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  1. #1
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    Road cycling vs MTB

    Which is better for your fitness and why?

    It feels when mountain biking, I am using more of my upper body,
    but I don't know much about road cycling, I am asking because I want to get a road bike, I know it's going to be more mileage than MTB. Each mile on the trail is harder, slower than road.

    But I want to mix things up so I am not doing too much of one thing.

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    In my opinion, road biking is a great way to increase your fitness level. I road bike to get in shape for mountain biking and notice a huge difference. I think training on a road bike will make a person a better mtb rider. I may get some flack for this, however while on a road bike, you are constantly pedaling vs up and downs on a mtb... I live in Utah and we have tons of climbing, however it is still up and down vs. constantly spinning...

  4. #4
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    Fitness can be defined in many ways. Lets compare it this way: Road biking is compared to distance running as MTB is compared to running sprints.

    Both worlds can be very fit. The fitness can be on the same level, but just different types. If you intermingle the two types, you will have the best of both worlds, but will also hurt each of them a bit too. If you start doing distance routines and sprints, then your sprint speed will decrease slightly and you may hurt your distance times as well. It is hard to explain, but in the end both worlds can be very "fit".

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  5. #5
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    Either is better than sitting behind this frickin computer....

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoorCyclist
    Each mile on the trail is harder
    That's not necessarily true.
    "Fact is only what you believe; fact and fiction work as a team." Jack Johnson

  7. #7
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    How much should I spend on a road bike
    My budget is 600-1300 and not sure if I should spend the upper budget

  8. #8
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    I don't have road bike ... but.

    Point 1:
    A road bike needs to fit. Even more so than a MTB.

    I've gathered that parts like Shimano 105 are pretty nice already, or even Sora. No bling but they work.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  9. #9
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    Just like MTB's, the real investment is in the frames. all components can be upgraded. My strategy for buying bikes (and guitars) is get the best you can afford while still leaving a bit of a budget for accessories. If the case of a road bike, you'd want a cyclocomputer probably with cadence. A super light and small wedge pack for flat repair. clipless pedals and probably a new pair of road shoes since you wouldn't want to swap cleats from MTB shoes to road shoes.and then there is road specific clothing if you don't wear tights on the MTB.
    Food for thought anyway.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mopartodd
    Either is better than sitting behind this frickin computer....
    ^^

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoorCyclist
    How much should I spend on a road bike
    My budget is 600-1300 and not sure if I should spend the upper budget
    I started cycling on a road bike before I began mountain biking. I'm still an avid road biker, though I find myself riding mtb much more.

    A maximum budget of $1300 is plenty, in my opinion. If you look at used bikes you'll be able to find a good bike for less than that.

    The biggest thing about buying a road bike is fit. I believe that fit on a road bike is more important than on a mountain bike. Ride a whole bunch of bikes, several sizes, and try to figure out whats best for you.

    As for components, I would recommend 105s or better, though dipping into the low end won't really hurt you. Road bikes are, overall, simpler than mountain bikes and they take much less abuse.

    In regards to the original question, I think that road cycling is better for all around cardiovascular fitness. Its a more sustained effort. When I road cycle my heart rate goes up and stays up. When I mountain bike my heart rate rises and falls and I find that leg strength is more of a factor.

  12. #12
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    I actually disagree with this. If you are really honest about why you are road biking, fitness/enjoyment/racing, then the cheapest bike with dependable parts THAT FITS will do. I can pretty much swear that their there is no real difference in performance between 105 and DuraAce. Likewise between Apex and Red. Do the higher end parts look nicer and weigh less, sure. But all of em work really fn really well.

    As for frames, if you just want to enjoy/workout/race anything light that won't brake in half will do just fine so long as it fits. If you want to race and you really are poor/smart, get something you don't mind crashing (ie. steel or alu.).

    If you think you can buy your way into looking cool/riding well, well that's just silly. Road is the great equalizer. A schmo' on an old Schwinn who rides 5 days a week will still cook a lawyer with a $5000 frame.


