Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 49
  1. #1
    Scott in Tucson
    Reputation: Krein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,329

    The longest singletrack trip ever?

    Mountain bikers are newcomers to the long distance trail world. Bike technology has come a long way, and ultralight bikepacking gear has made camping and riding singletrack possible. Only in the last fifteen years have bikepackers started tackling difficult singletrack routes like the Colorado Trail and the Arizona Trail. But one trail remained relatively untouched by bikepackers, and it is the granddaddy of them all -- the Continental Divide Trail.

    There are three major long distance trails in the US -- the Appalachian Trail, the Pacific Crest Trail and the Continental Divide Trail. The first two are summarily closed to bikes. Only the CDT is (mostly) open. It is also considered the hardest and most wild of the three. Yet no one had attempted to to thru-ride the trail... until now.

    It's been a dream of mine to tackle the CDT for years. It was a daunting task, full unknowns and major map work. I figured I would need 4 or 5 months to complete its 3100 miles, due to the difficult terrain and hike-a-bike. It wasn't an endeavor I wanted to pursue alone. Enter Eszter Horanyi, an accomplished bikepacker and my girlfriend. She holds nearly every bikepacking record worth holding, and somehow I was able to convince her that spending a summer pushing our bikes along the divide was a good idea.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm1.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm1_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    So we leaned our bikes against the start obelisk at "Crazy Cook" on the Mexican border.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm2.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm2_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    At first there is a wonderful singletrack. It lasts about a mile.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm3.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm3_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    The route then deteriorates into a non-trail. Sometimes it follows washes.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm4.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm4_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    Other times you simply strike your way across the desert, cross-country. Eszter's bike is right on the "trail."

    We worried about whether our tires would hold air against the desert plants. We worried that we'd end up walking the majority of the first one hundred miles, where no trail has yet been built. But the thru-hikers in front of us had beat in a nice "trail" in some places. We made the crossing of this remote piece of Chihuahuan desert in just two days, and loved it.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm5.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm5_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    We were stoked to reach the first actual singletrack, near Silver City. We were even more stoked that it was *good* riding.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm6.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm6_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    We began catching thru-hikers on our way to Pie Town. It was amazing how quickly they accepted us into the trails community, despite not fully understanding what it is we were doing. Yes, we are actually riding the singletrack CDT -- not the dirt road Great Divide Mountain Bike Route.

    We made some great friends out there amongst the hikers.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm7.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm7_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    A big challenge for a CDT rider is avoiding Wilderness, but we found a few places where even non-Wilderness CDT is closed to bikes. In this case, instead of riding the CDT we'd hoped, we took a detour to explore the lava tubes of the El Malpais.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm8.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm8_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    We pushed our bikes to 11,000 foot Mt. Taylor, and were rewarded with endless descending and the most refreshing water source in all of New Mexico. With all the information available for CDT hikers, finding a water was rarely a problem, though we did sometimes carry multiple full bladders.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm9.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm9_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    Sometimes Wilderness detours aren't so bad. Our invented route in the San Pedro mountains led us to a semi-hidden and beautiful hot spring.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm14.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm14_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    Sometimes Wilderness detours are bad. We took a chance on a squiggly line on the map -- the Canones National Recreation Trail. We found it covered in trees. It took us 4 hours to cover 7 miles, almost entirely downhill.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm11.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm11_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    Luckily our next stop was a retreat called Ghost Ranch, nestled between red rock cliffs reminiscent of southern Utah. We needed the rest for the heinous hike-a-bike that waited behind the ranch. For the next week hikers would ask us, "how did you get out of Ghost Ranch?"

    "The same way you did -- on foot!"

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm10.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm10_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    Northern New Mexico was a magic mix of forgotten tracks and explosions of dandelions.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm12.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm12_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    Our camping gear was minimal -- no tent and just a small tarp that we only set up if it looked like rain. One pound sleeping bags barely kept us warm, but the upside was that they kept our bikes light for pushing!

