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  1. #1
    Witty McWitterson
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    Passionate Photogs! Need advice!

    I've got a nice chunk of spending $$$(sold a bike) and I want to buy a Dslr---finally---. I've been watching ebay and I think that's where I'll do the deed.I'm an amature, that's for sure, but I want to pick up some good skills at this photography thing. I think I've got a pretty good eye for the subject sooo, I'm gonna give it a go w/some nice equipment. Keep that right there in mind. My question is, I've got roughly $700 to play with.

    I've narrowed the purchase down to two cameras. A Nikon D50 or a D70. The D50 I'd get new w/kit lense and maybe a 70-300 if the right sale pops up. the D70 would most likely be used, but those are still fetching over 7 bills. At my experience level(rookie, remember?), would the D50 be able to grow with me? Or do I hold out for a decently priced D70?
    Just a regular guy.

  2. #2
    Keep The Rubber Side Down
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    have you posted this question over in PhotographyREVIEW.com??
    Some of my happiest memories in life took place on my bicycles. - Me

  3. #3
    Witty McWitterson
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    Prior to the D50 coming out, i have. I'm looking for MTBr experience though as it will be used for biking hsots as well as landscapes and such.
    Just a regular guy.

  4. #4
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    I don't know much about the D50, but the D70 is a really good camera. I'm not super familiar with Nikon at all, but I did use one a few times, and it takes great pics.

    Not entirely related to the question, but... when I was about to get a new camera I was worried about going with a DSLR and a different brand over a P&S and a brand that I knew really well. Both cameras were about evenly priced. I regret not getting the better camera, because now I have a P&S, which works great, but isn't a DSLR. So, unless you find a great deal, or really just want a camera now, I'd say maybe wait a bit and see if a good sale comes up. But, you may also have a hard time finding the D70 for that cheap as well.

  5. #5
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    $700= helmet cam with HD storage! Takes stills too.

  6. #6
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    d50

    I'm currently saving up for a d70s but I'm considering getting the d50.
    Why do I want a d70s and not the 50? The biggest reason is my CF card is not compatible with the 50 (it uses SD). It also has a couple other features that the 50 doesn't have, the biggest being 1/4000 versus the 1/8000th shutter speeds. The 70 feels a little better in the hand and has the solid feel, while the 50 seems ever so slightly different. Another reason I'm leaning towards the 70 is the controls are similar to my film N80. The 50 has one dial where the 70 has two (like my n80) and I wouldn't have to relearn the dials so much.

    The differences are petty for me, so I suggest getting the 50. It's darn near a 70 already.

    The d50 is a great camera and I suggest getting it for your first good SLR. It will do many tasks well. Remember, they don't ship with memory, you have to buy it extra.

    Word of caution on buying a camera from ebay. It is rife with con men, especially the cameras. Many cameras sold as new on ebay don't have a warranty valid in the US. It's called a grey market camera. They also sometimes just sell the camera, and not the charger etc... Just be careful.

    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/comp..._d70s&show=all
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  7. #7
    MTB B'dos
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    Quote Originally Posted by striker
    I'm currently saving up for a d70s but I'm considering getting the d50.
    Why do I want a d70s and not the 50? The biggest reason is my CF card is not compatible with the 50 (it uses SD).
    Don't know that the compatability of media is what I'd be worried about, more that I prefer CF media - more options available IMHO.

    It also has a couple other features that the 50 doesn't have, the biggest being 1/4000 versus the 1/8000th shutter speeds.
    Oh yeh that's something huge, I always use 1/8000th shutter speed Seriously, have you ever used a shutter speed over 2,000th ? I know I never have, especially not when shooting action sports or else you just stuff that looks like it was posed - you need action/movement in the wheels/arms or legs to imply the motion/speed of whatever you're photographing.

    As for the camera the D50 seems to be a decent camera on paper, but if it were me (I chose the D70s over the D2* 'cause the price diff wasn't a mere $200 it was almost 2k + diff) I'd wait for a D70s - AND not off Ebay since as mentioned you can get easily ripped off.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
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  8. #8
    Hey, wait up!
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    Me 2

    I'm also thinking about a nice DSLR. I already have a Nikon F-100 SLR and lenses, so I'm thinking between the D50 and D70 since the lenses should match up.

    What I've read in the mags indicates the D50 has some tech applications that are more refined than the D70 and that the D70 has some features that are not on the D50. For general bike shots, it looks like the D50 would be more than adequate.