    **The only thing I obsess on with road bikes are tires and wheels. Outside of that... I could give a rats ass. A cheapo' aluminum bike feels just like a high zoot carbon bike if you have nice wheels/tires and don't over inflate**
    Last edited by olapiquena; 09-29-2010 at 11:54 AM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by olapiquena
    I actually disagree with this. If you are really honest about why you are road biking, fitness/enjoyment/racing, then the cheapest bike with dependable parts THAT FITS will do. I can pretty much swear that their there is no real difference in performance between 105 and DuraAce.
    Hi, for the hardest work out I could be riding my heavy MTB with knobbies, but I want to ride to do more sight seeing and go further than riding my MTB on the street.
    Will a lighter bike will be more benefiticial when going longer distance?

    BTW, I am on a MTB medium size around 17-18" but on a road bike I clear the standover of a 50cm bike which is like a small frame road bike, but standover clearance should I be looking for?

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    Quote Originally Posted by PoorCyclist
    Hi, for the hardest work out I could be riding my heavy MTB with knobbies, but I want to ride to do more sight seeing and go further than riding my MTB on the street.
    Will a lighter bike will be more benefiticial when going longer distance?

    BTW, I am on a MTB medium size around 17-18" but on a road bike I clear the standover of a 50cm bike which is like a small frame road bike, but standover clearance should I be looking for?


    Top tube length is what is important in fit , visit the LBS to get an idea of what fits the best . FWIW , try to buy Shimano 105 level or better , there is a difference . A lighter bike will also make a difference .

  15. #15
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    [QUOTE=
    Will a lighter bike will be more benefiticial when going longer distance?[/QUOTE]

    Yes, but to what degree? Again, if you are really just looking to get out and ride, or break into racing I don't think it matters. In fact, a little extra weight might get you in better shape! But that's blasphemy. Seriously, get a cheap bike, Ride it. If you end up logging a ton of miles (like over 150 a week) while still riding mountain, after a year save up and buy a wonder bike if that's what you want. Will the wonder bike make you faster? Barely.

    [QUOTE=BTW, I am on a MTB medium size around 17-18" but on a road bike I clear the standover of a 50cm bike which is like a small frame road bike, but standover clearance should I be looking for?[/QUOTE]

    I ride a mtb with a 15" seat tube. What does that mean? Nothing. If you want to ride a well fitting road bike, go into a good shop and ask em' what they think. As for standover, well, have fun with that. If you ride a medium mtn bike I'm imagining that you are between 5'6 and 5'10" which very loosely speaking puts you on a road bike with anywhere from a 52cm to 56cm top-tube. That said, you may ride a 60cm top-tube. Go get on bikes or borrow one from a friend. That said, the Competitive Cyclist website has a 'fit guide'. It's super ballparky, but who knows..

  16. #16
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    roadies like to pretend like low end components will just explode. road cycling is so easy on most gear. theres no jumping, no drops, no (frequent) crashing.. its all good, even sora. i dont like to ride anything less than an XT/x9 rear d on a mtb (slap drives me nuts), but on the road that thing is just along for the ride.. couple that with a small spread cassette and it just doesnt matter. all the front shifters shift poorly, road and mtb.

    my road bike is all 105 10 speed, i got a deal i couldnt pass on it. i went on vacation and rented a low end jamis with 8 speed sora. the sora shifts just as well, the parts are so drastically cheaper and the performance is the same.

    save on components, get nice wheels and tires and a bike that fits like a glove. or if you insist on lastest and greatest, ill sell you my 105 10s drivetrain and cassette with nearly no wear im going back to 8.

    especially at that price point, most shops arent going to properly fit you to a bike. they're going to sell you whats in stock, aggressively. road fits pretty important, unfortunately you'll largely have to rely on yourself to gather the info, or pay for a professional fitting.

  17. #17
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    I will say that I did a lot of road riding a couple of years ago, and when I would go ride my mtb, I would average about 9.5 to 10 mph on the trails. This year, I have put maybe 20 miles on my roadie, and after about a month of riding mtb a couple of times a week, I am averaging about 9.5 to 10mph. That being said, at that time, I had just started riding mtb and my technical sucked, now my technical is MUCH better, but my fitness isn't where it was a couple of years ago.

    I tend to think that if I had upped my road riding a bit this year, I could have had a better overall fitness level, but I wouldn't have had as much fun on a bike.

    Just my observations...
    Trying to win hearts and minds, but willing to stomp them if necessary.

  18. #18
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    Road riding is kinda like this.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  19. #19
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    MTB riding is my main hobby / sport, but I find that I can't recover from my training rides enough to ride the mtb daily. Also, there is a bit of a commute to my local trails. I use the road bike between mtb rides because I can meter out the effort according my recovery level. It also seems to be improving my mtb endurance - as others have mentioned it is more constant pedaling rather the "interval" style of mtb'ing.

