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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Smile Tips on preventing numb nutz

    Anyone have tips on preventing numb nutz?
    I started taking up riding again. I do some 3-4 hr rides at times.
    A hard seat turns out better. Any other tips out there?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    FUBAR
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    Try changing your seat angle
    The older I get the faster I was!

  3. #3
    ^ That's what I do
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    Try different seats.
    Make sure your bike is fitted to you correctly.
    Wear padded pants.
    '08 Specialized Rockhopper 29er (modified)

  4. #4
    Rolling
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    Ride 11 hours on it.

    Then the 3-4 hour rides will seems great.

  5. #5
    govt kontrakt projkt mgr
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    i only experience tht on road rides or on the trainer. methinks the terrain causes skilled mountain bikers to stand enough that this shouldn't really be much of an occurrence.

  6. #6
    a.k.a. MTBMaven
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    Get a saddle that spreads the weight over a larger surface. Like a Brooks or Selle An-Atomica. Cured my problems. 13.5 hours in the saddle and 200 miles (on the road) with no numbness with the Selle An-Atomica. It's expensive ($140ish) but well worth it.
    I thought of that while riding my bicycle. ~ Albert Einstein on the theory of relativity

  7. #7
    That's ok I'll walk it...
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    I have a box full of saddles trying to find a solution for the numb issue. Until a buddy recommended Koobi saddles, 8hr+ trail rides and no longer numb, like it so well put one on the road bike too.

  8. #8
    ballbuster
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    Swap meets

    Quote Originally Posted by veritechy
    Anyone have tips on preventing numb nutz?
    I started taking up riding again. I do some 3-4 hr rides at times.
    A hard seat turns out better. Any other tips out there?

    Thanks
    Hit some swap meets and stock up on a few different styles and brands of saddles. You can often find $100 saddles for $20.

    I found WTB saddles work well under my tucas, but also found Specialized saddles work as well. My favorite swap meet find was a WTB Laser DH saddle with Ti rails I got for $10. Best saddle evar.

    Try tipping the nose of the saddle down... maybe even slightly more than you think. I also switch between standing and sitting on long gentile climbs just to let some blood flow to the wedding tackle.

  9. #9
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    squishy gel saddles and pads for long rides. The squishier the better in my opinion.
    roccowt.
    rocnbikemeld

  10. #10
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    I also switch between standing and sitting on long gentile climbs just to let some blood flow to the wedding tackle.
    You misspelled "genital".

    -- Evil Patrick

    Some of my Music

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    The trail...shall set you free.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
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    Really great tips!

    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    Hit some swap meets and stock up on a few different styles and brands of saddles. You can often find $100 saddles for $20.

    I found WTB saddles work well under my tucas, but also found Specialized saddles work as well. My favorite swap meet find was a WTB Laser DH saddle with Ti rails I got for $10. Best saddle evar.

    Try tipping the nose of the saddle down... maybe even slightly more than you think. I also switch between standing and sitting on long gentile climbs just to let some blood flow to the wedding tackle.
    Thanks a lot for all the tips! I'll try some of the suggestions for sure. I like biking , but numb nutz are not worth it

  12. #12
    Map Maker
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    Brooks saddles are the answer!

    Quote Originally Posted by mtnfiend
    Get a saddle that spreads the weight over a larger surface. Like a Brooks or Selle An-Atomica. Cured my problems. 13.5 hours in the saddle and 200 miles (on the road) with no numbness with the Selle An-Atomica. It's expensive ($140ish) but well worth it.
    +1 on the brooks saddles
    and +2 on the Selle An-Atomica.

    both saddles are worth their weight in gold when it comes to comfort on long rides.
    Richmond, VA
    Ra-MORE mtb club

  13. #13
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    Lose weight, not only to reduce the load, but reducing fat from the meaty parts down there will also promote less bunching, squishing, and compression of flesh, fabric, etc.

  14. #14
    meh... whatever
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    I also switch between standing and sitting on long gentile climbs just to let some blood flow to the wedding tackle.
    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Patrick
    You misspelled "genital".

    looks like he meant the "non-jewish" climbs...
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  15. #15
    since 4/10/2009
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    It usually takes trying a bunch of saddles to find one that works right for you. The only way to find out what saddle shape fits your bum right is to try them out.