    My question however is: My Sony Cybershot has this maddening habit of pausing significantly between pushing the button and taking the shot. I've not seen a clear answer as to whether a DSLR such as the D50 or D70 has an instantaneous release of the "shutter" when you push the button. I would appreciate any real world report on this question.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~martini~
    I've got a nice chunk of spending $$$(sold a bike) and I want to buy a Dslr---finally---. I've been watching ebay and I think that's where I'll do the deed.
    JMHO, but anyone who buys expensive electronics off of EBAY is criminally insane. You have absolutely no idea of how the camera was treated. Also because of the time decay value inherent in electronics, many supposed great buys are anything but that, with prices falling all of the time. Add in the fact that it may not have a warrantly......see where I am going with this?

  10. #10
    MTB B'dos
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    Quote Originally Posted by LCdaveH
    My question however is: My Sony Cybershot has this maddening habit of pausing significantly between pushing the button and taking the shot. I've not seen a clear answer as to whether a DSLR such as the D50 or D70 has an instantaneous release of the "shutter" when you push the button. I would appreciate any real world report on this question.
    I can only answer for the D70s and say that there is a very miniscule delay, definitely not as fast as the F100 (which I also own). Also another thing the 3 FPS advertised is more like 2.5 FPS, and when actually trying to use it it seems like 1-2 FPS. I'm personally thinking already (got the D70s in Sept) of getting a D200 w/ 5 FPS and some other features, as using the D70s for sequential shooting when you're accustomed to real 5 FPS of the F100 is a bit maddening.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
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  11. #11
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    I have a D50, it is my first DSLR and one feature the the D70s has that I do miss is the backlit info LCD on top of the camera. I have had autofocus issues, first camera I got would not autofocus at all, they replaced it and occasionally the new one gets really finicky about focusing and can be frustrating. I do suggest getting one of the Speedlight flashes for it, I got the SB 600 and it makes a world of differences in your shots.

  12. #12
    Witty McWitterson
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    Thanks all for the advice! I hear ya about the crooks out there too. I generally wouldn't buy electronics from private parties, but in the cases where I have(GPS and PDA), the items in question were delivered fine and worked as advertised. Yes, gambling, but I'm not one to look so pessimistically on society. I'm not naive though either.

    Something like this camera, I'll only buy from shops. And that's what I did. Cord Camera and the D50. Looked over thier website and they've gotten pretty good reviews. Mainly what I was after was the extended warranty. And that I got. I'm not so concerned w/memory. I know it doesn't come w/the camera. Besides. Its sooper cheap these days. I wanted CF, but to get that, I'd have to wait for a D70 to show up used, and buy from a private seller. Something this expensive, I don't think I'd go that way.

    I did go into the local Best Buy today and played w/a D50 they had on the floor. Felt good in the hand, seemed pretty intuitive to get aroundmanus and such. Since they're roughtly in the same league I picked up a a 350D too. Felt cheap and plasticy in comparison. And too small for my hands. Didn't like it all. I also looked at the 20D. THAT was a nice shooter. The FPS was much higher than any other camera I looked at. Impressive. It too felt good to hold.

    I'll post shots and such once I get it!
    Just a regular guy.

  13. #13
    Young, Shawn Young
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    I have a D50 that I use for mountain biking. Using the straps on my Hawg Camelbak and the camera bag I secure it pretty well to the top of the bag. Its my first dslr and Im learning as I go. Im using the 18-70 nikor lens but If the 80-200 VR lens would have been out at the time I would have purchased that instead. That said I love this camera and Im just scratching the surface of what it can do for now. Samples here: http://bigfoot.smugmug.com/gallery/715008/1/31264451

    Theres a couple other galleries in there as well of Fruita, Flagstaff, local Cowbot trails. Take a look.

    Shawn
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  14. #14
    AlexIsFubar
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    i've been in photography for over 5 years. D50 with an 70-300mm? bad idea. at least 4 your purposes (bike shots). unless u want to use in general. anyway, the 70-300 is a powerful zoom lens (i got it on my film F80) with big range of action. BUT - while on a trail, even working at 70mm, is too much! better begin with a lens covering the 24 - 70 or 80mm range,it's ideal for your purposes and skills. anything above 100mm would be useful for shooting subjects as far as 500 ft !!! the D50 is a very good DSLR, which will serve you well for at least 5 years under all conditions. hope i helped...