    I used to ride my mtb on the road and I couldn't believe how much better the road bike felt.

  20. #20
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    Road riding sucks! There, I said it. Yes, it's better than not riding. But so what. Sure it will help your "fitness" level. But again, so what.

    I am a roadie of 40 years and mtbr of 20+ years. I also happen to live in a mecca of road riding and within spitting distance of mtb's birthplace. I still have a nice road bike with even nicer wheels and tires, but it gathers dust most of the year and only comes out when the trails are too sloppy to ride. That's it.

    I can ride for hours on end on a mtb bike with loads of vertical, technical, and distance. But when I hop on my road bike, it's like some kind of forced workout at the gym. I can still smoke 95% of the roadies around here, but who cares. The exhilaration is just not there... replaced by rude drivers, traffic, and exhaust fumes.

    To the OP - get yourself a road bike to mix it up a little. Just don't spend too much money, as it too will quickly gather dust...

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    I don't know if this sounds crazy or stupid or both but I like to ride my mtb on the road. From where live I can choose routes from 12 to 40 miles that are half paved and half vineyard access roads. The mtb handles both better than a road bike would. Currently I only have a FS 29er. I am thinking of either getting a 29er hard tail and run 1.8-1.95's for combo riding or get a CX bike. I test a rode a Spesh Crux and liked it.

    Anyway I feel I am getting a good workout on the MTB bike over the road. I would say if you are out climbing, you are getting a good workout either way. I conlusion: ride up hills on whatever bike you have available to you and you will gain fitness.

    Who wants to be a snobby roady anyway...to cool or silly to wear a hydro pack!

  22. #22
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    cx is fun. the only thing id ditch my road bike for is a cx bike!

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by scjohn
    From where live I can choose routes from 12 to 40 miles that are half paved and half vineyard access roads.
    Sounds about right for a CX bike.

    As said, I don't have a road bike. But next time I have the funds for another bike, it must be something that works at speed on pavement. I have lots of options for paved country roads and they are not too bad on my Suburban Assault Vehicle. I am sure better aerodynamics (low riding position) and lighter, better rolling, tires and wheels would make them a blast.

    I don't care if it would make me more fit. I just believe I'd enjoy it.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Petese
    Many MTB racers, by virtue of the courses that they must ride, are predominantly slow -twitchers, just like distance runners. They are not sprinters.

    Conversely, many road racers/tracks racers are predominantly fast-twitchers, just the opposite of what is desirable for distance running.

    Your analogy is seriously flawed.

    Effort-wise, road riding is either easier, or harder, than mountain biking and depends upon what is being ridden...
    I think almost all cyclists are "slow twichers". When riding road you use the same muscles as mountain to propel yourself forward. As a cyclist the amount of work you can do is related to the amount of 02 and fuel you can supply your muscles. Even while sprinting. If you do some research on it.

  25. #25
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    Thanks everyone,..
    I am thinking of getting a CX bike
    because I don't really like riding my MTB for my commute (I want to save the mileage for trail riding).
    I think a road bike would be a bit inconvenient because sometimes I go in and out of pavements and driveways during my commute.

    Plus, I can probably venture offroad a bit as the CX bike is made for a bit of that.
    I also plan to commute in the rain.

    That and my fitness and sight seeing goals..

    So I am looking at one like this what do you think? (waiting for the next coupon/sale)

    http://www.performancebike.com/bikes..._#ReviewHeader

  26. #26
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    That Fuji does not look bad at all.

    For commuting, fenders can be nice if it ever rains where you live. I cannot see if that bike has mounts for fenders but there are removable ones for that kind of bikes, too, that keep the spray off your face and backside.

    Do you have the possibility to try one for fit?

    A perfect opportunity to post this video again...


    <object width="600" height="338"><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="movie" value="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=11695455&amp;server=vimeo.co m&amp;show_title=1&amp;show_byline=1&amp;show_port rait=0&amp;color=00ADEF&amp;fullscreen=1" /><embed src="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=11695455&amp;server=vimeo.co m&amp;show_title=1&amp;show_byline=1&amp;show_port rait=0&amp;color=00ADEF&amp;fullscreen=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" width="600" height="338"></embed></object><p><a href="http://vimeo.com/11695455">Local trails ala cx</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/user2018660">Andy Wardman</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    A perfect opportunity to post this video again...