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm13.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm13_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    If you haven't ridden the CDT outside of Chama, NM, you are missing out. It's prime backcountry singletrack that few travel, but is accessible enough for day rides.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm19.jpg">
    <img height=450 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm19_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    We began encountering deep snow in Colorado, which wasn't too much of a surprise. It was early June. The solutions hikers came up with ranged from walking lower roads, to "flip-flopping" up to Wyoming in order to return to Colorado later. We wanted to keep the trip continuous, and also had to detour for the massive San Juan Wilderness, anyway.

    So we dreamed up an off-road route from Pagosa Springs to one of our favorite towns, Durango, CO.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm15.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm15_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    We spent almost two weeks there, riding locally, working on our laptops, and waiting for snow to melt. Our route out of town was clear -- the Colorado Trail! The trail to Silverton is perhaps the quintessential Colorado bikepack.

    <center>
    <a href="https://zenondirt.files.wordpress.com/2014/06/20140628-153441.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="https://zenondirt.files.wordpress.com/2014/06/20140628-153441.jpg?w=820">
    </a>
    </center>

    After Silverton we rejoined the CDT for a segment called Cataract/Coneys. We found deep snow and even a few new snowflakes as we traveled through this otherworldly and very high landscape.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm17.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm17_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    Our favorite night of the trip was spent in this yurt, right at treeline. It was the perfect remote refuge from the brewing storms and ripping wind. The next morning dawned bright, and we took a gamble on another squiggly line that we had no beta on. The Camp Trail was our best option to resupply in Lake City, and it turned out to be perhaps the best descent of the entire trip -- techy roots and Star Wars gliding through the aspens.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm18.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm18_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    Traveling on the divide means camping on it, which usually leads to impressive views and perfect locations for sunset watching. We were privileged to witness a number of fiery ones.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm20.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm20_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    This was one of our highest nights, spent on the 'other' Monarch Crest trail. Few people ride this section because it's steep, rocky and barely rideable. Luckily the miles before this were on the real Monarch Crest trail, and they were pure bliss.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm21.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm21_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    Making our way through the Collegiate Range and central Colorado was a treat for us. The Colorado Trail is familiar ground, and we got to visit with many of our friends. Some even joined us on the trail for a day or two.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm22.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm22_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    While the CDT shares some length with the Colorado Trail, it's different enough that it felt like a CT+ route. We climbed a number of extra 12,000 foot passes and even spent some time just above 13,000. The climbing above treeline is always worth it, but it did start to wear on us.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm23.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm23_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    The daily threat of thunderstorms also started to weigh on us. A few nights we went scrambling for roofs to stay under rather than rough it out in the rain.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm24.jpg">
    <img height=450 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm24_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    This is not bike-friendly trail -- unloaded or loaded. But if you stick with it, the trail pops out of the trees, out of the mud and into an incredible alpine landscape.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm25.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm25_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    Meet the guardian of Parkview Mountain. We shared the summit with a group of thru-hikers from the UK. Other hikers we met had encountered the same goat at the summit -- with varying levels of 'shear' on his coat.

    There's no trail down Parkview -- we descended the ridge immediately behind the goat, but it's open tundra or rock and is almost entirely rideable!

    Even still, this was probably the hardest day of the trip. Despite a dawn-to-dusk effort, we failed to cover 20 miles. Piles of downed trees stalled our progress, storms pinned us in the trees and we had to use our feet for most of the climbs.

    <center>
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/tyell2.jpg">
    </center>

    The onslaught of hike-a-bikes, big mountains and daily storms eased up as we reached Wyoming. Through the Red Desert the divide actually splits, meaning that water that falls in the Great Basin reaches neither the Pacific or the Atlantic Ocean. It's one of the most desolate, and most beautiful, places you can imagine.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm27.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm27_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    Our bikes were finally starting to do more than weigh us down and get stuck on branches. We were riding, and passing thru-hikers left and right. What took hikers 4 or 5 days took us less than two. Only in a few places, where the 2-track became too sandy to ride, did we wonder if it was wise to be following the hiking route, not the wide dirt road route of the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm28.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm28_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    We fought our way through an incredibly difficult stretch of the CDT between the Wind Rivers and Yellowstone National Park. The trail was rarely signed, all but forgotten, and difficult to ride. The views of the Tetons and Pinnacles of Togwotee Pass made the effort seem worthwhile, but my favorite part was this encounter was with these horse riders. We found ourselves riding in line with them, chatting about long distance travel. They loved that we were riding the entire trail and told us that there's a trail where they live that we should come check out. That trail? The Appalachian Trail!

