Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 39
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: veritechy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    602

    Smile Tips on preventing numb nutz

    Anyone have tips on preventing numb nutz?
    I started taking up riding again. I do some 3-4 hr rides at times.
    A hard seat turns out better. Any other tips out there?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    FUBAR
    Reputation: Gumshoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    30
    Try changing your seat angle
    The older I get the faster I was!

  3. #3
    ^ That's what I do
    Reputation: Hopping_Rocks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    746
    Try different seats.
    Make sure your bike is fitted to you correctly.
    Wear padded pants.
    '08 Specialized Rockhopper 29er (modified)

  4. #4
    Rolling
    Reputation: lidarman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,119
    Ride 11 hours on it.

    Then the 3-4 hour rides will seems great.

  5. #5
    govt kontrakt projkt mgr
    Reputation: ArmySlowRdr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    6,176
    i only experience tht on road rides or on the trainer. methinks the terrain causes skilled mountain bikers to stand enough that this shouldn't really be much of an occurrence.

  6. #6
    a.k.a. MTBMaven
    Reputation: mtnfiend's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,703
    Get a saddle that spreads the weight over a larger surface. Like a Brooks or Selle An-Atomica. Cured my problems. 13.5 hours in the saddle and 200 miles (on the road) with no numbness with the Selle An-Atomica. It's expensive ($140ish) but well worth it.
    I thought of that while riding my bicycle. ~ Albert Einstein on the theory of relativity

  7. #7
    That's ok I'll walk it...
    Reputation: Hawkens's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    227
    I have a box full of saddles trying to find a solution for the numb issue. Until a buddy recommended Koobi saddles, 8hr+ trail rides and no longer numb, like it so well put one on the road bike too.

  8. #8
    ballbuster
    Reputation: pimpbot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    12,627

    Swap meets

    Quote Originally Posted by veritechy
    Anyone have tips on preventing numb nutz?
    I started taking up riding again. I do some 3-4 hr rides at times.
    A hard seat turns out better. Any other tips out there?

    Thanks
    Hit some swap meets and stock up on a few different styles and brands of saddles. You can often find $100 saddles for $20.

    I found WTB saddles work well under my tucas, but also found Specialized saddles work as well. My favorite swap meet find was a WTB Laser DH saddle with Ti rails I got for $10. Best saddle evar.

    Try tipping the nose of the saddle down... maybe even slightly more than you think. I also switch between standing and sitting on long gentile climbs just to let some blood flow to the wedding tackle.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    3,958
    squishy gel saddles and pads for long rides. The squishier the better in my opinion.
    roccowt.
    rocnbikemeld

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Evil Patrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    2,608
    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    I also switch between standing and sitting on long gentile climbs just to let some blood flow to the wedding tackle.
    You misspelled "genital".

    -- Evil Patrick

    My Music

    My Videos

    Ride everything! Remember, Elvis died pushing.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: veritechy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    602

    Really great tips!

    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    Hit some swap meets and stock up on a few different styles and brands of saddles. You can often find $100 saddles for $20.

    I found WTB saddles work well under my tucas, but also found Specialized saddles work as well. My favorite swap meet find was a WTB Laser DH saddle with Ti rails I got for $10. Best saddle evar.

    Try tipping the nose of the saddle down... maybe even slightly more than you think. I also switch between standing and sitting on long gentile climbs just to let some blood flow to the wedding tackle.
    Thanks a lot for all the tips! I'll try some of the suggestions for sure. I like biking , but numb nutz are not worth it

  12. #12
    Map Maker
    Reputation: cbchess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,255

    Brooks saddles are the answer!

    Quote Originally Posted by mtnfiend
    Get a saddle that spreads the weight over a larger surface. Like a Brooks or Selle An-Atomica. Cured my problems. 13.5 hours in the saddle and 200 miles (on the road) with no numbness with the Selle An-Atomica. It's expensive ($140ish) but well worth it.
    +1 on the brooks saddles
    and +2 on the Selle An-Atomica.

    both saddles are worth their weight in gold when it comes to comfort on long rides.
    Richmond, VA
    Ra-MORE mtb club

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    284
    Lose weight, not only to reduce the load, but reducing fat from the meaty parts down there will also promote less bunching, squishing, and compression of flesh, fabric, etc.

  14. #14
    meh... whatever
    Reputation: monogod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    5,314
    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    I also switch between standing and sitting on long gentile climbs just to let some blood flow to the wedding tackle.
    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Patrick
    You misspelled "genital".

    looks like he meant the "non-jewish" climbs...
    "The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away."

  15. #15
    Rep Power: Infinity
    Reputation: NateHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    11,548
    It usually takes trying a bunch of saddles to find one that works right for you. The only way to find out what saddle shape fits your bum right is to try them out.

    Right now, I'm having very positive opinions about the specialized rival saddle. It's a bit cushier than I'm used to, but it's not overkill. The big thing is that there are no pressure points for me. The saddle on my commuter HT is an uncomfortable brick (cheap selle italia, I think) and is on the chopping block soon.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    459
    I've found that the Specialized BG saddles are the best for me. They come in three different widths for most styles too so you can find the one that fits your sit bones the best. Right now really digging the Phenom. As soon as I sat on it I new it was the most comfortable saddle that had ever graced my bottom.
    "Being smart and fit is expensive, but not as expensive as being fat and dumb" - 9.8m/s/s

  17. #17
    Don't Stop Spinnin'!
    Reputation: ReD_tomato's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    664
    dont sit so long.
    ~every end is a new beginning...

  18. #18
    gnuH
    Reputation: kiwirider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,163
    Empty them before you ride.

  19. #19
    MTBR Member
    Reputation: ncfisherman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,712
    Very passionate about your numb nuts.

  20. #20
    Rolling
    Reputation: lidarman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,119
    Quote Originally Posted by kiwirider
    Empty them before you ride.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    334
    How soft the seat is or the amount of padding in your shorts is irrelevant. You need to make sure that your weight is being supported by your pelvis, not your soft tissues. This might mean a seat that's wider and flatter at the back (not softer).

    The back edges of many stock saddles curve downwards, increasing pressure on your fruits and veggies. The WTB Laser V saddle has a flat back section and has always worked well for me, but seats are a very subjective thing.

    Also, take note of your seat-height-to-bar-height ratio. If your bar is way lower than your seat then your pelvis has to rotate forward to allow you to reach the bar. Switching a riser bar (or a taller one), a slightly bigger front tire, taller/shorter stem or frame with a taller head tube might be enough to rock you back a bit. A longer travel fork or a 29" front wheel would also achieve this end.

  22. #22
    I Crash Often
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    442
    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    I change poisitons often. Stand, sit, left right, etc.

  23. #23
    Rolling
    Reputation: lidarman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,119
    Quote Originally Posted by keylay


    I change poisitons often. Stand, sit, left right, etc.
    What are you looking at as you do this?

    Oh yes,....pine trees and meadows...of course.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,297
    It's not numb nuts you should worry about. There's a point in which you start getting "shocks" down there, if you don't correct your saddle angle.

  25. #25
    i also unicycle
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,044
    many shops (and plenty of brands) have a saddle demo program, i know wtb is big on this. at many shops(where i work included) are serious about fit and comfort and will let you try out saddles at least around the parking lot or for a ride or two at home. if nothing else a decent LBS can help adjust things and make sure your saddle is in the right place, ie, not tipped too much.
    mtbr says you should know: i work in a bike shop.
    bikes & beers (on my blog) http://idontrideenough.blogspot.com/

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •