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  1. #1
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    Mtn Biker Attitudes

    I've been away from biking for a while now. I had been running a lot in the past 6 years and have to look at biking again due to an injury. I have tried to ask questions at my local Colorado bike shop. I live in Vail and thought people would be open to talk about their sport. The people in the shop look at me like I am a freak. What's up with that? Maybe I'm asking off the wall questions a mtn biker would already know. I DON'T! I buy a bike with the hopes of riding with people of the same interests. So I ride alone. I see other riders on the trail and try to engage in friendly conversation...NOTHING! Not a, "great day isn't it." Sure I don't have the fancy equipment. I've got a bike, helmet, hydration pack, and a great attitude.

    So I ask, If you run into a rider on the trail or at the trailhead, what do you say? Do you invite them to ride with you? Do you all have this attitude if the other person doesn't have the fancy equipment, you don't say crap?

    Someone shed some light! I live in the middle of the mountains and thought this would be easy.

    Scott

  2. #2
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    don't worry about it or give it a second thought. you said "hi" cuz that's how you roll now enjoy YOUR ride.

  3. #3
    Ride Responsibly
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    Give it some time. Most the people I meet are friendly.

  4. #4
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    I'm guessing your situation might have been made worse by your location and/or LBS' general attitude in combination with the location. Not all places/LBSs are like that. Where I live in PA, if you see someone else on a mtb you ride over and talk to them and most are pretty decent discussing favorite trails, their ride, gear, etc.

    I'm not so sure about a place like Vail though. It sounds like at least some of those guys out there with the expensive gear who won't talk to you might be all-show, no-go posers. Who needs 'em anyway?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by scmpeters
    I've been away from biking for a while now. I had been running a lot in the past 6 years and have to look at biking again due to an injury. I have tried to ask questions at my local Colorado bike shop. I live in Vail and thought people would be open to talk about their sport. The people in the shop look at me like I am a freak. What's up with that? Maybe I'm asking off the wall questions a mtn biker would already know. I DON'T! I buy a bike with the hopes of riding with people of the same interests. So I ride alone. I see other riders on the trail and try to engage in friendly conversation...NOTHING! Not a, "great day isn't it." Sure I don't have the fancy equipment. I've got a bike, helmet, hydration pack, and a great attitude.

    So I ask, If you run into a rider on the trail or at the trailhead, what do you say? Do you invite them to ride with you? Do you all have this attitude if the other person doesn't have the fancy equipment, you don't say crap?

    Someone shed some light! I live in the middle of the mountains and thought this would be easy.

    Scott
    WTF! Go f-yourself we don't have a bad attitude! Kidding, sounds like what will hopefully be just some isolated incidents.

  6. #6
    Tigers love pepper...
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    People are idiots. Try a different shop. Thankfully we had a few really good shops in town when I started out and was a complete newb.

    If you ever come over to ride Fruita/GJ, PM me and I'll ride with you.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by scmpeters
    So I ask, If you run into a rider on the trail or at the trailhead, what do you say? Do you invite them to ride with you? Do you all have this attitude if the other person doesn't have the fancy equipment, you don't say crap?
    I say "hey" and that's about it. If they're looking at a map, I offer some suggestions of some good trails (depending on what they are looking for). Normally, I'm on a training ride, so I keep my chit-chat to a minimum until I'm finished accomplishing what I need to do.

    Sometimes I get dirty looks, especially if I drop another rider on a hill. I'm a bigger guy, so they probably are expecting me to stop, gasping for air. OR... a svelte rider with an MTBR jersey looking like he's carved out of wood, I simply say, "go ahead..." and wave them by on a climb.

    My rides are short and intense (like an angry midget) and socializing may be for another time, or when I'm done. Some riders are training for racing or short on time - they may not be intentionally trying to come off as douch*bags, they're just going hard and not wanting to chit chat at that moment. Give them a break...

    Bad attitudes in a shop is unnecessary. I stopped going to a local shop for a year until they changed staff. Now, they've really stepped it up in positivity and I give them nothing but props.

  8. #8
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    Most of the people I see and meet are very friendly. If I am ever stopped on a trail 9 out of 10 times they will ask if I am ok or need any help. Honestly I think the mountain bike world is alot friendlier than the bmx or road bike world by far. You have some dudes that take it way too serious but over all most people are pretty cool. Shops can be hit or miss. In our area half of the shops are cool and half are stuck up.

  9. #9
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    Don't wear your tube socks over your pant legs. Relax and give it some time.

  10. #10
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    I posted something similar to this when I started mtb riding again. I know what you are saying and I see it. Some of the attitudes seem to me..how do I try to accurately describe it...'deliberate indifference' seems to fit. Not all around of course but a sizable number. I see folks and give a nod, a 'hi', a 'how r u', a smile, etc but more than not I get what I perceive as a deliberate ignoring my existence response.

    I mean I've stopped and helped guys out when they have flats, that seems to have broken the ice with some. I've even had some refuse my help.."cos a buddy has gone to get his.."WHAT". and I've even gotten.."nah, it's okay I'm not parked too far". Almost a "I dont know you and dont want to, go away and dont bother me dude" manner. Listen, I'm no lonely teen looking to join your gang and be best buds.

    I have my repair kit handy because when I got a flat I seem to be summarily ignored by the biking community. I mean no-one offered to help but I suppose it's possible that none of them had a puncture kit.

    As time has gone on and I see some folks somewhat regularly on the trail we exchange a quick "hi" as we pass each other. Joggers, walkers and older couples seem to smile and say a "hi" that they actually mean.

    I may look like a poser with a legit bike..what the hey, maybe I am a poser. I dont subscribe to lycra...at all. I'm in a tshirt, cargo shorts, flat-pedals, backpack and skate style helmet and not exactly lean and limber or look like I actually race so maybe I'm not worth the bother.

    I have found MTBikers in the flesh to be the most discourteous folks when compared to all the other activities I have been involved in over the past years. Worse than the BMW Motorcycle touring elites who themselves best the Harley bar hopping crew and that is saying something!

    Strange that folk on the message boards seem to be a nice enough helpful bunch. Hard to square that circle. I mentioned this to my girl back when I observed this and she said..."well, you are ugly and look like a bum"..meh, I cant disagree.

    All the same I ride, nod and say "whassup" to folk and do my thing. Some say hi some dont...keep rollin..and bring your repair kit.

  11. #11
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    Return the indifference.

    Just pretend they did answer you and just keep right on having the conversation as if they did. Further, pretend not to notice they're no longer near you as you ride off, still carrying the conversation.

    One step further is to answer for them. Have both sides of the conversation, out loud, staring them right in the eyes while you do it.


    & I hate to even put this out there, but em, it is Vail... not necessarily known as the friendliest of mountain towns.
    Last edited by p.doering; 09-28-2010 at 11:03 AM. Reason: formatting gone crazy
    Ride on, Anthony.

  12. #12
    the test dummy
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    when ever i solo ride i end up with a big group..... maybe its just your area in my area every on is supper friendly
    Quote Originally Posted by craftworks750
    Riding a mtb is like a reset button, 10 mins in and there is nothing else in the world that matters.
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  13. #13
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    thank you for the responses. I am happy to hear there are real people out there who enjoy their sport and share their experiences.

    Yes, I believe it is the area. There are a lot of people who throw money around like it is going out of style.

    Cobi, I'll definately make if to Fruita or Junction. Hopefully before the snow flies.

    Pete, you're the type of person who gives the sport a bad name. I don't have any complexes. Just looking for understanding.

    Scott

  14. #14
    Still surfin in my 60's.
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    Isn't Vail the land of "snotty rich people from somewhere else"? Please,everyone, be like my wife and never take anything I say serious.
    So you think you can jump!

  15. #15
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    Whenever I see someone on the trail, I generally pass em a compliment as they pass me. I also generally ask when someone is stopped if they need help with their bike or if they are injured or what not. I also tend to ask if they have any tips and usually get pleasant responses. Though every once in a while I get a "go faster" or "grow some balls and do the drop"

  16. #16
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    From my experience, all the trails I have been on thus far in East Tennessee, other bikers have been nice for the most part. They will talk and not seem like they are blowing me off, even when I am on my Rockhopper. I had a couple help me with directions on a trail I was new to, and others wish me luck before I left the trailhead. So, for me, I have had good luck with fellow bikers.

    -Brett

  17. #17
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    I've only run into one mountain biker around here who seemed rude.

    It seems like every time I'm out on the trail I have a short, pleasant conversation with someone. I'm an introvert too so it's definitely not my charming personality.

    One step further is to answer for them. Have both sides of the conversation, out loud, staring them right in the eyes while you do it.
    I'm a fan of this. I've actually done that to people before, good times.

  18. #18
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    I disagree with you Pete, I think you're being rude. If you don't like what he has to say, or disagree with it, just say so and move on. There's no reason to be an a**hole.

  19. #19
    Life is Go0d!
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    Here is how to get even...jam a stick in their front spokes..while he is on the ground, step on his helmet and jerk the ipod buds out of his ears. Next, twist the cadence magnet out of position located on the left chainstay, and while you are there...loosen the magnet on the front spokes (if the stick missed it by chance) grab all the gel/goo packs and stomp them like ketchup packets. When you have successfully completed all the above, give the speech about sausagefests, and glycemic indexes. Walk away proclaiming only women should wear lycra...and have legs that smooth. Happy face.
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  20. #20
    No longer a hardtailkid.
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    Pete, you are the topic of this thread. Take note.
    Quote Originally Posted by anthonys
    Its still just the push of a button away...
    I am no longer a hardtailkid. 2012 Trek Remedy 9!

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by goatscantsayno
    Why?

    Is this really that hard to understand?:

    "I've ridden for a very long time. With folks on department store bikes through folks with mega dollar bling-bling bikes.

    Most folks have been really cool to ride with, regardless of what kind of bike they are riding."
    You are being really immature. I mean, really?! The OP was just expressing his opinion; not looking to start a pissing match. I can say with complete confidence that you would NOT be fun to ride with.

    Moral of the story: Act your age, not your shoe size.
    Quote Originally Posted by anthonys
    Its still just the push of a button away...
    I am no longer a hardtailkid. 2012 Trek Remedy 9!

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by goatscantsayno
    Dearest Tim,

    Which part of "discussion board" are you struggling with?

    You're also mistaken in assuming that I don't like what he has to say. I DO like it. It's very funny.

    If everyone "just moved on" when they disagreed with something that was posted, this would be a very, very stale place.

    Thankfully, people aren't as milquetoast as you suggest they should be and lively discussions/disagreements/debates still flourish here.

    Sincerely,

    Pete
    Not struggling at all with the discussion aspect. I did post that you should voice your opposition to his opinion. You've taken it further here. To start, your post format is very belittling and I'm certain you know that. On top of that you reverted to name calling.
    fragile whiners with inferiority complexes
    At this point I'm not sure who has the inferiority complex... The guy venting about rude people he's encountered, or the one putting him down on an internet forum.

    A little disclaimer for you now. I know you'll probably counter my post with something else extremely witty, but I wont respond to it. I hope you have a good week, cheer up.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by goatscantsayno
    More erroneous assumptions. The week is already off to a great start and I'm not down at all so there's no reason at all to "cheer up"!

    Good job on "just moving on," even though it's pretty damn boring, even cowardly.

    p.s. My hypocrisy meter just pegged out!

    Timmy :"On top of that you reverted to name calling."

    Timmy: "There's no reason to be an a**hole."
    Stop being a meany face poopy head, you son of a biscuit eating bulldog.
    Quote Originally Posted by anthonys
    Its still just the push of a button away...
    I am no longer a hardtailkid. 2012 Trek Remedy 9!

  24. #24
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    Ignore him it's easy to be a s**t talker on the internet on a forum. Most people like him don't dare say this type of stuff to people face to face.

  25. #25
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    I don't think kid is going to win this battle.

  26. #26
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    In my younger days I surfed and snowboarded all over the world. This is the same attitude I sometimes ran into in those circles - people with some sort of chip on their shoulder or something to proove. We used to guess it was because some people actually believe all the aggro ******** they see in the mags and videos and such. They are trying to act like they THINK they should act. And it gets worse (or at least more common) in high profile locations.

    The good news is that most folks mellow out and drop the facade once you get to know them, or once they get used to seeing you out on the trails.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prostreet513
    Ignore him it's easy to be a s**t talker on the internet on a forum. Most people like him don't dare say this type of stuff to people face to face.
    Yeah, its really not that hard to get along both on the trail and here - most mtbrs I've met over the last 20 years have been that laid-back. You have to work at ticking people off and seriously, who has that kind of time, anyway?

  28. #28
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    I recently vacationed in Vail and rented a bike to do a ride when I was there. I rented a bike from Vail Bike Tech in Lionshead Mall and had a very good experience. I spoke to someone at one of the other shops in the village (the name escapes me) and was treated very well by him, too.