  15. #15
    Complete Bastard
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    I shot nikon equipment professionally for several years as an advertising and public relations photographer and loved their pro stuff (D1x and F100). If you already own nikon lenses, that's how I would go. If you don't, then I'd buy canon. Their consumer offerings are a bit better than nikon and it seems that nikon is constantly playing catchup with canon. Just my professional opinion. I still shoot older nikon pro bodies myself. F3 and F4.

  16. #16
    Young, Shawn Young
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexisfubar
    i've been in photography for over 5 years. D50 with an 70-300mm? bad idea. at least 4 your purposes (bike shots). unless u want to use in general. anyway, the 70-300 is a powerful zoom lens (i got it on my film F80) with big range of action. BUT - while on a trail, even working at 70mm, is too much! better begin with a lens covering the 24 - 70 or 80mm range,it's ideal for your purposes and skills. anything above 100mm would be useful for shooting subjects as far as 500 ft !!! the D50 is a very good DSLR, which will serve you well for at least 5 years under all conditions. hope i helped...
    My bad on that, its 18-200VR. Its just coming out and is as hot a lens as there is right now
    "Im just going to explore a little bit..."

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  17. #17
    Witty McWitterson
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    I've held a few canon's, and they're just uncomfortable in my hands. The body/handle is just too small for my big hands. I can't find biking gloves that fit to save my life either(use construction gloves for riding)!
    Just a regular guy.

  18. #18
    AlexIsFubar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redmon
    My bad on that, its 18-200VR. Its just coming out and is as hot a lens as there is right now
    well,the thing is...the VR 18-200 is not supported by the D50 or the D70. i think it's only for the D200

  19. #19
    Young, Shawn Young
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexisfubar
    well,the thing is...the VR 18-200 is not supported by the D50 or the D70. i think it's only for the D200
    Thats simply not true. But it is a bit heavier from what Ive read. I love the 18-70 lens for most applications(for what my shooting style is). To each their own.

    ps- you can find numerous peeps shooting the 18-200 on D70s' on Dpreview.
    Last edited by Redmon; 12-30-2005 at 04:22 PM.
    "Im just going to explore a little bit..."

    Dont make me be the bad guy...

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  20. #20
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    Camera bodies will come and go, but lenses will generally remain with you far longer. The D50 is fine for a starter DSLR.

    If you are going to invest is camera gear, lenses are where it's at. A great lens on a mediocre camera will yield better results in most conditions than a mediocre lens on a great camera. If you are happy with the results from your point and shoot and really only want enhanced performance, then mediocre lenses may be all you want. If you are expecting significantly improved output, then be prepared to shell out for excellent lenses. That said, there are some excellent lenses that don't cost an arm and a leg, but you have to do your homework to know what they are.

    Even though I have been a Canon shooter for many years and have no inclination to switch, I agree with you regarding the ergonomics of the Canon 350 XT. It's just too small without a grip. My pinkie was left hanging in space and I just didn't care for it.

    You will find the shutter lag much more to your liking with a DSLR.

    The D50 should be great for you IF you take the time to learn to use it properly. If you don't get great results right away, don't blame the gear. Look into the mirror to see the problem.

    Congrats and looking forward to seeing some pics from your new rig.

    Regards,
    Jeff

  21. #21
    PCC
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    I have to agree with the above post: I've always been a proponent of buying the best glass you can afford then buy the best camera body to go with it.

    I own a D70 and my cousin owns a 20D. When he got it I kept telling him that he should buy Nikon because he has had Nikon equipment in the past but he no longer owns anything Nikon (except for a digital P.S.) so his decision to go Canon was based on the magazine write-ups and the megapixel count. The thing is he called me the other night asking if I liked the image quality from my D70 and the 18-70 lens. Absolutely! When I asked him why he was asking me this he answered that he thought he was doing something wrong with his camera until he spent a boatload of money on a high-end zoom lens and realised that his problems stemmed from both the kit lens (18-55) and the other zoom he bought for his camera (not sure what it was but it was the cheapest lens made by Canon).

    My other lenses are old fixed focal Nikkors from back in the early 70s that will only work in fully manual non-metered mode on the D70 (they work great on my old FE-2). This is not a problem because digital allows me to hunt for the correct exposure and I use this equipment for macro purposes on the digital domain anyway.
    Last edited by PCC; 12-30-2005 at 08:51 PM.

