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  1. #1
    nocturnal oblivion
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    Tick season! Any suggestions for riding companion?

    My pooch has been averaging 2 ticks a day, my girlfriend just today had 2 as well (she's blaming the dog , I've had zero). As much as I'd like to I can't put a collar on my girlfriend. Any non-toxic repellents that you've found to work? I've been reading about 'essential oils' and others but that's all from the unreliable section of the internet.
    "...like sex with the trail." - Boe

  2. #2
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    Well... I mean, you could always stop riding.... No more ticks, at least!
    Sometimes, I question the value of my content.

  3. #3
    meow meow
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    for your girlfriend or your dog?

  4. #4
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    You can’t stop ticks, unless you avoid the outdoors as Erik1245 suggests, not practical. For your girlfriend, you should arrange a full body inspection after every ride (ya, I know, you’ll start riding with her five times a day). The object is to remove all wandering ticks before they bite and stay. Tick diseases are nasty and can keep you from riding for days if you get sick. For the pup, I use Frontline Flea and Tick every month. You should keep an eye on the dog’s coat and remove any wandering and biting ticks as well. Remember to try not to squeeze them when removing, a pair of tweezers at the front of the tick vice the squeezing the body will remove better. Don’t try to burn them off or you will have other problems.
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  5. #5
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    It will only partially protect but if you are in a really bad area you could use permathrin, (or whatever it's called). It works great, just never spray directly on your skin and let it dry on your gear/clothes before using them. Don't stand down wind when spraying.

  6. #6
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    I contracted Lyme disease about 8 years ago. Not fun. Doing fine now, but I wouldn't suggest it. I found one on me the other day after a gravel road ride. Go figure.

  7. #7
    nocturnal oblivion
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lenny7
    I contracted Lyme disease about 8 years ago. Not fun. Doing fine now, but I wouldn't suggest it. I found one on me the other day after a gravel road ride. Go figure.
    That does suck. Buddy of mine had it, no bueno. Anyone ever try garlic? Apparently people feed the garlic capsules to their pets, might also work for mosquitos they say.
    "...like sex with the trail." - Boe

  8. #8
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    ppppppppppppppppp
    Last edited by tjchad; 03-25-2015 at 04:25 PM.

  9. #9
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    The CDC has an alarming list of tickborne diseases here

    I've known two people who became ill from tick bites. Once contracted bubonic plague, likely from hiking near a prairie dog colony (New Mexico: land of the flea, home of the plague) and another who got Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (yeah, the tick has the spots, not the person). We thought this came from hanging out for lunch near where mountain goats had bedded down deep in the Bob Marshall wilderness of Montana.

    Fortunately, neither illness is viral and so both were cured by a course of antibiotics, but both people were seriously ill.

    CDC does recommend using DEET or Permethrin to repel ticks.

    # Products containing permethrin can be used to treat clothing and gear, such as boots, pants, socks and tents. It remains protective through several washings.
    # Repellents containing 20% or more DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide) can be applied to the skin, and they can protect up to several hours. Always follow product instructions! Parents should apply this product to their children, avoiding hands, eyes, and mouth.
    # Other repellents registered by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) may be found at http://cfpub.epa.gov/oppref/insect/

    # Tumbling clothes in a dryer on the highest heat for at least one hour may help kill remaining ticks.
    # Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming indoors has been shown to reduce your risk of being bitten by a tick.

  10. #10
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    ppppppppppppppppp
    Last edited by tjchad; 03-25-2015 at 04:22 PM.

  11. #11
    nocturnal oblivion
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    Quote Originally Posted by tjchad
    Chiggers suck too. Went hunting as a kid and my friend got a chigger on the end of his... flugelhorn and put some "Chigger Rid" on it. Apparently it burns if it gets in the end of your flugelhorn...
    My dog had a tick on her...uh...flugelnub? It was well burrowed by the time I found it. We've been closer ever since.
    I'm going to try a DIY garlic spray on the dog, seeing as ingestion may be bad for them. I found a recipe online using minced garlic, mineral oil, soap and water. Filled a spray bottle with it this morning and it is very potent. My dog will obviously stink of garlic.
    "...like sex with the trail." - Boe

  12. #12
    ILIKEBIKES
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    ppppppppppppppppp
    Last edited by tjchad; 03-25-2015 at 04:20 PM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by tjchad
    We used to do the garlic powder thing for our cats to prevent fleas. I just read recently though that garlic has been added to lists of what's considered toxic for dogs and cats...? Anybody else?

    "Onions and garlic contain the toxic ingredient thiosulphate. Onions are more of a danger."

    http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=1&aid=2414
    This is not recently considered toxic to dogs and cats. It's long been recognized to be toxic to dogs and cats, and cats, ESPECIALLY, are sensitive. And the dried, powdered garlic is ESPECIALLY bad. Get the garlic away from your cat NOW.