    I told them I wanted to do a cross-country ride of about 1.5 hours and both recommended Son of Middle Creek. I ran into another rider on the climb up to the trail head and although she was much faster than me, she slowed down for a nice conversation and then dropped me like a hot rock after she was certain I could find the trail head.

    Long story not so short, I went away impressed with how friendly of a MTB community Vail has. Hang in there -- I know for a fact that there are good shops and nice riders in your town.

  29. #29
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    Give it some time scott. You might look into some clubs. Prolly a lot of folks around vail are renting bikes and don't live around there which could explain some of what you see. If you get down to alb pm me we have some good rides here.

  30. #30
    Rolling
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    This thread should be called.

    " have a complex but passion is what I want to call it...."
    Last edited by lidarman; 09-27-2010 at 07:45 PM.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by goatscantsayno
    Again kid, please answer the question:

    Why? How do you know that?
    Yeah how could he know that? I guess some people just don't listen no matter how many times you tell them how cool you are.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoisonDartFrog
    Yeah how could he know that? I guess some people just don't listen no matter how many times you tell them how cool you are.
    I have no idea if that was attacking me, or defending me.

    So, I will just say...it is pretty safe to assume that he wouldn't be too great of a riding partner. [Here comes the "you know what happens when you assume" lecture]
    Quote Originally Posted by anthonys
    Its still just the push of a button away...
    I am no longer a hardtailkid. 2012 Trek Remedy 9!

  33. #33
    It's about showing up.
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    Soaking up a working knowledge of mtb culture takes time

    It can be pretty random and full of holes, too. Us this site; it is about the best you will ever do but trying to figure everything at once is a lost cause. Be a bit more specific.

  34. #34
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    Dear Pete;

    You are like fly paper; that ingenious device that the flies are attracted to, and try to negotiate at their doom-- and they never realize it, even as they struggle in the goo.

    Bravo for your appearance and the laughs.

    -Rich.

  35. #35
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    I’ve only ever experienced the d¡ckheads with attitude on road bikes, and I used to ride roadbikes from 1988 until 2009. I haven’t noticed them on mountainbikes… yet. Trust me, there are plenty of them on roadbikes. Something about the stiff saddles applying an excess of testicular pressure must make them uptight and inadequate… or something. Glad I quit that gig.
    QUOTE from MTBR.COM: You have given Brewtality too much Reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later.

  36. #36
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    Speaking of intelligence, you may not have to deal with this because you're perfect, but sarcasm is not conveyed well over the internet unless it is EXTREMELY obvious. Holy crap. There are 21 members viewing this thread. (That's more than 20!!!!)
    Quote Originally Posted by anthonys
    Its still just the push of a button away...
    I am no longer a hardtailkid. 2012 Trek Remedy 9!

  37. #37
    Rolling
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    Quote Originally Posted by hardtailkid
    Speaking of intelligence, you may not have to deal with this because you're perfect, but sarcasm is not conveyed well over the internet unless it is EXTREMELY obvious. Holy crap. There are 21 members viewing this thread. (That's more than 20!!!!)
    Who should be responsible for that though? Should morons have a free lunch just because it's the "internet"?

  38. #38
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    Be the change you wish to see in the world...

    Being rude/short/etc to someone you perceive as a "nOob" or just "making conversation" is a good way to turn someone off to the sport forever.

    That person may one day become a member of IMBA, pick up a Pulaski for the first time, enter a race, etc.. They may one day become one of "the tribe" to use the words of Zap.

    It's like the butterfly effect. Be nice. It costs you nothing.

    I just mention this because I recently watched Paul McCartney spend about 40 minutes bullshitting around with lowly baggage handlers almost immediately after playing a sold out, two hour plus show. Class is remembered.
    "Gimme a pack of 'low birth weights.'"

  39. #39
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    Does anyone else think Pete lives under a bridge like the other trolls???
    ________________
    Peace on dirt,

  40. #40
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    Don't sweat it. Around here there's more visitors than locals, so riders & bike shops wait to recognize you before they invest too much in a "relationship".

    Eat a PB&J at the meadow mountain shack & chat with the passer-bys... not everyone is looking for a new riding partner, but you never know. Show up at a trail work day and you'll meet the riders who give the most back to the sport.

    Shop around for the shop with the best vibe & buy some tubes... and then come back a week later to buy some bike crap. Then come back later to trade notes & buy more bike crap. If you're lucky you'll get a pull of tequila.

  41. #41
    I'm just messing with you
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    If you want a friend, get a dog

    I'll help with repairs, give directions, and try to be nice, but I really don't have much to say and don't want to hang around and listen to others talk. I'm basically not a social person - I ride alone and I like it that way. It's just the way I am.
    Chasing bears through the woods drunk with a dull hatchet is strongly not advised

  42. #42
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    My opinion of the CO riding scene is that there are many many riders that aren't very open to people moving into their scene. However, a lot of my opinion is based on these forums. The CO forum is full of people with a "don't come here" attitude. And getting into the sport just now is pretty similar.

    My friend that moved there from the East felt a same feeling. I know PA/NJ/NYC and NH/ME has a much more pleasant attitude about mountain bikers. It is rare to not get a hello back, and i say hello to everyone, or at least not to riders with headphones on. Meeting randoms in the parking lot also goes over really smoothly and i have often just started riding with randoms from the lot.

    On the other hand there are bad bike shops everywhere. If you go to a shop that caters more to roadies you could easily leave feeling unwanted. I've even been into great shops that are just having off days. They are busy or you get stuck being helped by their one anti-social employee. My favorite is getting the employee that doesn't ride and just starts telling you stuff that is clearly wrong.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    Who should be responsible for that though? Should morons have a free lunch just because it's the "internet"?
    i feel we give morons the "free lunch" as soon as we acknowledge them. As to the original op,
    ride on & you're guaranteed to run into good folks simply because you're on a bicycle. fact.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker
    I’ve only ever experienced the d¡ckheads with attitude on road bikes, and I used to ride roadbikes from 1988 until 2009. I haven’t noticed them on mountainbikes… yet. Trust me, there are plenty of them on roadbikes. Something about the stiff saddles applying an excess of testicular pressure must make them uptight and inadequate… or something. Glad I quit that gig.
    I also see more of the "attitude" cyclists on the road than on the trails. If I ever come upon another rider while mountainbiking, unless they are a racer type doing their race-paced workout I get smiles, greetings, and comments. I have been offered help whenever I have gotten a mechanical, offered tubes when I have a flat.

    If I ride on the road, or the paved trails along the river (Sacramento area) I get the stone-faced look from the roadies. I might be dressed in full road kit on a road bike like them, but God forbid you even nod your head one tiny bit at these guys. It is almost like there is some sort of roadie rule against interpersonal interaction of any type. Like they will get their roadie card taken away by some sort of hidden UCI observer just for smiling at someone!

    Ever so often the roadies will lock eyes with me and I might see some sort of begrudging acknowledgement that because I too am riding a road bike I am considered worthy of breathing the same air. One thing that cracks me up is having this happen on my drop-bar equipped commuter mountain bike. The roadie will see the drop bars, assume it is a road bike, make the eye contact, make the acceptance acknowledgement, then get completely flustered when they realize the tires on what I am riding are not impossibly skinny little things and in fact possess a tread! The look of confusion they get is almost as good as the worry they seem to drop into when they realize they gave an eyeball acceptance to some guy riding a bastard bike.

  45. #45
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    wow, seems I missed a lot in this discussion. lots of deleted posts, it seems.

    At any rate...a lot of people aren't genuinely trying to be @$$holes. they're just out for a ride, and a lot of people push themselves too hard to say much of anything.

    When I'm riding and I encounter someone when I'm in that situation, they'll be lucky to get a nod from me because I'm redlining. Otherwise, I simply nod or say hello. The only people I ever expect to start a conversation with are the people I'm actually riding with. Most folks are on the trails to ride, not to ******** around for hours.

    If I'm trying to drum up club membership or let people know about organized group rides or something, I'll approach them in the parking lot and let them know.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHAZAM!
    Yesterday I was driving, and people wouldn't look me in the eye. They wouldn't wave, or even nod their heads at me.

    Don't they realize that I'm a fellow driver? Those jerks all have attitude problems.
    Gripping first post.

  47. #47
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    Captian Obvious just came by and told me to comment that: He's pretty sure it is obvious to the people on the forum when someone is really pushing themselves. And that a friendly gesture is not expected and understandable when someone is hammering. I'm sure that most people are expecting reasonable acknowledgments during appropriate times, and it is those times that are upsetting, from a community standpoint. I wouldn't even bother saying hello to anyone who is clearly looking very in a hurry or too busy anywhere/anytime.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by scmpeters
    So I ask, If you run into a rider on the trail or at the trailhead, what do you say? Do you invite them to ride with you?
    I might say "hello" but then I go about my business and let them go about theirs. I think it would be weird to invite every total stranger at the trailhead to come riding with me. That would be kind of psycho.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHAZAM!
    Exactly!

    I was pushing my shopping cart around Safeway last night and it was very upsetting when almost all of the other shoppers could not be bothered to give me a nod or wave hello.

    So many bad attitudes. Don't my fellow shopping cart pushers realize what they are doing to our community?

    Just because I had box wine and squirt cheese in my cart that is no excuse for that jerk snob with the Dom and brie to not acknowledge me!

    My local Walmart greeter ignores me.

  50. #50
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    I have enough riding buddies, I'd snub you. If you just got into the sport, most shops have a weekly ride you can join. You can also post up ride opps on your local forum. I've met several people through MTBR who are now good friends. Let's face it, riding in a large group sucks, not good for the trail, too many mechanicals, too many agendas. It's best to meet a couple like riders, and stick to solo and smaller group rides.
    beaver hunt

  51. #51
    DynoDon
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    I only have a bad attitude towards people that have dogs off leash, they have caused me many problems, and they interfere with my right to the trail, plus many have tried to bite me...I was asked yesterday by two guys with big loose dogs, "Is there anybody else coming behind you?" I answered, "Only the DNR !!"
    I alway try to say something nice, or trail info/condition behind me when I'm coming off the trail, Hikers are the only ones I see with attitudes, well excuse me!! LOL!! most are nice though..

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHAZAM!
    Exactly!

    I was pushing my shopping cart around Safeway last night and it was very upsetting when almost all of the other shoppers could not be bothered to give me a nod or wave hello.

    So many bad attitudes. Don't my fellow shopping cart pushers realize what they are doing to our community?

    Just because I had box wine and squirt cheese in my cart that is no excuse for that jerk snob with the Dom and brie to not acknowledge me!
    Your sarcasm isn't relative to the OP's point. Stop it.

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoisonDartFrog
    In my younger days I surfed and snowboarded all over the world. This is the same attitude I sometimes ran into in those circles - people with some sort of chip on their shoulder or something to proove. We used to guess it was because some people actually believe all the aggro ******** they see in the mags and videos and such. They are trying to act like they THINK they should act. And it gets worse (or at least more common) in high profile locations.

    The good news is that most folks mellow out and drop the facade once you get to know them, or once they get used to seeing you out on the trails.
    I've been wondering if there is a MTB equivalent of the surfer term "soul". Maybe snowboarders talk about this too, I don't know. As I understand it, a "soul surfer" is someone who rides for the love of the ride and the ocean. They aren't concerned with sponsorships and competitions. They aren't interested in being seen or seeming cool for being a surfer. They aren't out there to rip and shred, or brag and boast about the biggest waves. They just love being out on their board in the sea and catching waves.

    It doesn't really seem like MTB has an equivalent term, but maybe the "Passion" name is the closest thing. Something I notice in MTB'ing though, is that interactions between random riders are somewhat discouraged by the nature of the activity. Most of the time you see another rider coming up or down and they have to focus on that climb or descent. People talk all the time about how they will ask if someone stopped needs help, then keep going. Stopping is almost a sign of weakness. Stopped riders are seen as unfit since they need a break, or potentially broken down. Sometimes I do need a breather. Sometimes a member of your group does. Sometimes it seems nice to just stop and take it all in though, but that isn't always encouraged by the sport's culture.

    Not to say their isn't any sociability. There is, at the trailhead, meet ups, races, group ride, at the bar. But in some ways the sport on the trail isn't generally conducive to social graces. Going back to surfing, they have the line up in between sets, snowboarding has the lifts. But once we get going it is often a go-go-go and try not to stop for anything type of pursuit.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by scmpeters
    I've been away from biking for a while now. I had been running a lot in the past 6 years and have to look at biking again due to an injury. I have tried to ask questions at my local Colorado bike shop. I live in Vail and thought people would be open to talk about their sport. The people in the shop look at me like I am a freak. What's up with that? Maybe I'm asking off the wall questions a mtn biker would already know. I DON'T! I buy a bike with the hopes of riding with people of the same interests. So I ride alone. I see other riders on the trail and try to engage in friendly conversation...NOTHING! Not a, "great day isn't it." Sure I don't have the fancy equipment. I've got a bike, helmet, hydration pack, and a great attitude.

    So I ask, If you run into a rider on the trail or at the trailhead, what do you say? Do you invite them to ride with you? Do you all have this attitude if the other person doesn't have the fancy equipment, you don't say crap?

    Someone shed some light! I live in the middle of the mountains and thought this would be easy.

    Scott
    So you're getting all butt-hurt about others not validating you and your choice of recreation?

    It's just a bike, man. Go ride it.
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  55. #55
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    Dang, I agree with lidarman... goatscantsayno (aka "Pete") was the funniest part of this thread, and his posts got deleted. A most excellent troll.

    What a bunch of "sensitive" types we got here... LOL

    Just my .02 -- When I am out riding by myself I am out there to be by myself and enjoy some quiet time. So I might say "hi", but I'm not really looking for a conversation. And it freaks me out a little if I am alone and a guy I don't know approaches me in the parking lot.

    When I want company, I'm usually riding with friends. So again, I might say "hi" but I already have all the company I need.
    I drank the 29er koolaid- turns out it was POWERade

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by MtbRN
    . goatscantsayno (aka "Pete") ,,,,, and his posts got deleted. ..
    I think the policy is

    "delete pete"

    Regardless of the content.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Petese
    That goat guy was scary and made lots of peeps upset and complain to the mods. That's what happens when some dim bulbs get their idiocy thrown back at them. They get uncomfortable.

    On the other hand, SHAZAM! is someone I would like to shop, drive, or ride with.

    I like string cheese too.
    Dude,,,,You know the drill. They find "pete" anywhere in your name or IP...you are toast.

    NorCAL IP's are all suspects...kinda like Hispanics in Arizona.

    start using peat or something,

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Petese
    I have no idea what you are going on about.

    You are a strange person and obviously what is wrong with mountain biking attitudes.

    We need a strange ride sometime again mang. But I thought you liked tequila better than cheese.

  59. #59
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    Oh wow ... even tho Croatia (where I live) is basically a shithole, I am sometimes glad to live here.

    Anywhere outside the city all mountain bikers at least wave or nod to each other in passing and make eye contact. If you are on trail a bit further in the wilderness people always say "hey" or make some witty comment or something "nice muddy day, isn't it" or something. If you see someone standing with bike down people ALWAYS, and I mean ALWAYS ask "is something wrong, or you are just resting?". I have helped some people change a tire once, and had some excellent conversations during water breaks with total strangers.

    In shops as well. Unless they are flooded with customers and really have no time, each shop I was in guys there helped me out and talked. Since most shop people are bikers, we always discussed what trails are worth a visit, etc..

    This hostility and "alienization" some of you talk about ... never saw it.
    Daemon
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  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    I think the policy is
    "delete pete"
    Regardless of the content.
    Hope not. There's more than one Pete here.

    Ha... what am I sayin? There'll only ever be one Pete. The rest of us are a buncha mere peters...
    Ride on, Anthony.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by manabiker
    I only have a bad attitude towards people that have dogs off leash, they have caused me many problems, and they interfere with my right to the trail, plus many have tried to bite me...I was asked yesterday by two guys with big loose dogs, "Is there anybody else coming behind you?" I answered, "Only the DNR !!"
    I alway try to say something nice, or trail info/condition behind me when I'm coming off the trail, Hikers are the only ones I see with attitudes, well excuse me!! LOL!! most are nice though..
    I like to ride with my dogs of leash 30-50 lbs. I guess all dogs can bite. Mine just like to run behind me.Never have seen any aggression. Bikers that think they own the path may look funny but no big deal, move on. I go when I rarely see anybody else on trails. I would never take them when it may be busy. I say "hey" as I pass or get passed by bikers/hikers. Snobby ones in past have been road bikers on paved train track rails that think they can go 60mph and own it. 99% of time people go "left" when they are going to pass, and most time I stay on right with wife single file. Now and then you chat alittle and meander, guy blew by and told me to watch it, I said "ya you might get hurt" He gave me the evil eye ... then as we passed within a 20yards of him getting in his car he was still eyeballing me. LOL , man I wish the wife wasn't with me.

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