    <center>
    <img width=600 src=http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/tyell34.jpg>
    </center>

    We decided to brave the busy park roads, making our way through Yellowstone and staying closer to the divide and the CDT. It was a good break from singletrack, and the geysers and colored pools are well worth the visit, by car or bike. Some of the roads are reasonable enough, but others are downright dangerous and full of RVs. It's too bad that the Park Service is so behind the times when it comes to embracing bicycles and getting people out of their cars.

    That said, we did manage to find a couple dirt roads and even some boardwalk and brief singletrack that are open to bikes, and it was a much needed break from the stress of RV dodging. We sighed in relief when we safely arrived in West Yellowstone, set to rejoin the CDT. Riding through Yellowstone was probably the most dangerous part of the trip. I'll take my chances in the wilds any time.


    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm29.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm29_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    Our introduction to Montana was sublime. The trail scales over 10,000 feet, to the Lionshead, but it does so with well graded switchbacks and beautifully benched trail.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm33.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm33_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    We counted 49 switchbacks on the descent, and I was able to get my bike around all but one of them without unclipping. Beautiful.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm32.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm32_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    It wasn't long before Montana started to show its teeth. The route follows the divide and the border of ID/MT very closely. It's a mishmash of singletrack, forgotten roads, game trails, fence lines and open meadows. One thing is constant -- if it isn't going steeply up, it's going steeply down.

    It's known as the 'divide rollercoaster' by the hikers. The other constant is the presence of jaw-dropping views. You're up high, and usually higher than everything else around.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm34.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm34_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    We leap-frogged with these hikers for a few days of the rollercoaster. We had just scrambled (sans trail) to the top of the peak they are heading to, and were in the process of picking our way back down. The community that arises on the trail every year is an incredible thing, and one we were very lucky to be a part of.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm35.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm35_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    In the Big Hole Valley the cumulative effect of our months on the trail finally started to catch up with us. It was hard to muster the motivation to push our bikes up yet another unrideable hill. It was tiring to sleep on the ground with minimal gear. We were having to tie food at night and worry about bears, too. Plus, it wouldn't stop raining. We were blessed with good weather for New Mexico, Colorado and Wyoming. But in Montana, our luck ran out.

    Fortunately the trail was often indescribably beautiful. Much of this area is slated for cap "W" Wilderness designation, and it sure feels wild, remote and unlike most places mountain bikers are currently allowed. Hopefully these places remain open!

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm36.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm36_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    This was the moment that CDTbike was closest to being a failure. Eszter had reached her tolerance level. She had had enough. Enough bike pushing, enough eating crappy food, enough of being tired. It didn't seem worth it anymore, and I couldn't really blame her. The long term effect of fatigue on the trail had been deeper than we had expected.

    For some reason, we had data service here, and I was able to rally social media for encouragement. Within a few minutes dozens of friends had chimed in with words of encouragement and support. We got back on the trail and rallied over the pass just before the next thunderstorm attacked it.

    People are awesome.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm37.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm37_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    I'm so glad we continued on, because it meant we got to ride the brand spanking new CDT sections near Butte. These are built to high standard and meant we spent far more time riding our bikes than walking them.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm38.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm38_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    After Butte the trail regained its normal character, throwing all sorts of challenges at us, but we could sense the end. A huge collection of Wilderness and National Parks meant that we were done with the bike-legal CDT at the town of Lincoln. We weren't to Canada yet, but the end felt near.

    As we neared Lincoln, we dragged our bikes up the ill-visited Black Mountain, setting up camp on its flanks. A winter storm moved in overnight, and we had the pleasure of watching it develop and interact right on the divide. The wind tried to blow us to the Atlantic Ocean while the snowstorm was dumping towards the Pacific. Eventually the blizzard broke over the divide, and we hurried for the warmth of lower elevations and the comforts of town. We had finished the bike legal CDT, but a few hundred miles yet remained, and winter was bearing down us. We had to hurry.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm39.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm39_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    We took our longest stretch on the Great Divide Mountain Bike route, and luckily it is one of the best. When we tried to deviate from it to explore more singletrack we quickly found that our minds had quit when we exited the CDT. Hike-a-bike was intolerable. The views were not worth it. Canada was calling and winter was right on our doorstep.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm40.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm40_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    We pedaled through Glacier National Park and made it over Logan Pass before the cold front could hit. But the east side of the divide was socked in with a storm, and the storm dumped over a foot of snow. Even though we had mostly roads to go, we were unprepared to ride through such conditions and camp out in it. We waited for clear skies while watching bad movies in a little motel room in Babb, Montana.

    <center>
    <a href="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm41.jpg">
    <img width=600 src="http://www.topofusion.com/images/diary/cdtfm41_resize.jpg">
    </a>
    </center>

    The sun did rise, and begin to melt the early snowfall. We crossed into Canada and pedaled into majestic Waterton National Park. From the townsite of Waterton, we stashed our bikes and hiked the four miles, southbound, to the official terminus of the CDT. Four thru-hikers came up and we all celebrated our incredible journeys together. It had been four months to the day for us. We'd covered some 3700 miles and climbed nearly a half a million feet. We're still recovering from the journey, but feel incredibly lucky to have had the time, ability, opportunity and company to pull it off. It was a hell of way to spend a summer!

    For *much* more, head here:

    <a href=http://www.topofusion.com/diary/cdt-2014-diary/>http://www.topofusion.com/diary/cdt-2014-diary/</a>

    Full journal entries, photos, GPS data, statistics, et cetera...
    Author of TopoFusion GPS Software. MTB+backpacking = bikepacking.net. Ride Diary.

  2. #2
    North Van/Whistler
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,589
    Great. Nice perseverance and particularly like the hiker-biker interaction which seemed to be overwhelmingly positive. This deserves someplace where cool stories are appreciated. Not this a s s hole of the Internet where people debate wheelsizes like Passion. Consider a submission to even Pinkbike.
    Locals' Guide to North Shore Rides http://mtbtrails.ca/

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    456
    Wow!

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: FLN75S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    132
    Well done and thanks for sharing what an incredible trip.
    2014 Trek Slash 8
    2014 Trek Superfly FS 8
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7MEfLAZIWAU-My Trail Dog

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rafalmtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    20
    Great achievement and beautiful adventure! Congrats!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    208
    Outstanding synopsis of your trip. I really enjoyed following the day to day adventure in your diary of the trip as you progressed. This summer, I had the good fortune of doing day rides in the Big Hole on the CDT and adjacent trails for 17 days so can really appreciate your travels through that area. Great country there. Thanks again for sharing your adventure with us. It is really interesting and a great achievement. Love the photo's.

  7. #7
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    13,781
    So this is where you've been! Killer trip!

  8. #8
    EMBA Member
    Reputation: Ladmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,228
    Fantastic! Memories forever.

  9. #9
    western NC
    Reputation: HPIguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    444
    Incredible, just incredible.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: plantdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    644

    The longest singletrack trip ever?

    Looks like an incredible journey. Way to stick with it. Thanks for sharing.

  11. #11
    CDK
    CDK is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CDK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    412
    Amazing! You guys are inspirational at the very leased. Thank you for posting this

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    753
    Probably the single best post I have ever had the pleasure of reading on this site. This is real Passion. Thank you for taking my mind on your journey. I am inspired.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    104
    I've been thinking of riding the Continental Divide and was thinking the GDMBR might be too "civilized." Its cool to see that the CDT is a realistic option too!