    <object width="600" height="338"><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="movie" value="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=11695455&amp;server=vimeo.co m&amp;show_title=1&amp;show_byline=1&amp;show_port rait=0&amp;color=00ADEF&amp;fullscreen=1" /><embed src="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=11695455&amp;server=vimeo.co m&amp;show_title=1&amp;show_byline=1&amp;show_port rait=0&amp;color=00ADEF&amp;fullscreen=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" width="600" height="338"></embed></object><p><a href="http://vimeo.com/11695455">Local trails ala cx</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/user2018660">Andy Wardman</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>
    That guy is hauling some serious ___
    Is that a cyclocross bike? I won't ride it like that but good to know the option is there
    I have to check the performance bike shops to see if they have one I can try.

  28. #28
    local trails rider
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    I believe that bike is an Ibis Hakkalügi CX bike in the Phlegmish Yellow color

    http://www.ibiscycles.com/bikes/hakkalugi/

    ... yep, the guy can ride ...

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

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    hmmm i have not found the best yet

  30. #30
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    I look at road riding from only a commuting perspective (regular road riding is boring to me). I think riding downtown and/or within dense city traffic is almost like riding in the woods (instead of dodging trees and obstacles - you dodge cars and pedestrians).

    If you live near a metro area, sign up for an alleycat bike race and you’ll see what I mean. My blood gets pumping just as much riding in traffic as it does in the woods.

  31. #31
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    +1 for a cross bike. Since purchasing a cross bike my road bike has done nothing but collect dust. Too many gravel roads and grassy lake paths that call my name. On a cross bike any ride can turn in to an adventure. And adventure(and fitness) is why I'm out riding to begin with.

    Coming from mountain biking you may want to look at a cross bike with disc brakes. I really like my discs in rain and snow riding. Something to think about anyway.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by ianick
    +1 for a cross bike. Since purchasing a cross bike my road bike has done nothing but collect dust. Too many gravel roads and grassy lake paths that call my name. On a cross bike any ride can turn in to an adventure. And adventure(and fitness) is why I'm out riding to begin with.

    Coming from mountain biking you may want to look at a cross bike with disc brakes. I really like my discs in rain and snow riding. Something to think about anyway.
    i love my cross bike too

  33. #33
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    Don't like road biking. Call me a whimp, but I'm scared of cars.

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    i ride a niner r.i.p. and a cannondale caad9 roadie. the weather the last 3 weeks has been super rainy for my area, and most trails were closed. the ONLY way to ride was on the road...glad santa brought me a roadie for christmas last year! I also use my roadie to commute and now want a commuter specific bike (oh the slippery path to obsession!). if you need a bike that is a commuter and can take some trails/paths type stuff, the cx bike is definitely the way to go. BUT, the new cx bikes ARE coming with discs, and that is hands down the way to go! nothing worse than trying to get rim brakes to hook up in the rain in rush hour on a 7 lane main road! you might want to take a look at this thing as an alternative. it is new and i have seen no reviews of it yet, but....http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...dtails/sawyer/

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fiendbear
    Road riding sucks! There, I said it. Yes, it's better than not riding. But so what. Sure it will help your "fitness" level. But again, so what.

    I am a roadie of 40 years and mtbr of 20+ years. I also happen to live in a mecca of road riding and within spitting distance of mtb's birthplace. I still have a nice road bike with even nicer wheels and tires, but it gathers dust most of the year and only comes out when the trails are too sloppy to ride. That's it.

    I can ride for hours on end on a mtb bike with loads of vertical, technical, and distance. But when I hop on my road bike, it's like some kind of forced workout at the gym. I can still smoke 95% of the roadies around here, but who cares. The exhilaration is just not there... replaced by rude drivers, traffic, and exhaust fumes.

    To the OP - get yourself a road bike to mix it up a little. Just don't spend too much money, as it too will quickly gather dust...
    This is purely personal opinion.
    There are lots of people who LOVE riding on the road more than in the woods so my advice to you would be to demo/rent or whatever a bike for a weekend or two and see if you actually really enjoy it. If you really like it a lot, then I'm sure you'll justify to yourself spending in the higher end of your price range. If you don't like it, then get something cheaper just for fitness sake. A cross bike with a couple different sets of tires is a great idea!

