Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 27
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Blue Bye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    189

    Wow, lightness counts!

    I had an eye opening experience Saturday morning when wheeling around my recently acquired 21 lb carbon fiber hardtail. This is by far the lightest mt bike I've ever ridden and my first ride on it was amazing. I simply could not believe the responsiveness and the speed was far and away greater than I even expected. The accleration also surprised me and at the end of the ride I felt fresher than I do when riding my older bike on the same loop (that bike weights a good 8 lbs more than the hardtail). I completed most of the ride with a huge grin on my face! What a great feeling
    Life is like riding a bicycle - in order to keep your balance, you must keep moving. ~Albert Einstein

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    105
    Now go take that awesome-sauce feeling and apply some reductionist science to it!!! You must be able to prove (scientistically of course) that lighter bike = faster, or it just isn't worth it...

    (/sarcasm)
    Citius. Altius. Fortius.

  3. #3
    Currently in Exile
    Reputation: Frozenspokes's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    2,283
    Going from a squishy bike to a hardtail?
    "There are those who would say there's something pathological about the need to ride, and they're probably on to something. I'd wager though that most of the society-approved compulsions leave deeper scars in the psyche than a need to go and ride a bicycle on a mountain." Cam McRea

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    631
    It does blue bye. As much as going from aluminum to carbon. I went back to riding my carbon 25 and my Scott 29er (great bike) is gathering dust for the time being. And that is paid through the nose to build a sub 20 pounds carbon bike now. It will allow me go further and faster.

  5. #5
    NONDURO
    Reputation: Leopold Porkstacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    6,622
    Lightweight bikes are great. I generally try to save them for personal record uphill time trials and race days, and instead use my 47 pound 32x20 fully rigid beast for my training rides. My average training ride sees 5,000 feet of vertical ascent on a mix of singletrack and fireroads. The wheels weigh about 6 pounds each (Surly Large Marge 65mm wide double-wall rims, shod with 3" wide DH tires), so the rotating mass becomes a weight training tool of sorts. Try to use your heavier bike as much as possible on your regular solo rides, and then when you go on group rides, take your lightweight bike and smoke the crap out of your riding buddies.
    QUOTE from MTBR.COM: You have given out too much Reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later.

  6. #6
    thecentralscrutinizer
    Reputation: mopartodd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    2,447
    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Bye
    I had an eye opening experience Saturday morning when wheeling around my recently acquired 21 lb carbon fiber hardtail. This is by far the lightest mt bike I've ever ridden and my first ride on it was amazing. I simply could not believe the responsiveness and the speed was far and away greater than I even expected. The accleration also surprised me and at the end of the ride I felt fresher than I do when riding my older bike on the same loop (that bike weights a good 8 lbs more than the hardtail). I completed most of the ride with a huge grin on my face! What a great feeling
    I've been kicking around the idea of building a carbon frame at the end of the year, when the frame I want is available again. Can you post some pictures of your bike, I'd love to see it.
    2014 Giant Anthem 27.5
    2013 DeVinci Leo SL
    2009 SE Racing SoCal Flyer
    2008 SE Racing lil Ripper
    2003 TiSport Gman

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Blue Bye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    189
    Quote Originally Posted by Frozenspokes
    Going from a squishy bike to a hardtail?
    More "in addition to" rather than "instead of"

    Leopold - I like your idea a lot!

    mopartodd - I'd love to share pics, I'll get some up this afternoon when I get home
    Life is like riding a bicycle - in order to keep your balance, you must keep moving. ~Albert Einstein

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    7,877
    Quote Originally Posted by Frozenspokes
    Going from a squishy bike to a hardtail?
    This is a bigger determinant than the 8lbs me thinks.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Blue Bye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    189
    Here she is - generic carbon fiber frame, beefy manitou front fork (but also light), mavic crossmax wheels, c/f seatpost, c/f bars, xtr rear, xt front, light weight tires, titanium pedals
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Wow, lightness counts!-lightweight-carbon.jpg  

    Last edited by Blue Bye; 05-06-2011 at 08:19 AM.
    Life is like riding a bicycle - in order to keep your balance, you must keep moving. ~Albert Einstein

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: modifier's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,811
    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker
    Lightweight bikes are great. I generally try to save them for personal record uphill time trials and race days, and instead use my 47 pound 32x20 fully rigid beast for my training rides. My average training ride sees 5,000 feet of vertical ascent on a mix of singletrack and fireroads. The wheels weigh about 6 pounds each (Surly Large Marge 65mm wide double-wall rims, shod with 3" wide DH tires), so the rotating mass becomes a weight training tool of sorts. Try to use your heavier bike as much as possible on your regular solo rides, and then when you go on group rides, take your lightweight bike and smoke the crap out of your riding buddies.
    I don't know if this is a joke or not?? But if it's not I would like to see how you got up to 47lbs with a rigid single speed. Post some pics. What tires are those? Old Savages? Sounds like a torturous beast.
    No it never stops hurting, but if you keep at it you can go faster.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: turnerth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    161
    the vertical bar ends are a nice touch.