    Why has nobody recommended topicals like Frontline Plus or Advantix for the dog? You can get it at practically any pet store now.

    Be careful what you give to cats or dogs who live in households with cats. Some of the topical flea/tick medications are VERY toxic to cats. Asking a veterinarian should help you figure out which product works best in your area and in your specific situation. It's something of a shame that the stuff is available everywhere now, because you lose the valuable advice of a veterinarian if you skip that part.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by stumblemumble
    My dog had a tick on her...uh...flugelnub? It was well burrowed by the time I found it. We've been closer ever since.
    I'm going to try a DIY garlic spray on the dog, seeing as ingestion may be bad for them. I found a recipe online using minced garlic, mineral oil, soap and water. Filled a spray bottle with it this morning and it is very potent. My dog will obviously stink of garlic.
    Don't do it. Anything you put on your dog's body is likely to get ingested. Dogs lick themselves.

  15. #15
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    Frontline is what we use up here in New England. Once a month application, seems to work well and our dog is fine.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by thefriar
    Frontline is what we use up here in New England. Once a month application, seems to work well and our dog is fine.
    This^
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  17. #17
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    ppppppppppppppppp
    Last edited by tjchad; 03-25-2015 at 04:20 PM.

  18. #18
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    I’m no expert on this, but I do spend a lot of time in the woods with my K9. Seems what folks here want is a repellent. For K9, Frontline is a bite-and-die for the ticks. The chemical is in the dog’s blood stream. Advantage boasts that they are also a repellent which is why it may be too strong and make some dogs sick. A good flea/tick collar if worn all season will repel ticks on K9. For us humans, short of permethrin, an insecticide not to be applied direct to skin, there really is no repellent. I stand by the find ‘em and pull off before they bite. Unlike mosquitoes which are attracted to carbon dioxide from your breath, ticks are just parasites which drop on you when you rub into trees, grass, and plants on the trail.
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  19. #19
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    Shaving legs?

    Change in the parking lot, check yourself there, bag the clothes and wash. A good pair of pliers and a magnifying glass.

    DEET seems to work, depending on how desperate they are.

    Damn parasites.

  20. #20
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    When I lived in Maine, my dog would get 25-50 dog ticks on a ride. I just went over him afterward (you can feel them better than you can see them), and kept a gross tick-filled bottle of alcohol handy to dump them into as I picked them off. - easier than flushing each one. These were not lyme-disease carrying deer ticks, so they were more gross than dangerous...but they are a lot less gross if you find them before they are engorged with blood. I didn't get as many on the bike, but a few. In the field for work we'd get plenty, we would scan our outer clothes for them when we were done, and then if we felt any crawling in the truck,we just threw them out the window.

  21. #21
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    the only thing i got out of reading this thread is that
    1) dogs and cats may be related to vampires, and
    2) some dude fondled his dog's flugelnub

  22. #22
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    The good news is that most diseases need the tick to be 'attached' for 24+ hours for the disease to transfer. Some of the minor ones are 6-8 hours, but none of them are 'instant'.

    As long as you do a thorough tick check after each ride (yay, naked time with the SO), you should be fine.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrekFan
    the only thing i got out of reading this thread is that
    1) dogs and cats may be related to vampires, and
    2) some dude fondled his dog's flugelnub
    lmao

    I opened this thread hoping to get some good advice too.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Nasium
    lmao

    I opened this thread hoping to get some good advice too.
    Since when has any thread on here not contained a significant amount of bullshitting?
    Sometimes, I question the value of my content.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lenny7
    I contracted Lyme disease about 8 years ago. Not fun. Doing fine now, but I wouldn't suggest it. I found one on me the other day after a gravel road ride. Go figure.
    my cousin has it. his knees swell up so bad he can barely walk. hes on a drug regimin that costs 13k a year. so yeah, ticks are bad news. i use frontline on my cat, sometimes ticks get on him but never bite. for me i wear crew socks and off and then check myself out in the shower.

  26. #26
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    DEET on your skin, permethrin on your clothes. The DEET repels them, the Permethrin kills them.

    Sawyers sells a spray on permethrin treatment for your clothes - follow directions closely. I put it on my socks, shorts and jersey, and ticks no longer make it to any sensitive areas. DEET on the legs inhibits them from climbing higher.

    Lymes and other tick borne diseases are no joke; don't mess around with garlic, etc. Get what really works: permethrin on clothes and DEET on exposed skin.

  27. #27
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    Frontline and Advantix work well for most dogs. But do some research about reactions and you'll see there are plenty of horror stories. We applied Advantix to my dog on Tuesday night and she was feaking out so badly that we would up bathing it off of her within an hour. Some dogs find it uncomfortable, while others have allergic reactions or skin burns caused by it. Make sure it's the correct dosage for your dog's weight, but even then it can still cause problems.