    Hopefully there are some backroads nearby to get you acquainted with the sport without feeling nervous.

  36. #36
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    One isn't necessarily better than the other. Road or mountain biking will develop different types of fitness. I ride about 75% on the road, maybe 10% on gravel roads and dirt trails, and 5% pure off road mountain biking. Pure mountain biking over logs and through rock gardens is probably the funnest thing to me. However I am in my early 40's, and parts of my body can't take the physical abuse anymore. Things like wrists and the lower back get stressed a lot more off road.
    In general I think one could say that road biking is fairly static, and builds decent endurance and a good aerobic base. I don't know too many people that only do crits everyday or ride only hills etc., there is usually some boring stuff in between. Off road is fairly dynamic, lots of peddling hard and coasting etc. If you have a device that records your heart rate to software you can see it on a graph.
    You can ride your mountain bike on the road also, I used to do it before I bought a road bike. Pretty easy to simulate off road training if you do varying intervals of varying intensity, or hit roads with lots of rollers etc.
    If I were faced with the OP's quandary I'd probably go with a cyclocross bike. That or a rigid 29er with narrow slick tires for running fire roads etc.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoorCyclist
    Thanks everyone,..
    I am thinking of getting a CX bike
    because I don't really like riding my MTB for my commute (I want to save the mileage for trail riding).
    I think a road bike would be a bit inconvenient because sometimes I go in and out of pavements and driveways during my commute.

    Plus, I can probably venture offroad a bit as the CX bike is made for a bit of that.
    I also plan to commute in the rain.

    That and my fitness and sight seeing goals..

    So I am looking at one like this what do you think? (waiting for the next coupon/sale)

    http://www.performancebike.com/bikes..._#ReviewHeader
    STOP! I'm, in general, a newbie CX rider, but I do ride my CX bike 5-7 times a week on MTB trails and road rides. I've done centuries on my CX bike (yes, with knobbies!) - so I may have more miles on my CX bike(s) than your avergae n00b. I am also racing a local series.

    Before you buy a stock'er, especially if you "don't know much about road biking", I would definetely consider building one custom. CX bikes should be fitted to a "T", since you will be taking it off and on road, you want a nice balance between stability, comfort and speed. Do you want a drop bar or do you want to go with a flat bar? There are lot's of choices to be made with a CX bike, and people can get turned off with a stock bike that sometimes limits this - you don't want to buy something, and then have to dump more money into to "make it yours".

    A lot of mountain bikers have a hard time adapting to the narrow road bars. What width would you need? How shallow of a drop or far of a reach would work for you?

    Consider a classic design like a Surly Cross Check, Origin 8, Singular, Pake C'Mute (what I ride), Some or some other classic steel frameset. Since they are steel and a classic design, you aren't stuck to use it for one purpose only in the future. Usually these frames can be converted to touring rigs, commuters, road bikes, single speeds, etc. You also want to consider something that has some nice fat tire clearance.

    You can build a custom for under $1,500 with some decent parts. Get that thing to fit you like a glove and you will ride it for LIFE!

    FWIW - fitness in cycling is a fringe benefit. I think most of us ride for the passion FIRST, not for fitness. Otherwise, if riding was just for fitness - why not just go to the gym or skip rope all day?
    Last edited by Dion; 10-02-2010 at 08:38 AM.

  38. #38
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    Just get a second wheelset for your mountain bike with some skinny tires. Problem solved. Spend the $1,300 on your bike or on another MOUNTAIN bike.
    Quote Originally Posted by anthonys
    Its still just the push of a button away...
    I am no longer a hardtailkid. 2012 Trek Remedy 9!

  39. #39
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    especially with a road bike, the first time you get one its more than likely not going to fit perfect. if you build up one yourself, thats just more pieces that can not fit properly.

    most road shops will swap out stems and bars until you're a bit more dialed in, if you build it up yourself you're on your own.

  40. #40
    the test dummy
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    perttime thats why i don't have a roady lol..... i dont know about any one else but when i go road ridding i always end up doing stair hucks and playing around. thats why i dont have one, the few times i found me self riding one i was off the ground thinking oh $hit that was dumb. but hey if you feel you would enjoy it why not right
    Quote Originally Posted by craftworks750
    Riding a mtb is like a reset button, 10 mins in and there is nothing else in the world that matters.
    my bikes
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    Ben

  41. #41
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    I used to ride my MTB all the time on the road, commuting to work and the like. I thought I should keep my riding position the same to try and simulate the same strains and stresses while training and riding. Then I built another bike for commuting and road riding. I went with a rigid 26" wheeled MTB. It's got semi-slick MTB tires on it, and V brakes. I went a bit nuts with the lightweight parts and it ended up in the low 14lb range, but I just can't bring myself to buy a road bike.

  42. #42
    sometime mtbr
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    I love them both for different rasons and I do them both to make me better at both.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by eugalc
    Don't like road biking. Call me a whimp, but I'm scared of cars.
    I feel the same. The only roads I ride are getting to a trail (I don't drive a car), and during the June 200 mile cancer ride weekend. That's with all the course help and safety. Otherwise, cover me in chicken feathers, i don't trust a single car out there.
    2011 Ride to Conquer Cancer
    Cancer survivor riding in memory of brother.

  44. #44
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    Nothing to feel wimpy about, its a serious, highly dangerous risk. I think the guys out there on 55mph curvy highways with no bike land/shoulder are just asking for it. Depending on where you live, theres usually safe places to ride though. Being on a bicycle in a well planned bike lane is probably safer than being in a car in traffic

  45. #45
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    road bike?

    Yup, CAAD 9, best bang for the buck road rocket period.

    Can be had on the cheap used with 105, very comfortable, extremely stiff and efficient.

    I use mine in the dead of winter when the trails are too wet. Within 10 minutes I'm warmed up as 20+ mph eases me into the zone quickly. It's a total blast but soon gets boring as not many people ride the road when its cold. Yes, its a dust catcher most of the time.

    In my experience trying to duplicate a road bike with a phat frame and slicks just doesn't work. Just not the same as a 16 lb bike with next to no rolling resistance. The physics are all too wrong. Just my experience, yours may be different?

    Now the cross bike IS a great compromise. You get to mount whatever rubber you need, the frame is basically designed for speed. It can be built around 17 lbs with carbon frame, 35c SB8 tires and mid grade parts. Compact crank with 11-36 10 spd just fits a mid cage XT rear derailleur. V brakes beat the crap out of any obsolete cantis. Be prepared to deal with cyclocross purists who will argue this ad nauseum. Whatever. . .

    I have one of each of the above in my collection. The carbon cross bike gets ridden the most. It does everything well enough just up to singletrack and loose over, then it stays home.

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    I tested a cross bike lately, I reached and sustained 23mph
    on a MTB I struggled to keep it at 20mph for any length of time on pavement, without being downhill..

    Climbing was noticably easier on the cross bike roughly 20lbs vs my MTB 30lbs.

    I tried some gravel trail and it wasn't too bad, a little jaring but I wonder if the wheels can take it.. also went by some pavement transition/ramps pretty fast (note, not curbs)
    I noticed the wheel was out of true after my test ride I am not sure if that was there before
    I am interested in purchase but want to know what terrain these kind of bikes can handle.. (wheel limitation mostly)

    I saw the video above but his seems to cost almost 3 times then Fuji I am looking at.

  47. #47
    local trails rider
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    I know that a few guys in my area sometimes take their cross bikes on trails that are much rougher than the ones in the vid. They slow down and pick their lines, though. Sounds like the wheels on that bike are not very good, or they need tuning before you ride them more.

    ... old pic with a somewhat heavy guy on a Kona Jake (nothing fancy). This is not a rough trail but it is the roughest CX singletrack pic I have.


    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  48. #48
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    ^ Is that the correct way to hold the handle bars?

  49. #49
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    There's many options for hand positions on a drop bar. That is the main reason to have one.

    In the pic he has his hands on the brake hoods and a couple of fingers on the brake levers. That is a very common position but perhaps the one where it is easiest to lose your grip too. Getting down into the drops is more secure but also lower. Getting back to the straight part gives you a higher position.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by dixie whiskey
    I look at road riding from only a commuting perspective (regular road riding is boring to me). I think riding downtown and/or within dense city traffic is almost like riding in the woods (instead of dodging trees and obstacles - you dodge cars and pedestrians).
    I love my road bike for getting around town. Passing cars is really fun. I especially like it for getting to the bars. Can't remember the last time I went for a "road ride".

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