    Right now, I'm having very positive opinions about the specialized rival saddle. It's a bit cushier than I'm used to, but it's not overkill. The big thing is that there are no pressure points for me. The saddle on my commuter HT is an uncomfortable brick (cheap selle italia, I think) and is on the chopping block soon.

  16. #16
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    I've found that the Specialized BG saddles are the best for me. They come in three different widths for most styles too so you can find the one that fits your sit bones the best. Right now really digging the Phenom. As soon as I sat on it I new it was the most comfortable saddle that had ever graced my bottom.
    "Being smart and fit is expensive, but not as expensive as being fat and dumb" - 9.8m/s/s

  17. #17
    Don't Stop Spinnin'!
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    dont sit so long.
    ~every end is a new beginning...

  18. #18
    gnuH
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    Empty them before you ride.

  19. #19
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    Very passionate about your numb nuts.

  20. #20
    Rolling
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwirider
    Empty them before you ride.

  21. #21
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    How soft the seat is or the amount of padding in your shorts is irrelevant. You need to make sure that your weight is being supported by your pelvis, not your soft tissues. This might mean a seat that's wider and flatter at the back (not softer).

    The back edges of many stock saddles curve downwards, increasing pressure on your fruits and veggies. The WTB Laser V saddle has a flat back section and has always worked well for me, but seats are a very subjective thing.

    Also, take note of your seat-height-to-bar-height ratio. If your bar is way lower than your seat then your pelvis has to rotate forward to allow you to reach the bar. Switching a riser bar (or a taller one), a slightly bigger front tire, taller/shorter stem or frame with a taller head tube might be enough to rock you back a bit. A longer travel fork or a 29" front wheel would also achieve this end.

  22. #22
    I Crash Often
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    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    I change poisitons often. Stand, sit, left right, etc.

  23. #23
    Rolling
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    Quote Originally Posted by keylay


    I change poisitons often. Stand, sit, left right, etc.
    What are you looking at as you do this?

    Oh yes,....pine trees and meadows...of course.

  24. #24
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    It's not numb nuts you should worry about. There's a point in which you start getting "shocks" down there, if you don't correct your saddle angle.

  25. #25
    i also unicycle
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    many shops (and plenty of brands) have a saddle demo program, i know wtb is big on this. at many shops(where i work included) are serious about fit and comfort and will let you try out saddles at least around the parking lot or for a ride or two at home. if nothing else a decent LBS can help adjust things and make sure your saddle is in the right place, ie, not tipped too much.
    mtbr says you should know: i work in a bike shop.
    bikes & beers (on my blog) http://idontrideenough.blogspot.com/

  26. #26
    mtbr member
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    Great tips.

    Quote Originally Posted by asin
    How soft the seat is or the amount of padding in your shorts is irrelevant. You need to make sure that your weight is being supported by your pelvis, not your soft tissues. This might mean a seat that's wider and flatter at the back (not softer).

    The back edges of many stock saddles curve downwards, increasing pressure on your fruits and veggies. The WTB Laser V saddle has a flat back section and has always worked well for me, but seats are a very subjective thing.

    Also, take note of your seat-height-to-bar-height ratio. If your bar is way lower than your seat then your pelvis has to rotate forward to allow you to reach the bar. Switching a riser bar (or a taller one), a slightly bigger front tire, taller/shorter stem or frame with a taller head tube might be enough to rock you back a bit. A longer travel fork or a 29" front wheel would also achieve this end.

    Great tips from all of you! I really appreciate the inputs!

  27. #27
    Unpredictable
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    veritechy, you should be concerned about numbnutz because it is the first symptoms of peroneal nerve palsy. Advanced cases can leave permanent sensory loss and loss of erections. The sit on your pelvic bones advice is correct. Find a saddle that feels right - it may not be wider or dofter. In fact for me wider and softer, plus larger pads in the duds are a bigger problem.

  28. #28
    locked - time out
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    Quote Originally Posted by zarr
    squishy gel saddles and pads for long rides. The squishier the better in my opinion.
    So instead of supporting his weight, he sinks down further, placing even more pressure on his sensitive areas.

    Yeah, this is great advice.


  29. #29
    Feet back and spread 'em!
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    i like the WTB saddles for the money, but the best for my fat butt is the Selle SMP...get the model that is wide enough for your sit bones...big dollah, but the absolute best, imho.
    the time is right for violent revolution

  30. #30
    Praise Bob
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    Just to reinforce what the other more reasonable people are saying:

    1 - Wear shorts with padded chamois liners. This will make a world of difference and keep things "in place".

    2 - Generally speaking going with a softer gel type saddle is the wrong move. Opinions on saddle hardness will differ but a super soft gel saddle will cause you to stink down into the saddle and then that puts pressure in the wrong areas. Most good saddles are somewhat firm.

    3 - You sit on your "sit bones". The distance between those pelvic protrusions determines the proper width of your saddle. This varies from person to person. It may take you a while to find a saddle that fits you. Most LBS can give advice on this.

    4 - Train. Saddle soreness will go away to some extent with training. You will rely on your thighs to keep your weight from being fully seated. You will get used to shifting your body position to relieve pressure. It becomes second nature.

    5 - Cockpit setup (no pun intended). You might need to adjust your seating position. Too low of handle bars or a saddle that is not tilted correctly may cause your weight to be biased to far on the nose of the saddle. You should feel like you are slightly pushed back on the saddle, you shouldnt be sliding forward.

    hope that helps!

  31. #31
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    Get a fully rigid single speed. You'll hardly even sit.

    Definitely make sure your bike fits properly and your saddle is in the right position. You really just have to try saddles until you find one that fits you right. I use WTB on mtn and Brooks on road, but I'll probably switch to Brooks on the mountain too, because they just fit me well. Good luck.

  32. #32
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    If I may be so bold; if you would accept my humble authority? Do NOT play with your seat angle. A saddle should always be flat and if that is utterly uncomfortable to you then time to change saddles. What you might look at beyond that is; too much pressure on the nerves that lead to that area can be caused by some odd circumstances.

    ONe - raising your bar height (in relation to the seat height) may rock your hips back and thus relieve pressure on those nerves.

    Two - YOur saddle shuod be set fore and aft based on you knee plumb lined over your pedala axle, Sometimes a wrong realtion there can cause you to rock forward to counter your pedal force. Check this or go have yourself fitted.

    There are many things that can come in to play here and I DO NOT want to come across as "diagnosing" your situation. I do think that you can address this with a good fit and saddle relationship. What I most strongly suggest as a fit expert is that you have yourself custom fitted by someone who is actually trained and knowledgable and ascribes to Andy Pruitts medical bike fit theory (if they say "Andy who?" find another fit person or call Andy at Boulder Center for sports medicine)

    Good Luck and if I can help email me, troy@otesports.com

    Cheers
    Troy

    [I]Over the Edge Sports - Fruita - Sedona - Hurricane - Melrose
    www.otesports.com

  33. #33
    Retro Grouch
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    I've tried about 6 different Specialized "Winkow Wedge" saddles, and EVERY RIDE I've experienced numbness. HOWEVER, I now use a WTB leather saddle (will have to find the model name for you later -- I'm at work right now) that produces VERY LITTLE NUMBNESS if at all!!! It also has Kevlar sides, which is nice in protecting the leather from damage on falls.

    It has some great angles for climbing, and for sitting back on the saddle. What a RELIEF.
    Carpe diem while you can ...

  34. #34
    wanna dance?
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    KOPS was a myth, disproven long ago.

    Try different saddles & moving them around, raising bars, shorter stems, etc... something will start to feel right. Remember you're on an MTB & not a road bike, & depending on your travel, trail type, and any number of variables, you may not wind up with what looks or feels "normal". Trial and error, x100.

    Keep twiddling the knobs, you'll come up with something good.

  35. #35
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    You might wanna check out the competitive cyclist saddle demo program. For a small fee they will send you their top sellers to try for a week. I believe if you purchase a saddle from them part of that fee is then invcluded in the price. Very cool program.

    http://www.competitivecyclist.com/mo...es/demo-saddle

  36. #36
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    I've tried some of the suggestions from everyone. I got a WTB rocket v pro. The seat is firm and feels a lot better than the soft seats (thanks Spartacus). It properly supports the sitbones and doesn't let you sink your precious parts into it. Leveling out the seat also helped a lot. I also try to stand more. Great suggestions from everyone. Really appreciated.

  37. #37
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    Glad you're figuring it out.

  38. #38
    Log off and go ride!
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    In addition, a wife or girlfriend (or both, if available) can provide additional stimulation in that area immediately post-ride.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by dave54
    In addition, a wife or girlfriend (or both, if available) can provide additional stimulation in that area immediately post-ride.
    I don't know about the immediately part...a shower might be nice.

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