    As for an alternative, my wife e-discovered something called "neem" but we've yet to try it first hand, so I can't speak to it's effectiveness. Neem is a flea repellent only, doesn't seem to work on ticks so you'll still need to find something there. I'm more worried about fleas for the short term, since my dog isn't behaviorally ready for the woods yet.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by MightyDingus
    The good news is that most diseases need the tick to be 'attached' for 24+ hours for the disease to transfer. Some of the minor ones are 6-8 hours, but none of them are 'instant'.

    As long as you do a thorough tick check after each ride (yay, naked time with the SO), you should be fine.
    This is correct.
    we live near garrapada canyon.didnt know that meant tick in spanish when we moved there.

    we once had a golden that got 300 ticks on a walk.yes,we counted them. none were imbedded.i can feel a tick on my setter immediately.

    the best removal tool looks like a piece of aluminum with a slit.$3 at REI.always gets the head.

    all the repellents for dogs are toxic.i do occasionally use them at peak season in a bad year,but not routinely.

    only the very small ticks carry lyme.

    if one does get imbedded , 2 doxycycline caps right away are as good as the full treatment course later for prevention

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by MightyDingus
    The good news is that most diseases need the tick to be 'attached' for 24+ hours for the disease to transfer. Some of the minor ones are 6-8 hours, but none of them are 'instant'.

    As long as you do a thorough tick check after each ride (yay, naked time with the SO), you should be fine.
    I can't stress enough how WRONG this information is. Mine was attached to me no more than 8 hours and I contracted full blown Lyme. While I was sick I was intouch with numerous people who have the same story. You hear the 24 hour thing from "experts" and "doctors" but it's not good information. My "Doctor" told me, "we don't have Lyme in Texas." I wish he would have told that to the tick.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrekFan
    the only thing i got out of reading this thread is that
    1) dogs and cats may be related to vampires, and
    2) some dude fondled his dog's flugelnub

    I laughed so hard it hurts

  31. #31
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    Theres an article on this in this months dirtrag. Check it out

  32. #32
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    I use frontline on my dog every month.. it works.. for the wife/Girl Friend... a full body check after each ride it a must .. use a nice massage oil on her ;-p

    on a serious note.. Rosemary oil either spray form or oil form works well rubbed on your skin before a ride..
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by JEM2
    . for the wife/Girl Friend... a full body check after each ride it a must .. use a nice massage oil on her ;-p

    on a serious note.. Rosemary oil either spray form or oil form works well rubbed on your skin before a ride..
    JEM
    I should do this for both my wife and girlfriend?

    Just kidding. I've heard of rosemary oil, but I would I think it would just make you sweat more and have the buggers stick to you easier as you rip through the brush.
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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarguy
    I should do this for both my wife and girlfriend?

    Just kidding. I've heard of rosemary oil, but I would I think it would just make you sweat more and have the buggers stick to you easier as you rip through the brush.
    at the same time if you can swing it!!
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  35. #35
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    Frontline every 45 days but when it's really heavy I'd spray him down with that natural Cutter insect spray, seemed to help keep them off.
    http://www.amazon.com/Cutter-95917-N.../dp/B004J1IS5U

  36. #36
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    Stumblemumble -

    What kind of dog do you have?

    If you take your dog outside, you should apply Frontline or a similar product. I feel there is too much risk to not apply it to my dog.

    - 2 other steps i have found to be very helpful. - personal observations - these could be bogus

    1) I have a hair dog not a fur dog (medium length hair). When riding and hiking season approaches I shave him down to the short setting on the clippers. This makes it MUCH easier to see ticks when they get on him, but also gives them less to grab onto and seems to reduce the # of ticks post ride

    2) water. My dog loves to swim and it seems to help reduce the ticks on him. When we get droughts or ride where there isn't water he seems to get more ticks on him than when he gets wet. I usually like to make sure he gets to swim several times during a ride and he usually goes in for a dip post ride. again this seems to reduce the number of ticks he gets on him.

    Post ride tick check. It's part of the routine, quick towel off for both of us. And then some brushing.

  37. #37
    nocturnal oblivion
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    She's a jack russel/bull terrier mix. Very easy to find the ticks on her so the post ride check is routine. I'm trying to avoid the Frontline, I did try the DIY garlic oil spray around her neck where she can't lick it. Then she gets a bath when we get home. Doesn't phase her one bit that she reeks of garlic. Day one went well, one tick instead of the usual 4. Further evidence is needed.
    In the meantime I started taking garlic pills myself, see what happens. I hate DEET. It's going to be a big year for mosquitos and ticks.
    "...like sex with the trail." - Boe

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