  22. #22
    Mouse's Mom
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    Canon!!!!! 10D is a great starter camera if you're shooting sports in good light. There is a lot of noise in low light situations shooting at 1600, though. If you want to spend more money, get the 20D. The quality is unbelievable. If you want to see for yourself, go to my site www.JodyGomez.com and check out my shots. All shot with 20D except the jr bullriding, which was shot with the 10D.

    I won't shoot anything but Canon.

    Just my two cents.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ~martini~
    I've got a nice chunk of spending $$$(sold a bike) and I want to buy a Dslr---finally---. I've been watching ebay and I think that's where I'll do the deed.I'm an amature, that's for sure, but I want to pick up some good skills at this photography thing. I think I've got a pretty good eye for the subject sooo, I'm gonna give it a go w/some nice equipment. Keep that right there in mind. My question is, I've got roughly $700 to play with.

    I've narrowed the purchase down to two cameras. A Nikon D50 or a D70. The D50 I'd get new w/kit lense and maybe a 70-300 if the right sale pops up. the D70 would most likely be used, but those are still fetching over 7 bills. At my experience level(rookie, remember?), would the D50 be able to grow with me? Or do I hold out for a decently priced D70?
    http://www.JodyGomez.com Someone please teach me to shoot!

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  23. #23
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    Olympus EVolt E-300 ??

    Disclaimer: I know almost nothing about digital slr cameras. However, I have been interested in them and have been doing a bit of research. Anyhoo, you might take a look at the Olympus EVolt E-300. Retails for $799 and was rated tops by PC World, FWIW.

    Anyone have any experience with this camera?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob
    Disclaimer: I know almost nothing about digital slr cameras. However, I have been interested in them and have been doing a bit of research. Anyhoo, you might take a look at the Olympus EVolt E-300. Retails for $799 and was rated tops by PC World, FWIW.

    Anyone have any experience with this camera?
    The E-300 has been out since 9-04 which is kind of long in the tooth for digital cameras and has been replaced by the E-500.

    Here is a review of the E-300 from dpreview

    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympuse300/

    or you can go straight to the summary:

    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympuse300/page29.asp

    Especially if you are a "contrarian" type and want to have something other than Canon or Nikon, the newer E-500 may be worth a look (as low as $619 from buydig), but I would pass on the E-300 at this time. The biggest issues I would have about not going with either Canon or Nikon would be the smaller choice of available lenses (and other accessories too) and the resale value of that entire system down the road. But it does appear to be a decent system.

    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympuse500/

    Regards,

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by pedaler845
    $700= helmet cam with HD storage! Takes stills too.
    The crappiest stills possible. A digital video camera can't replace a good still camera. And the best digital camera with video can't replace a real video camera.
    Back of the camera, back of the pack.

  26. #26
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    i completely agree with jeffj's post about the importance of a good lens. especially with shooting action sports. after a year of using nikon's 24-120 vr 3.5-5.6 (aperature) lens i really wish i would have ponied up for the constant 2.8 aperture equivalent. ya want the best light, you go out in the early morning / late evening. i can't begin to count the number of times i wished i could open up the aperture just a few more stops in order to shoot that faster shutter needed to capture a non-blurred rider in those low light conditions.

    go with the glass and either camera will most likely work fine for you.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~martini~
    I've got a nice chunk of spending $$$(sold a bike) and I want to buy a Dslr---finally---. I've been watching ebay and I think that's where I'll do the deed.I'm an amature, that's for sure, but I want to pick up some good skills at this photography thing. I think I've got a pretty good eye for the subject sooo, I'm gonna give it a go w/some nice equipment. Keep that right there in mind. My question is, I've got roughly $700 to play with.

    I've narrowed the purchase down to two cameras. A Nikon D50 or a D70. The D50 I'd get new w/kit lense and maybe a 70-300 if the right sale pops up. the D70 would most likely be used, but those are still fetching over 7 bills. At my experience level(rookie, remember?), would the D50 be able to grow with me? Or do I hold out for a decently priced D70?
    Don't take this as the basic Ford vs. Chevy sort of argument because my wife and I have and like all of our Canon and Nikon stuff. I use a lot of photo gear in my work, and in all honesty think the popular brands all have good stuff, but I give Canon and Nikon the edge for lenses and flash systems. That should only influence you if you plan to buy into a broad array of stuff.

    If you already have worthy items from a system that you'll honestly use with a new purchase then economics say go with that brand.

    I started looking at D70S, D50 and 20D, but found I got the most in my CamelBak and most for my money with Canon XT, 17-85 IS USM lens. I liked D70 more than D50, but owning CF cards may have influenced that.

    I believe D50 did not have a backlit screen, and I sure have used that.

    I took a lot of test shots with different cameras too. The extra cropping power of the Canons made a difference, I liked my high ISO test shots more, and the 17-85 IS USM lens was a deal breaker. The only people who will tell you that 6 vs. 8 megapixels is not significant are people who do not ever crop or have the extra megapixels.

    Both platforms have a lot of great items and I suggest taking real life test shots. It's hard to shoot bikes in action at a camera store, but you can shoot cars driving by, and that helped me go for the IS w/ ring USM lens.

    One way or another I suggest the hands on testing, and shooting things in motion and low light with an IS (VR) and ring USM lens, and seeing how much capability fits in your CamelBak with the XT and 17-85 kit.

    Bottom line for me: Nikons were pleasant to hold, and I already knew their menus and buttons, but actual shooting and the 17-85 lens changed my purchase plans. Bottom line in general is each of the digi SLR makers have good stuff. As far as eBay and holding out I suggest holding out for the 6 figure money earner with gottahaveit syndrome who will trade their XT for 5D and 17-85 for an L lens.

    I also suggest you keep money for a good external flash in your budget.

    Good luck!

  28. #28
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    The one thing I don't think anyone has pointed out, is that save for the higher end models, most dslr's magnify you lens by 1.6, so for what its worth a 70-300 will be equivalent to 112-480.

    That said, and since you've already made your purchase, you can't go wrong with either Canon or Nikon.

    I've used both for film, but more recently have been using canon, so I went with the Canon 20D back in September, and I absolutely love it.

    Someone on here mentioned that their cousin had issues with the canon but the nikon is great. I've now shot with both, my 20D, my father in laws digital rebel (not the xt) and my inlaws who have both the nikon D50 and D70, and ALL take excellent pictures. Unfortunately, the lenes they tend to put on these cameras in bundles are $100 lenses, and perform like it.

    A good lens for any camera makes a difference. But even a good lens can't help someone who doesn't know what they're doing. I shoot with mid quality lenses, canon's and sigma's, in the $500 to $800 range, and don't have any issues, including printing up to 13"x19", though I will spend a bit more for a faster lens, mainly because I do a lot of low light stuff.
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  29. #29
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    Shutter-Lag

    Quote Originally Posted by LCdaveH
    My question however is: My Sony Cybershot has this maddening habit of pausing significantly between pushing the button and taking the shot. I've not seen a clear answer as to whether a DSLR such as the D50 or D70 has an instantaneous release of the "shutter" when you push the button. I would appreciate any real world report on this question.
    That's what we call "shutter-lag." Technically it exists in all cameras. But you won't notice it on a digital SLR. It's one of the most noticeable and immediate benefits of making the upgrade. Digital SLRs also have large buffers so that there is no shot-to-shot delay - at least until you fill up the buffer.
    Back of the camera, back of the pack.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~martini~
    I've held a few canon's, and they're just uncomfortable in my hands. The body/handle is just too small for my big hands. I can't find biking gloves that fit to save my life either(use construction gloves for riding)!
    I got used to the small body size in a day, and don't even think about it unless I use my wife's 35mm body. D70 didn't pack as well as D50 which didn't pack as well as XT. I actually took two packs into the camera store. The frequent talk about the ergonomics of cameras kind of silly to me. I still use 30-52 year old cameras, and I can't say those designs addressed ergonomics, and they've taken some mighty find images. Then there are my pocket sized point and shoots...

    Photography is about getting light to the image plane. That means a lens is as important as ever, but digital changes that a bit. That had an influence regarding my switch to Canon because Canon makes their own higher megapixel sensors (the image plane), and is doing it at a better price. I could crop 1/4 of an image from 8 megapixel cameras and make a surprisingly good 8x10 print.

    Back to lens, and you have Canon making the fast focusing and versitile 17-85 IS USM. Nikon's 24-120mm f/3.5-5.6 IF-ED AF-S VR has to be considered a winner or contender there, but do the crop factor math and you have a very bike and woods and trail friendly item with the 17-85. I hope that makes sense where D50 plus 24-120mm f/3.5-5.6 IF-ED AF-S VR to XT plus 17-85 IS USM gets you backlight body, more pixels, and 6 very usable mm (remember to multiply by 1.5 and 1.6).

    If you're not in a hurry go to a camera store with memory cards or a thumb drive and test stuff.

    Good luck.

  31. #31
    Witty McWitterson
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    Ya, I'm already looking at an SB-600 flash unit. I know I won't be happy with the camera's flash when it comes down to it. I'm also scoping out the future lense options too. Price/value is gonna be a tough one though. I may have to sell another bike just to get into the glass game....Not so sure I want to go there yet. We'll see how well I can take pictures first. I may suck at it!

    Status:
    In Transit -
    On Time

    Scheduled Delivery: 01/05/2006
    Shipped to: VIROQUA, WI, US
    Shipped or Billed on: 01/03/2006
    Tracking Number: 1Z
    Service Type: GROUND
    Weight: 7.60 Lbs
    Note: Your package is in the UPS system and is on time with a scheduled delivery date of 01/05/2006.

    Package Progress:

    Location Date Local Time Activity
    OAK CREEK, WI, US 01/04/2006 9:18 P.M. DEPARTURE SCAN
    01/04/2006 2:25 P.M. ARRIVAL SCAN
    HODGKINS, IN, US 01/04/2006 11:53 A.M. DEPARTURE SCAN
    01/04/2006 10:04 A.M. ARRIVAL SCAN
    MAUMEE, OH, US 01/04/2006 6:55 A.M. DEPARTURE SCAN
    01/04/2006 1:11 A.M. ARRIVAL SCAN
    COLUMBUS, OH, US 01/03/2006 10:37 P.M. DEPARTURE SCAN
    01/03/2006 7:11 P.M. ORIGIN SCAN

    Yep. I'll be getting it tomorrow! Heheee! can't wait!
    Just a regular guy.

  32. #32
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    Congratulatiopns - and a suggestion

    Congratulations on the D50. I'm sure you'll be more than happy - until you see a D200

    I don't know if you've seen it mentioned, but Nikon recently announced a 18-200mm VR lens. By the specs, this looks to me like the ultimate riding lens. I've been carrying a fisheye and Canon 28-135mm IS or 28-75mm f/2.8 Tamron when I ride. The new Nikkor is supposed to already be available. If the optics are decent it should be the Holy Grail of mountain biking lenses - at least when it comes to riding with a digital SLR. The battle between camera size, weight, and flexibility is an ongoing one. The 18-200mm VR lens makes Nikon look very, very good for mountain bike photography.

    On the other hand, the Olympus Four Thirds System is even smaller and lighter...

    Please post reviews for your photo gear on PhotographyREVIEW.com, after you've had it long enough to know it well.
    Back of the camera, back of the pack.

  33. #33
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    That lens may have changed or delayed my purchase decision if it was available earlier.

    I suggest add the price of that lens, a body and a flash and see how well it fits in a CamelBak or similar. I'm not sure enough people realize how much an external flash will do for them.

  34. #34
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    Backpack

    Quote Originally Posted by bitflogger
    I suggest add the price of that lens, a body and a flash and see how well it fits in a CamelBak or similar. I'm not sure enough people realize how much an external flash will do for them.
    How to carry your camera is the next problem. I have a bunch of hydration packs. The best one I've used is the Deuter Superbike. I just bought a second one after riding with a blown out zipper for a year. I love the fit and I can carry my Canon EOS 10D with 28-135 IS lens, fisheye, flash, and extra batteries, water, tools, food, etc. I really stuff that backpack. But I've never used anything that holds my gear as well and rides as well. There isn't anything I can't ride with that backpack on.
    Back of the camera, back of the pack.

  35. #35
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    Yep. I'm going to have to become a Hydro pack user. Problem is, I can't stand the things. I'll be doing that hunt here soon too.

    Got the camera and have been putzing with it. So far, so good. Easy to use for sure. Image quality compared to my Sony DSC-P92 is WAY better. The kit lense is fine, but I can see why good glass is adicting.
    Just a regular guy.

  36. #36
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    Canon PowerShot S2 IS - thoughts?
    User reviews are good. Magazines seem not too impressed. I don't want to carry lens and $1000 of stuff on my while riding.
    Don't harsh my mello

  37. #37
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    Image Quality

    Quote Originally Posted by ~martini~
    So far, so good. Easy to use for sure. Image quality compared to my Sony DSC-P92 is WAY better. The kit lense is fine, but I can see why good glass is adicting.
    It's a little known fact that digital SLRs have larger pixels than compact digital cameras. The size of the pixel has a larger effect on image quality than the number of pixels. So a 4-megapixel digital SLR will deliver better image quality than an 8-megapixel compact digital camera. Your D50 is gonna blow away any current compact camera. I just did studio tests with the D70s, which I believe uses the same sensor. The ISO 1600 performance is excellent. I was very, very impressed. I imagine your Sony is pretty much unusable over ISO 200.
    Back of the camera, back of the pack.

  38. #38
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    Seen or touched Mountainsmith Quantum pack?

    Quote Originally Posted by Photo-John
    How to carry your camera is the next problem. I have a bunch of hydration packs. The best one I've used is the Deuter Superbike. I just bought a second one after riding with a blown out zipper for a year. I love the fit and I can carry my Canon EOS 10D with 28-135 IS lens, fisheye, flash, and extra batteries, water, tools, food, etc. I really stuff that backpack. But I've never used anything that holds my gear as well and rides as well. There isn't anything I can't ride with that backpack on.
    That pack does not hold a hydro reservoir, but it seems like it could be good for motion and activity compared to most camera packs.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~martini~
    Yep. I'm going to have to become a Hydro pack user. Problem is, I can't stand the things. I'll be doing that hunt here soon too.

    Got the camera and have been putzing with it. So far, so good. Easy to use for sure. Image quality compared to my Sony DSC-P92 is WAY better. The kit lense is fine, but I can see why good glass is adicting.
    Congrats, and have fun learning the features. A kit (and all lens) secret is to shoot stopped down when possible.

  40. #40
    R.I.P. DogFriend
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    Quote Originally Posted by bitflogger
    A kit (and all lens) secret is to shoot stopped down when possible.
    I am at the opposite end of this opinion. I tend to shoot wide open whenever possible unless I require greater depth of the in-focus part of a photo (as in a group or landscape type photo).

    While images do get sharper when most any lens is stopped down, there are many lenses available that will produce fantastic images wide open. Most tend to be more expensive than average so-called 'consumer' or 'kit' lenses, but there are some relative bargains out there that do VERY well wide open.

    I prefer to shoot wide open a majority of the time in order to separate my subject (to one degree or another) from the background. Just depends what you are trying to accomplish. Right now, I won't even take a lens with me that doesn't perform very well wide open and I only have two (out of six) that have apertures smaller than f/2.8.

    If you really do prefer to shoot stopped down most of the time, kit lenses and mid-priced lenses can work very well for you.

    I have posted an example of a picture shot wide open (f/2.8) to render the background out of focus in order to leave no doubt about the subject of the image. If that is something you want, you will need large apertures to do it consistently.

    Not saying it's the only way or always better, just giving another viewpoint. Who knows, maybe it's just my current 'phase'...

    There are several good books available now on digital photography, but one I really recommend is: Understanding Digital Photography by Bryan Peterson. He has another that is very similar and very highly regarded titled: Understanding Exposure. They cover some of the same material, but the first one is directed just at digital photography.

    Regards,
    Jeff
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  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by wg
    Canon PowerShot S2 IS - thoughts?
    User reviews are good. Magazines seem not too impressed. I don't want to carry lens and $1000 of stuff on my while riding.
    I have gotten to the point where I just try to remember stuff.

    Camera gets between myself and the ride (or any experience).

    I only take pictures of my kid or something else unique. i wish i had a DSLR to take pics of my kid, for sure. the shutter lag is so frustrating when a child/baby is moving around.

    Here is a terrifically crappy pic I took while BC skiing on new years eve with my point and shoot. would this have come better with 1000 bucks and a heavy backpack? probably. would I have enjoyed the day more? nope.

    you can sort of almost see our tracks in the middle, which traverse right. image is resized and looks like i took a dump on your screen.

    mtbr bragging rights if you can name where i took this pic.

    Only boring people get bored.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by jh_on_the_cape
    I have gotten to the point where I just try to remember stuff.

    Camera gets between myself and the ride (or any experience).

    I only take pictures of my kid or something else unique. i wish i had a DSLR to take pics of my kid, for sure. the shutter lag is so frustrating when a child/baby is moving around.

    Here is a terrifically crappy pic I took while BC skiing on new years eve with my point and shoot. would this have come better with 1000 bucks and a heavy backpack? probably. would I have enjoyed the day more? nope.
    jh, you make an excellent point. Mountain biking with a dslr has shown me that the dslr is at the very least a distraction. To be honest, taking a dslr anywhere seems to make the trip at least partially about the camera. I would say that I may initially enjoy the day less than I would have without it, but as time goes on I am glad to have excellent rememberances of the less than perfect day.

    Just that you will be much more careful makes things that would normally be a blip suddenly become a minor PITA. Water crossings especially come to mind. I won't even take a moderate chance on dunking $2K+ worth of gear.

    It's a decision everyone has to make for themselves and it can impact an entire group's ride. I usually only bring it when I am welcome to by the other riders or when I am by myself and will not be bothered by the distraction. I don't bring the dslr most of the time I ride by myself either.

    Regards,
    Last edited by jeffj; 01-06-2006 at 08:47 PM. Reason: left out a word...

  43. #43
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    Stopping Down

    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj
    I am at the opposite end of this opinion. I tend to shoot wide open whenever possible unless I require greater depth of the in-focus part of a photo (as in a group or landscape type photo).
    I shoot with a large aperture most of the time, too. I like to use selective focus with shallow depth-of-field, in order to isolate my subject - as you've done in your photo. Stopping down can tend to make cluttered photos. Although the best image quality is usuallly somewhere between f/5.6 and f/11. I don't actually shoot wide open, though. I like to stop down at least one stop. Image quality at the largest aperture is usually not the best - even with the best of lenses.
    Back of the camera, back of the pack.

  44. #44
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    What I meant in the post was that you will not see faults or see them less when stopped down compared to an expensive lens.

    Example: I have two 35mm primes, on different cameras sytems, but the inexpensive Canon 35 f2 holds its own against the other when stopped down a bit.


  45. #45
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    Reply to the carry stuff, all-in-one camera post and check out Photo John's site.

    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj
    jh, you make an excellent point. Mountain biking with a dslr has shown me that the dslr is at the very least a distraction. To be honest, taking a dslr anywhere seems to make the trip at partially about the camera. I would say that I may initially enjoy the day less than I would have without it, but as time goes on I am glad to have excellent rememberances of the less than perfect day.

    Just that you will be much more careful makes things that would normally be a blip suddenly become a minor PITA. Water crossings especially come to mind. I won't even take a moderate chance on dunking $2K+ worth of gear.

    It's a decision everyone has to make for themselves and it can impact an entire group's ride. I usually only bring it when I am welcome to by the other riders or when I am by myself and will not be bothered by the distraction. I don't bring the dslr most of the time I ride by myself either.

    Regards,
    I still get miles out of my Zoom WR (water resistant) Pentax 35mm point and shoot. These can be at on eBay for less than $30 at times. They are digital if you consider an extra few bucks for 2-3 megapixel images with your film processing, or a low cost scanner I have had a great time with mine (below), and am only selling it because I have a job ahead that requires a pro model. Same scanner is only $119 new.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...MESE%3AIT&rd=1

    The WR90s vignette a bit at wide angle, but getting one for cheap buys a lot of utility.

    Another great solution is a Canon digi elph with their all weather and waterproof cases. I had such case with my last elph, but just bag my new one and have reverted to carrying the film Pentax because fast film outperforms the little digicams in low light.

    FYI: Bikers might like Photo John's own site and cameracourage.com.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx
    Don't know that the compatability of media is what I'd be worried about, more that I prefer CF media - more options available IMHO.
    I would go with a camera that suports SD cards, I think SD is faster than CF, and supports also CF cards.

  47. #47
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    Nice!

    Quote Originally Posted by bitflogger

    FYI: Bikers might like Photo John's own site and cameracourage.com.
    Thanks, buddy! I need to go check out Josh's site. It's been a while.
    Back of the camera, back of the pack.

  48. #48
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    I'd go for Canon if i were you(I use a Canon EOS 20D). If you don't want to go Canon then go Nikon. Definately do not go for the Olympus. It's a 2.0 crop sensor so the low light performance and overall image quality is not up there with the Canon or Nikon.
    You can check out some photographs I took with the Canon EOS 20D with the basic cheap $100 18-55 f/3.5-5.6 kit lens at www.xanga.com/nviati

  49. #49
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    Olympus

    He already bought a D50. But I really like the Olympus. I've used an E1 extensively. The size of the sensor doesn't make any difference for low light photography and the Olympus E-System lenses are awesome. The best thing about that system is the small size of the camera and lenses. The small sensor means that lenses can be twice as powerful and even the low end ones have very fast apertures. I think the E-System is a great choice for people who want to ride with a digital SLR.
    Back of the camera, back of the pack.

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