  12. #12
    NONDURO
    Reputation: Leopold Porkstacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    6,622
    Quote Originally Posted by modifier
    I don't know if this is a joke or not?? But if it's not I would like to see how you got up to 47lbs with a rigid single speed. Post some pics. What tires are those? Old Savages? Sounds like a torturous beast.
    Here we go, Strava GPS proof as well as photographs—we’ll use March 2011 as the example for the Strava GPS logs, as it was all about riding every day:

    http://www.strava.com/komchallenge/l.../results/march

    And the few photos I have of the bike:






    Wheels:
    front: 26"x65mm Surly Large Marge rim in front, shod with a 26"x3" Nokian Gazzaloddi and a 26"x2.75" innertube
    rear: 24"x65mm Surly Large Marge rim in back, shod with a 24"x3" Arrow Racing Wide Bite DH tire and a 24"x 3.45" Surly-branded (Innova, I think) innertube. The riding weight involves not just heavy rotating mass, but also a few pounds of Li-Ion battery packs for lighting (the lighting setups use aluminum housings, so some more weight there), and then there’s the 12V Bosch car horn under the stem, as well as tools (need singlespeed cone wrenches and stuff onboard as well as tire levers and a spoke wrench) and a spare 24"x3.45" innertube (I am pretty sure these tubes cost around 800 grams a piece). This bike has been a valuable tool for race training.
    QUOTE from MTBR.COM: You have given out too much Reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Blue Bye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    189
    Quote Originally Posted by turnerth
    the vertical bar ends are a nice touch.
    Thanks! Form follows function. I like to be able to sit up more, it helps my back. They come off for races though!
    Life is like riding a bicycle - in order to keep your balance, you must keep moving. ~Albert Einstein

  14. #14
    "2 Wycked"
    Reputation: crazy03's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,076
    Im sure im wrong, but am I the only one that thinks fork is on backwards??
    Ahhhh...Ahhhh....it's the hammy, it's the hammy!!

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    785
    Quote Originally Posted by crazy03
    Im sure im wrong, but am I the only one that thinks fork is on backwards??
    You're wrong...

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by crazy03
    Im sure im wrong, but am I the only one that thinks fork is on backwards??

    It's on correctly. See where the wheel is mounted?

  17. #17
    It's all about the FSR!
    Reputation: Heavy Fluid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    446
    I just learned this myself today. I guess some, if not all, Manitou forks are like that. Looks off at first, but it is on correctly.

  18. #18
    "2 Wycked"
    Reputation: crazy03's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,076
    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Bye
    Here she is - generic carbon fiber frame, beefy manitou front fork (but also light), mavic crossmax wheels, c/f seatpost, c/f bars, xtr front, xt rear, light weight tires, titanium pedals

    ok ok....ive never seen a fork that looks like this, it looked backwards to me.
    Ahhhh...Ahhhh....it's the hammy, it's the hammy!!

  19. #19
    g3h6o3
    Reputation: PissedOffCil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3,708
    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Bye
    Thanks! Form follows function. I like to be able to sit up more, it helps my back. They come off for races though!
    Why did you cut your steerer so short then?
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Blue Bye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    189
    I bought the bike used and that's how it was. I had the bar ends on another bike so I went with what I had for now
    Life is like riding a bicycle - in order to keep your balance, you must keep moving. ~Albert Einstein

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Hand/of/Midas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    2,681
    Quote Originally Posted by crazy03
    Im sure im wrong, but am I the only one that thinks fork is on backwards??
    What is your opinion on THIS fork?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Wow, lightness counts!-magura_fork_full_view_600.jpg  


  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Bobby12many's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    823
    If you think a lighter bike feels great underneath you, try riding a hardtail that actually fits you properly (!)

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Blue Bye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    189
    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby12many
    If you think a lighter bike feels great underneath you, try riding a hardtail that actually fits you properly (!)
    Wow, everyone's a critic huh? I think the bike fits fine, I just prefer sitting a little more upright
    Life is like riding a bicycle - in order to keep your balance, you must keep moving. ~Albert Einstein

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    693
    Quote Originally Posted by Hand/of/Midas
    What is your opinion on THIS fork?

    Magura makes some very nice forks. I never noticed the double arch before...hmmmm.
    Get me the knuckles of Frisco..

  25. #25
    Digital Toast
    Reputation: Zeroack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    449
    I have a buddy who's running a Magura on one of his many rides. He likes it a lot.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •