So you cannot get your dog to follow you without a leash?
  • 05-20-2011
    alkemyst
    Illegal here
  • 05-20-2011
    CharacterZero
    So you cannot outride a cop?

    Just kidding...

    Good luck, and post up a review of whatever you choose!
  • 05-20-2011
    dirtdiva
    I have two Catahoula Leopard Dogs. They are 65 pound cattle dogs and have that crazy energy at the beginning of the ride or run. With trial and error, I've found that it's best to start them on a long downhill. Downhill without a leash is best for obvious reasons. After going as fast as they can after you for a several (10-15) minutes, it tends to mellow them out enough to be on the leash for the uphill grind back up.

    If you can, find singletrack that is rarely used and descend it with your dog behind you (off leash). This works for me because when I see oncoming uphill bikers/hikers, I can grab the leash I've draped over my shoulders and put it on the dogs until I continue with the descent. As soon as I get to the fire road to pedal up, the leash goes on. And if they have extra energy left, they help me up a bit ;)

    If you have to use a road, you can still ride downhill with the dog on the leash. You gotta be really careful. Make sure your dog gets the pee/poop out of the way, so, there's no emergency stops while descending on the leash.

    Hope this helps.
  • 05-20-2011
    alkemyst
    this was not helpful at all. For one I live in Florida, we do not have hills really and two I do not plan on risking my dogs or other bikers by taking this to the trails. I don't really think dogs have a place at most trails especially how crowded they get.

    I am looking to tool around my neighborhood and keep myself and dog safe.

    I have to have a leash. The leash laws are being enforced here due to S. Florida's pitbull attacks and idiots. In reality, I wouldn't have my dog off leash where traffic and those that find it fun to try and tag a pet would be.

    Looking for those with experience with leashes and bikes please.
  • 05-20-2011
    dirtdiva
    Geeze, you didn't mention you lived in FL. So much for that...
  • 05-20-2011
    alkemyst
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dirtdiva
    Geeze, you didn't mention you lived in FL. So much for that...

    Shouldn't have mattered. I posted my requirements. I need to leash my dog to my bike somehow and it's only for casual non-trail riding.

    Most of our trails here even if I wanted to take my dog are tight and narrow. Someone coming up fast behind me and my dog has no where to go. At least if I get hit I am up in the air a bit already, not getting literally turned into a "stump jump" :)

    At the dog park I go to there were a couple guys that have retired their dogs from the trails around here for that reason and sadly with our rednecks around here one felt they purposely plowed into his dog because "your dog is gay anyway".

    It would be cool with everyone could just go out and have fun, but even walking my dog around here people swerve up on the swales and blow stop signs as I am crossing. Even the school crosswalks are not immune.
  • 05-20-2011
    chuky
    We have a walky dog for urban dog/bike adventures. It is pretty low quality material, but seems to work just fine, though make sure you have a cheap seatpost to mount it on. Ideally, you have a harness designed for pulling when using it, or it can cause neck issues for your dog - our herding dog pulls like crazy when on the walky dog. Makes for some pretty fast "casual rides" and is harder on her feet than when we have her off leash on trails.

    Cheers,
    C
  • 05-20-2011
    playpunk
    You could always try a bikejoring setup. There's a good article on the clicker-training website about teaching a dog to pull on command. I live in a rural enough area that I can get my dogs out to the trails once or twice a week unleashed... It stinks that you can't.

    My herding dog mutt is an awesome mountain bike dog - she just runs right by my back wheel, only stopping to poop (off the trail, of course.)

    Sorry this is a bit off topic. Google Bikejoring or Scooterjoring, and there are some good setups for dogs that need serious exercise.
  • 05-20-2011
    GlazedHam
    You absolutely do not want to tie the dog to the bike. You want a retractable 18 ft. leash that you hold in one hand. Also, set your bike up so you can get your feet on the ground with only one hand ...best to have a coaster brake ...which you can get at the local police auction for $5. Carry water for the dog of course. I also carried bags to portage his dumps in.

    You should train your dog to come to a coaches/police whistle or some other really load sound. It sucks to be 5 miles into the woods and unable to find your dog because of some squirrel.

    After your dog is comfortable with this arrangement, you can start taking him offroad, off leash. Some dogs just wont be able to get past chasing squirrels though.
  • 05-20-2011
    alkemyst
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by playpunk
    You could always try a bikejoring setup. There's a good article on the clicker-training website about teaching a dog to pull on command. I live in a rural enough area that I can get my dogs out to the trails once or twice a week unleashed... It stinks that you can't.

    My herding dog mutt is an awesome mountain bike dog - she just runs right by my back wheel, only stopping to poop (off the trail, of course.)

    Sorry this is a bit off topic. Google Bikejoring or Scooterjoring, and there are some good setups for dogs that need serious exercise.

    I will look that up. My dog has learned never to pull on leash with me. My wife still has issues with this (squirrels, other aggressive dogs behind a fence/free, etc), but she thinks commanding is bad.

    To others. A 18' leash would have me really disadvantaged by a dog. My dog comes when I tell him too, he sits when I tell him too, I don't need anything but my voice. (there are asshats in the dog park that blow whistles all day long and their dogs just ignore them...for people that is really annoying).

    I always carry bags and water for my dog.

    In the end I cannot ride with him off-leash. I agree with leash laws for the most part. In my area despite houses being broken into almost every other day, our police are ticketing leash violations.
  • 05-20-2011
    Tegerian
    These folks have some cool dog gear.

    http://www.ruffwear.com/Products/dog_leashes