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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by girlonbike View Post
    Riding a road bike, you don't have the same kinds of mechanicals; you try to be more aerodynamic; and you certainly don't account for improbable freak storms even though you should. So, your packing is mostly surrounding the mindset of not bonking and repairing flats. I feel for them and would ride like hell to get off the mountain.
    Exactly.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  2. #52
    Gnarly
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    Oh happy day!

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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  3. #53
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    A ton of roadies are ALSO mountain bikers. It is called "being well rounded" as a cyclist in general.

    We are all cyclists. Simple as that.

    Stick together.

    OP, a lot of folks would not self-reflect in an honest way. Good for you for doing so.

    Now go suit up in a spandex outfit and sweep some bike lanes

  4. #54
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    O.P. please tell me...how many negative rep alerts have you gotten after starting this post?

  5. #55
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    Next time, definetly take the kids home, grab the truck, and go save everyone (Joking, You did nothing wrong). Luckily, nobody got hurt. Had somone died then I could understand a guilty conscience, but they didn't and all is good. This thread has given some amusing opinions on spandex, aerodynamics, and mtbr member reputaion.
    If I were riding at elevation in May, I think weather/safety would absolutely be number 1 concern even if that meant bagging a ride because there was weather in the area or wearing a pack.

  6. #56
    Singletrackmac
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryandurepo View Post
    O.P. please tell me...how many negative rep alerts have you gotten after starting this post?
    After reading the first few comments right after I posted, I thought for sure I would have double digit neg reps. However I actually only received 1 neg rep and got 3 or 4 pos reps for admitting I needed to change my attitude.

    I see someone called me out for possibly being a troll, which would make sense to me if this was a road bike web site or forum. I guess they are questioning my intentions when starting this thread which I did myself after reading the first few responses. Then I realized, I basically felt bad for not doing something to help that roadie out and wanted to justify my inaction. Being a mtb website I assumed the responses would be something along the lines of, "yeah serves that skinny tire riding, lycra wearing, road hogging, unprepared roadie right" which might have made me feel better about not helping.

    Since the responses were the exact opposite of what I expected and that I have a great deal of passion for mountain biking and consider other mountain bikers to be somewhat of my peers, I realized that I had the wrong attitude and needed to change it.

    I have to say i have absolutely no desire to road bike for various reasons, but realize that the two types of biking are linked and that many of my friends who mtb and many mountain bikers on this web site also road bike and I should do what I can to help them out when in need.

    As far as why do some mountain bikers like to separate out road from mountain biking and make fun of them; well the best analogy I can give would be like when I was playing rugby in college. We would make fun of lacrosse players for having to wear protective gear and full face masks but weren't allowed to tackle and I know they made fun of us for wearing very short shorts knee high socks and for not being the smartest bunch. However, after our matches on Saturdays, we often found ourselves partying together, making fun of each other and singing songs all in good spirit, because we realized both sports are tough and we ain't that different. Kinda like road and mountain biking.

    As you can see from my signature, I believe mtbing is superior to road biking (JK) and that I like drinking (and quoting movies about the 80's). When I drink, I have fun making fun of others, which I believe is why they call it making fun. As long as it is in good spirit then I think it's all good, so with that said...

    Quote Originally Posted by catsruletn View Post
    And what is with the spandex hate anyway? I love spandex. And I am like 90% mountain biker with an occasional foray into road riding.
    Quote Originally Posted by rallymaniac View Post
    It's called proper tool for proper job. I hate riding in my baggies. They bunch up, they limit my leg movements and get caught up on the seat all the time whenever I stand up for some trail features. But, some people value cool more than comfort, that's ok, but not everyone needs to be cool.
    I wasn't really pointing out the spandex because i have spandex hate, it was more to show that the choice in clothing was not right for negatively changing weather conditions. Personally, I think lycra is awesome. I remember back in the early 90's spandex wearing mountain bikers were quite common. I still think wearing spandex is fine when mtbing, as long as a fanny pack, wrap around oakleys and a helmet with no vizor are worn too like in this radical trek video (I actually had the same exact handle bar extensions as the guy with the fanny pack and i still own my '91 trek 970).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyrlEE9AV58#t=38
    Last edited by singletrackmack; 05-16-2014 at 12:37 PM.
    Get out of the gutter and onto the mountain top.

    "I only had like two winekills captain buzzcooler"

  7. #57
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    Poor roadies… well actually, maybe it serves them right.

    Most of the Sierra gets more snow in May than October. This wasn't a freak storm. It's normal.

  8. #58
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    I think you're overthinking this. I mean...take the "roadie" and the "mountinbiker" nouns out of this and just make it "people." We all have more in common than you think.

    As for your "... I believe mtbing is superior to road biking" statement, that's just weird. They are simply two similar but different activities. But the logical progression from that statement is that mountain bikers are superior to road bikers, and I think it may explain the superior and condescending attitude you displayed in your original post. I mean...how far are you gonna carry this? When you ride past a single speeder walking his bike on a long steep climb, is your way of riding superior to his? Is he unprepared and now subject to derision because he didn't bring along some more gears?

    Roadbike, mountainbike, unicycle, runner, hiker, who cares? You see somebody in a jam, you help em out if and when you can.

    I like the way you came around and changed your view after that first post, which is why I positive rep'd you. Now it's time to just let this go.

  9. #59
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    I like the video. Brings me back.

  10. #60
    Singletrackmac
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    Quote Originally Posted by Centurion_ View Post
    I think you're overthinking this. I mean...take the "roadie" and the "mountinbiker" nouns out of this and just make it "people." We all have more in common than you think.

    As for your "... I believe mtbing is superior to road biking" statement, that's just weird. They are simply two similar but different activities. But the logical progression from that statement is that mountain bikers are superior to road bikers, and I think it may explain the superior and condescending attitude you displayed in your original post. I mean...how far are you gonna carry this? When you ride past a single speeder walking his bike on a long steep climb, is your way of riding superior to his? Is he unprepared and now subject to derision because he didn't bring along some more gears?

    Roadbike, mountainbike, unicycle, runner, hiker, who cares? You see somebody in a jam, you help em out if and when you can.

    I like the way you came around and changed your view after that first post, which is why I positive rep'd you. Now it's time to just let this go.
    Just trying to have some fun with it. As far as mtb being superior to road, I was making fun of my beliefs. Thought the whole rugby vs lacrosse explanation would have cleared that up, but i didn't include a winking smiley face so I can see how that may be confusing. I will add one.

    However, it's let go.
    Get out of the gutter and onto the mountain top.

    "I only had like two winekills captain buzzcooler"

  11. #61
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    Let it go....let it go....


    being a roadie frozen on my bike never bothered me anyway

    Grit, spit, and a whole lot of duct tape!

  12. #62
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    I don't much ride the road anymore as I'm too scared of motorists.

    When I did road ride, I'd nearly always wear a medium sized camelbak. Admittedly, not many other road riders did. In my group at the time, only one other person did.

    I was never a great road rider, but I never had a problem on any ride with a pack on my back...including a century and plenty of 30-60mi rides.

    I suppose most road riders are out to race others or themselves. I can understand not wanting a pack to slow you down any if 'fast' is your primary objective.

    Regardless, I'm fairly certain I'd never give up convenience for an extra few tenths mi average speed though. I like security...

  13. #63
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    I was out for a first time ride up a big mountain pass ride near my home in Utah called the Alpine Loop (very original, I know). We headed up in July while the temps in the valley was mid 90's with clear sun planned for the whole day. Planned to enjoy the cooler mountain temps as we got higher up. I had done lots of riding (mtb and road) for years, but had never done this big loop. It was TOUGH but worth it as I got near the top. Right as we hit the summit though a storm had brewed up on the other side of the mountain and snuck it's way up the canyon on the opposite side of the mountain. We didn't stand a chance. In less than 5 minutes we were slammed by driving rain and hail. We were in nothing but regular kits and were soaked through very quickly. We decided we could either duck into the trees and try to find shelter to pass the storm or bolt down the mountain. Not knowing how long the storm would last, we decided to bolt back down. We were so cold by the bottom our hands could barely squeeze the breaks. Still we were in ok spirits as we just had an easy canyon to ride down and we were home. Then we hit s set of rumble strips and I somehow flatted. We had a spare with us, but it turned out to have a hole in it. Now while we stood there contemplating what to do, the wind and hail started up again. I was shivering pretty hard by now and began to get slurred speech. When right at that minute a guy who had been driving the opposite way pulled around and stooped in front of us. Dude said he was a biker and saw that we could use help. He didn't have a rack on his small car, but we took the bike apart and shoved it in the best we could. I sat in the front seat and he blasted the heater for me. In a few minutes I was feeling better and he dropped me off at my home. Not sure what would have happened if that guy had not stopped when he did.
    I'll be looking to pay it forward when I get the chance. But I did decide that I would always have a weather shell and patch kit when I do long road rides in the mountains.

  14. #64
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    I live in the high mountains also ( Big Bear Lake, Ca), so I know about how the weather can change. It really doesn't matter what your riding when you get caught up in a weird weather pattern, I've been caught out in bad weather on my road bike as well as my mountain bike. In the spring it is wise to watch the weather and dress and prepare appropriately.
    For those who just can't stand road riding or riders, get over it. Most have never made a serious attempt to try it, maybe if they did, they'd get it. I split my time 50/50 between the two, both are awesome and each has its own type of qualities.

  15. #65
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    All this PC crap aside.
    Mountain bikers ime tend to be much better prepared than "roadies".
    I don't care if you are trying to be aero and don't don't think you have the same mechanicals. If you go into the wilderness and this does include mountain passes etc you better be prepared either way for variable weather conditions. If you won't take care of your own safety "STAY AT HOME' and do a spin class.
    Safety and being prepared is you own personal responsibility. Leaving your safety up to passing motorists is a BS way to act.
    Mountain passes don't have freak storms. They have regular alpine weather which could be anything at any time.. I've seen it snow in august for example.
    Flame on I don't care. I live in a mountainous area and and tired of seeing poorly prepared idiots needing rescue AND putting other peoples lives at risk for their bad judgement.

  16. #66
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    Poor roadies… well actually, maybe it serves them right.

    Roadies by nature don't believe in safety. Otherwise they wouldn't take their changes on a bike with a styrofoam helmet surrounded by two ton cars piloted by texting drivers.

  17. #67
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    I think the OP gets it now.
    To those who don't like road riding because of safety issues, I do not feel unsafe while out road riding, sure if you get hit, your going to lose, but you can't think about that. Personally, I have 3 friends that got hit by cars riding off road, one of the cars was a police car(Ford Bronco)

  18. #68
    dcb
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    Well I think the OP has learned from this thread so let's just move on. I started out just mountain biking but as the years progressed I've also taken to the road and to CX racing. I'd stop and help out any roadie or mtb biker having trouble.

    But, if they were on a recumbent or a unicyle I'd keep right on going.... probably give them the finger to. You have to draw the line someplace right?

  19. #69
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    Re: Poor roadies… well actually, maybe it serves them right.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Then how about a frame bag?


    Attachment 893016
    I have recently discovered frame bags. Great solution for carrying some basic supplies like suggested in the thread without much weight or comfort.

    But then again I'm usually the guy with a rack and trunk on a touring bike or similarly over loaded option.

    Sent from my KFTT using Tapatalk 2

  20. #70
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by CBBaron View Post
    I have recently discovered frame bags. Great solution for carrying some basic supplies like suggested in the thread without much weight or comfort.

    But then again I'm usually the guy with a rack and trunk on a touring bike or similarly over loaded option.

    Sent from my KFTT using Tapatalk 2
    That's good on you. There are literally hundreds of different types on Amazon, and one can find a bag to fit their frame/spot nicely IMO, from the main triangle to all the little nooks and crannys that can fit something. I really like my bag that mounts in front of the seatpost, just the right size for my basic tools and a tube (like a seat bag, but closer to the frame and not hanging out).

    A common roadie mindset is this I believe:

    "I'll be riding along with a support van or support stops of some kind"

    "I'll be riding in a big roadie group and someone will have a couple basic tools or supplies"

    Not always the case of course, but on any given day there always seem to be a lot more "big" roadie rides than mountain bike rides and the number of riders is usually significantly more.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by girlonbike View Post
    I ride on the road. I would never carry a backpack. Maybe some arm and leg warmers and a jacket if I thought the weather would warrant it.

    Riding a road bike, you don't have the same kinds of mechanicals; you try to be more aerodynamic; and you certainly don't account for improbable freak storms even though you should. So, your packing is mostly surrounding the mindset of not bonking and repairing flats.
    Backpacks can be a pain on road bikes, or one can raise their bar a bit and take the time to fit a pack for cycling. You have to wear them a good bit lower, not all packs are bike friendly, try before you buy...

    I say, however, that a backpack is not required for what they needed. Rain jackets, windbreakers, fleece jackets and warmers us roadies use have been rediculously thin since the 80's. Even back then, there were seatpacks in which you could store all these items, and you don't need a massive cave. These days, almost every seapack expands 30-100%. Between a jersey pocket and decent seatpack, there is no reason one cannot be completely prepared for a 30ºF drop and change to rain or snow, AND have their gels and nanners, AND a pair of slipcovers or something... I used to have a pair of thin water shoes in my seat pack just for breaks. These guys probably have some great notiion that they are rolling 2mph faster without a large seat pack. No matter, they chose to not be prepared, living in an area where they know they shouldn't roll that dice. Hopefully NOT having an easy out means they will be better prepared next time.

    Sorry, can't sympathize with people that think everything is going to work out ok no matter what, so no need to prepare.

    A properly adjusted brake system on a road bike will lose a good bit of grip, but you can still safely brake. Winter was skills training time back when I raced. Snow, slush, didn't matter, although realistically depth of more than two inches became a chore real fast, and being in the off season meant layoff the cardiio. Fun times learning to finesse the brakes and not go beyond the limits.
    Last edited by Flamingtaco; 05-19-2014 at 11:54 PM. Reason: Derp.

  22. #72
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    non life threatening situation, your car was full, starbucks 1 mile away?
    you did nothing wrong.

  23. #73
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    No, it's not common for road riders to think that " there is a support van" or " support stops" or that someone else will have what I need. It seems like in this case it was a rider who just got caught out in bad weather. I wonder how many mountain bikers were caught out in the same storm? Living in the mountains, storms sometimes do un expectantly blow in and I have personally been caught out in some both on and off road.
    We really need to cut this " us against them" mentally. If you don't riding the road, don't like wearing Lycra, that's fine, don't do it.
    Years ago, I used to race downhill, XC and road, sometimes some of the very people who I would race dh against would see me on my XC or road bike and would make comments about my "gay" Lycra, then a race would come along and I would kick there arses because I was way fitter and could pedal much of the dh course, basically, moral to the story is, riding road or XC will make any facet of your riding way better.

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by DethWshBkr View Post
    Riding a road bike while carrying a backpack?

    Talk about not an enjoyable ride at all. Carring pounds of crap on a mountain bike is nothing, carrying anything other than the basic water bottle and tubes/tools in an under saddle pack on a road bike is pretty much miserable.
    Fair enough, just don't complain when you are freezing your ass off on the side of the road.

  25. #75
    wg
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    Random ramblings...
    My primary riding is MTB but also have and enjoy a roadie that I've ridden in the Tahoe area. In today's age its really easy to look at a weather app to anticipate what one will encounter. Then, quick changes happen up there all the time. Be ready. Been on rides where the temp will vary by 30 degrees. I've heard that there is no bad weather, just bad choice in gear.

    I have encountered more roadies than MTB riders with no tools or lack of gear. It doesn't take much space to drop a basic mini-tool, spare link and a couple tubes and pump on the bike. I'm not talking about new riders either. Its a different mind set for the skinny tire set. Last dude had tube but no frigging pump.....or CO2. WTF? Helping him out gave me an excuse to take a break on the climb though.
    Don't harsh my mello

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