  14. #14
    So Stoked!
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    8,527
    Incredible opportunity and experiences riding in diverse regions and landscapes! Loves the pics and write-up
    Thanks so much for sharing
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  15. #15
    Scott in Tucson
    Reputation: Krein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,329
    Quote Originally Posted by NickandBruce View Post
    I've been thinking of riding the Continental Divide and was thinking the GDMBR might be too "civilized." Its cool to see that the CDT is a realistic option too!
    Depending on what you're looking for the GDMBR can be pretty civilized. It's a great and beautiful route, but as many are quick to point out, it's not really mountain biking.

    I think a hybrid of the two routes might be a really good option. A mix between hard riding and nice cruising on roads is usually the most pleasurable, for us. I can help in designing such routes...
    Author of TopoFusion GPS Software. MTB+backpacking = bikepacking.net. Ride Diary.

  16. #16
    Scott in Tucson
    Reputation: Krein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,329
    Quote Originally Posted by sidehiller1 View Post
    Outstanding synopsis of your trip. I really enjoyed following the day to day adventure in your diary of the trip as you progressed. This summer, I had the good fortune of doing day rides in the Big Hole on the CDT and adjacent trails for 17 days so can really appreciate your travels through that area. Great country there. Thanks again for sharing your adventure with us. It is really interesting and a great achievement. Love the photo's.
    Thanks for the kind comments, all.

    Synopsis is the right word, glad you liked it. It was hard to distill 4 months of riding, and thousands of diary entries into one ~2000 word post!

    Thanks for following along, too.
    Author of TopoFusion GPS Software. MTB+backpacking = bikepacking.net. Ride Diary.

  17. #17
    Super Dad
    Reputation: obs08's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    489
    awesome story, congrats on an epic trip!
    2006 Monocog Flight 26
    2014 Giant Trance 27.5
    2014 Trek Crossrip

  18. #18
    Lord Thunderbottom
    Reputation: TitanofChaos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    742
    Thanks for the write up, awesome trip, congratulations!
    Today I will do what others won't, so tomorrow I can do what others can't

  19. #19
    Candlestick Maker
    Reputation: baker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,153
    Truly epic! Thanks for the great pics and words. I think I got something in my eye... ;-)
    baker

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Harryman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    194
    Excellent post and thanks for sharing the adventure!

    I've had the pleasure of riding with you before, although it was only @ .64% of this epic.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    2
    strong work

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Rev Bubba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,381
    A post like this leaves me speechless. Congratulations and thank you for taking us along.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: evdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    840
    Scott, you AND Eszter should be ashamed for this trip because you clearly ruined the feeling of solitude and remoteness for all those hikers, not to mention the anxiety you caused them knowing they could be run down by speeding mountain bikes at any moment.

    Or... maybe that only happens in California on the PCT

    (supposedly, according to the PCTA and hateful old hikers on the internet)



    Awesome job with the trip and all the writeups! A week long bike pack is a long one for me, I can't imagine months of it even with the breaks. Hopefully you can put together some mapping/GPS info on what you rode so that more people can follow. I think our best defense against losing access to trails such as this is to do exactly what you did, which is to get out and ride it so that the hikers can see we are after the same experience they are after. Thanks for the post and the blog writeups!

  24. #24
    djrez4
    Reputation: djrez4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    213
    Ramen, brother. Ramen. The FSM abides.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    190
    Speechless just speechless, that is so awesome........living the dream...
    Lefty For LIFE!!!!! To have lived without passion, adventure, and thrill, is to never lived at all!!!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. 6/21 longest day of the yr
    By man w/ one hand in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 07-01-2014, 10:40 AM
  2. Longest downhill
    By JoeP112 in forum Virginia, WV, Maryland, DC, Delaware
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 05-16-2014, 08:46 AM
  3. Does this seem like the longest winter ever?
    By jkad in forum Pennsylvania
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: 02-25-2013, 01:46 PM
  4. Route suggestions for Southeast Singletrack bikepacking 1st trip
    By sellemt in forum Bikepacking and Bike Expedition
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-17-2013, 01:56 PM
  5. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 12-31-2011, 05:29 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •