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  1. #301
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    It's raining again and instead of getting wet and muddy I am on the couch with a blanket to build mountain bikes in the sky. Found Passion.

    This thread. Posting to come back and read the whole thing eventually.

    Lots of hurt account here. Sympathy to all. Indomitable peeps too.

    Last year I hurt myself riding. I didn't die, but could have. Not spectacular like some of the stories here.

    Basically climbing single speed up something I should have walked up since I noted at the start of the section that I should walk but wanted to try anyway, after all - I can just keel over if can't make it - gave it my all and the rear wheel slipped out and started sliding backwards and then the front wheel goes off the edge while i try to fall on the uphill side, but somehow the bike jack knifes and pulls me down and over and my chest is dead center impaled on the handlebar end like I fell off a step ladder onto it.

    My heart stopped, the sternum broke and hit my heart with the handlebar end.

    I came to after an OBD and couldn't breathe at first. Gathered some pluck and rode 6 miles to a ranger station.

    It's just over a year ago now and I am good. Got a good scar and some wire in my chest.

    I returned to riding 2 months after the accident. I had the reconstruction surgery a month after the accident. I should have had it right away. The month with the sternum moving around un-fixed was pretty bad.

    The way I feel about it: Riding is what I do. If I can ride I will.

    We are like that here.





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  2. #302
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    I rode my gravel bike on a nice little twelve mile ride. I went around a lake on a gravel road, took the bike path to a two and a half mile stretch of road, then a single track through a park, then downhill to my house. I was in no hurry. When I got home, now that I am on a social media(strava), I found out that this section was timed, and basically I was the slowest person in the state(240 out of 241). I decided that I needed to remedy that situation. I took my road bike down to the bike trail, had nothing on me except my license and my cellphone, did not even carry any water. Normally I stop and catch my breath whenever I get winded. I shifted into high gear and stood up for most of the uphill(85ft elev)two and a half miles. I was out of breath in the first thirty seconds, but I kept going anyway. My ribs hurt when I was done, and I still had not fully recovered when I got back to my car. I moved into 9th position, and spent the rest of the day trying to figure out how to shave off three more seconds and beat the next three people who were tied right below my name.

    At one forty in the morning, I woke up my wife and told her I needed to go to the hospital. In the ER, my heart rate went down to 30bpm, I got hot and sweaty, and my legs started to spasm. They brought in the defibrillator. I became convinced that I was wasting their time, and that I had pulled muscles in my ribcage, and that was the source of my pain. This may be partially correct, the left side of my ribcage has a large bruise on it. I tried to explain this to all of them several times, even though they had all ready told me that I had a heart attack. One of the doctors said, “you don’t wake up at two in the morning and go to the hospital with muscle pain”. I think that if I thought that all of the pain I had in chest was my heart, I would not be able to handle it. The ultra sound of my heart was fine, the catscan looked alright, and the enzymes in my blood were only slightly elevated. About the time I thought they were going to send me home they walked over to me and told me they were going to run a scope up through my wrist to look at my heart, and with this procedure there was a risk of a stroke or death.
    They found three blocked arteries, and put in four stents. This could explain why I have been running out of breath everytime I ride a bike. There was basically no damage to my heart. They all concluded that someone was watching over me.
    How am I supposed to pick a line through this.

  3. #303
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    Edit not working, should say moved up 9 positions from the bottom LOL
    How am I supposed to pick a line through this.

  4. #304
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    Gee Bill, glad to hear you are ok. Any idea if the bike excursion helped reveal this or if it was just a coincidence? Are you going to need to be off the bike for awhile or good to go?
    "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." -Douglas Adams.

  5. #305
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Gee Bill, glad to hear you are ok. Any idea if the bike excursion helped reveal this or if it was just a coincidence? Are you going to need to be off the bike for awhile or good to go?
    Yup, pretty sure it revealed the problem-also was good I could get right to the hospital(15min). They said take it easy for a while, just to recover from the surgery.
    How am I supposed to pick a line through this.

  6. #306
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    On July 5th I nose cased a blind triple at 35mph at Trestle bike park. Landed on my head and shoulder. Didn't black out and initially thought I just bruised my shoulder and knocked the air out of myself. After trying to raise my arm I realized I broke my shoulder. Doctor initially thought I punctured a lung and broke a few ribs too. Turned out to be just the scapula, and luckily not near the joint. After seeing a handful of trauma ortho's they decided surgery wasn't necessary. I started passive PT last week and still have 100% ROM. Still in a sling 50% of the time but I can't raise my arm. Scapula should be healed by the end of August but I have to wait until 8/17 for an MRI to see if I tore anything. I landed on a tucked shoulder so I hope not. Really not looking forward to the 8 month recovery if I need surgery. If it's not torn I'll be riding in September. All the doctors I've spoke to can't believe I didn't break anything else including my neck. Brand new Fox Pro Carbon with MIPS did it's job.

    I've already ordered a new helmet, leatt 6.5 neck brace, and some light body armor.






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  7. #307
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    Quote Originally Posted by misterbill View Post
    I rode my gravel bike on a nice little twelve mile ride. I went around a lake on a gravel road, took the bike path to a two and a half mile stretch of road, then a single track through a park, then downhill to my house. I was in no hurry. When I got home, now that I am on a social media(strava), I found out that this section was timed, and basically I was the slowest person in the state(240 out of 241). I decided that I needed to remedy that situation. I took my road bike down to the bike trail, had nothing on me except my license and my cellphone, did not even carry any water. Normally I stop and catch my breath whenever I get winded. I shifted into high gear and stood up for most of the uphill(85ft elev)two and a half miles. I was out of breath in the first thirty seconds, but I kept going anyway. My ribs hurt when I was done, and I still had not fully recovered when I got back to my car. I moved into 9th position, and spent the rest of the day trying to figure out how to shave off three more seconds and beat the next three people who were tied right below my name.

    At one forty in the morning, I woke up my wife and told her I needed to go to the hospital. In the ER, my heart rate went down to 30bpm, I got hot and sweaty, and my legs started to spasm. They brought in the defibrillator. I became convinced that I was wasting their time, and that I had pulled muscles in my ribcage, and that was the source of my pain. This may be partially correct, the left side of my ribcage has a large bruise on it. I tried to explain this to all of them several times, even though they had all ready told me that I had a heart attack. One of the doctors said, “you don’t wake up at two in the morning and go to the hospital with muscle pain”. I think that if I thought that all of the pain I had in chest was my heart, I would not be able to handle it. The ultra sound of my heart was fine, the catscan looked alright, and the enzymes in my blood were only slightly elevated. About the time I thought they were going to send me home they walked over to me and told me they were going to run a scope up through my wrist to look at my heart, and with this procedure there was a risk of a stroke or death.
    They found three blocked arteries, and put in four stents. This could explain why I have been running out of breath everytime I ride a bike. There was basically no damage to my heart. They all concluded that someone was watching over me.
    You're lucky to be alive, seriously.

    One thing that I've learned is that if you're having shortness of breath while exercising, there's a reason for it. Like if you can't seem to catch your breath and you're in shape, and it's unusual, there is something seriously wrong. You're not just having a "bad workout", you're in danger of dying. Happened to me once - had a little trouble breathing, couldn't seem to shake it, thought it'd just kind of work itself out - boy was I wrong. Pulmonary embolism. That's one most don't walk away from. Heart is another. We are both lucky.

    If things seems strange, they are. Get yourself to a hospital.

  8. #308
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    Good Lord, everyone, these are some horrendous stories! Best wishes to all, and happy outcomes to all.

    "If things seems strange, they are. Get yourself to a hospital."

    This statement jogged my memory just now of 16 months ago when i was sitting at a picnic table in front of a ranger station unable to move because i was having a heart attack, but i didn't know what it was. What a strange experience. I might have detailed it on this thread already.

    I had fallen on my handlebar with my sternum, and broke it dead center and punched my heart with bar end on.

    There was 6 mile ride afterwards to the ranger station. I can still remember it like a video in my mind. Funny how I can remember that.

    Never thought of it that way:

    "If things seems strange, they are. Get yourself to a hospital."

    At the time I was thinking I'll shake it off. I just need time.

    It was a good thing I went to the ER.

    BTW, I healed up well, eventually.

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  9. #309
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    Geez... Some of stories are terrifying! Luckily, I've never had such dangerous situations happened with me. I think God watches over meh

  10. #310
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    Rode 65 miles this weekend! I'm back.
    Front Range, Colorado

  11. #311
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Guess I should have asked if anyone actually died yet.

    "I got better."
    Does a heart attack count? there is a 40-50% mortality attached to it. I had a STEMI 100% block while on a easy MTB maintenance ride in Golden Gate Park. No warning signs of any sort, I am skinny, fit, cholesterol slightly elevated, vegetarian + fish every 10 days, never smoked, 2-3 drink/week ... kind of boring really. I did have a bad windsurfing accident a month earlier, probably cracked two ribs, and I took a lot of ibuprofen, that has been linked to increased risk of heart attack.

    Anyway, after 3 days in the hospital and being told not to even wash dishes at home (it was Christmas), recovery was relatively quick, short walks, one two blocks, and than after a month I was back doing 30' rides in the same spot. After 3 months I was windsurfing.

    But mentally it was a major blow and it took a long time to recover. At some level I still have not. I think the heart attack changed my perspective on life. I am not completely sure if for the best: facing mortality is disconcerting, and I kind of miss the delusional sense of immortality I had before the event.

  12. #312
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davide View Post
    Does a heart attack count?

    But mentally it was a major blow and it took a long time to recover. At some level I still have not. I think the heart attack changed my perspective on life. I am not completely sure if for the best: facing mortality is disconcerting, and I kind of miss the delusional sense of immortality I had before the event.
    Sure, a heart attack counts.

    I find that these experiences definitely change your outlook on life permanently. In my case, I don't really consider it a bad thing. In many ways, I take fewer risks in my riding, sure. But in some parts of my life, I actually take more. My experience taught me that life is short, and in response I would much rather build experiences and memories than to live a boring and secure life.

    I have always wanted to live in an outdoor/mountain town, but didn't think it would ever really work out and have mostly been content with traveling. My wife and I had an opportunity and we took it this summer. We ended up in Asheville, NC. Lots of risk involved, but definitely part of building experiences and memories.

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  13. #313
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    Tried to ride the art smith trail in June, first attempt on day two of vacation, 6:20am start, 101f temps... made it 4 miles in before abandoning bc of heat...

    Second attempt two days later, 5:30 start, 100 ounces of water in pack, 4 frozen bottles of water extra... made it out to the road in 2 hours, used most of the water by then, turned around to head home and just limped the whole way, got bad cramps before final decent... had to stop and sit in only shady spot I could find for 25 minutes to "cool off" started going again, immediately had problems, but a hiker found me and gave me a bottle of water and scratched their hike to help me down, it was insane

  14. #314
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkavan01 View Post
    Tried to ride the art smith trail in June, first attempt on day two of vacation, 6:20am start, 101f temps... made it 4 miles in before abandoning bc of heat...

    Second attempt two days later, 5:30 start, 100 ounces of water in pack, 4 frozen bottles of water extra... made it out to the road in 2 hours, used most of the water by then, turned around to head home and just limped the whole way, got bad cramps before final decent... had to stop and sit in only shady spot I could find for 25 minutes to "cool off" started going again, immediately had problems, but a hiker found me and gave me a bottle of water and scratched their hike to help me down, it was insane
    I don't understand your last sentence. A hiker "Scratched their bike"?
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  15. #315
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    I don't understand your last sentence. A hiker "Scratched their bike"?
    "Scratched their hike" as in canceled the rest of heir hike to give me their water

  16. #316
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkavan01 View Post
    "Scratched their hike" as in canceled the rest of heir hike to give me their water
    Got it, duh sorry. Sounds like quite a scary adventure.
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  17. #317
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Got it, duh sorry. Sounds like quite a scary adventure.
    Wait a minute, you weren't joking?
    "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." -Douglas Adams.

  18. #318
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Wait a minute, you weren't joking?
    Sadly no.
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  19. #319
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    Seriously, it's all fun and games until the SHTF.

    I remember this one time way back when a large group of friends went up to ride down from Shut-eye Peak and then down 007 one day, and I was the group leader, and I volunteered to sweep the group. I would let them go and play catch up.

    At one regroup where the trail crosses the dirt road lower down, a couple of my buddies got into a what I thought was a mock pissing contest about who was the faster rider. So one of the two said something like, don't try to catch me, because if you do might die trying.

    I thought nothing of it. Just friendly sparring.

    Well this was at the top of 007, and back in the day when everyone was on a hardtail pretty much.

    I'll never forget coming up to the group, and seeing the 15 riders or so all looking wordlessly at me lining the trail as I rode up to the guy who chased the dude who laid down the challenge.

    He was lying in the trail on his back writhing in pain, his bike cartwheeled off out of sight somewhere.

    He broke his back. He couldn't do anything about it. Had to just lay there, writhe and moan.

    This was in the days before everyone had a cellphone.

    Anyway, the guy who got hurt, go better after a year, and rides expertly.

    The guy who challenged him died from alcohol abuse, my diagnosis, but really he had some demons in him, about a decade ago now.

    I love them both forever. Dead or alive.

    But that day, turned to ash in that moment. It had been sunny in all ways, and all I can remember is it clouded over and became cold. It was still a long way down. I had a good old Nokia phone in the truck at the highway. My wife and I rode down the trail with amazing precision and had to drive a few miles to get a signal and call for back up.

    Broken rider was taken out on a Stokes wheeled litter by our group taking turns down the bumpy trail, and later airlifted by helicopter from North Fork.

    Since then, I have tried not to ride with a serious contest attitude. Yeah, it scared me.

    But what I still take away, is how cold and indifferent the planet, the universe, or even the matrix really is. I think, in some way, before that event, I was mistakenly deluded about the stakes involved when playing on the ragged edge. I'll stop explicating on that part here.

    Confidence based upon practice and skill is a real belief system, but vulnerability is a fact. Both of these guys are skilled riders.

    I almost died rock climbing once.

    Last year I had a heart attack when I fell and broke my sternum.

    After these mild brushes with death, for as exampled everywhere, such as here on this thread, there are far worse things; it occurs to me how awesome life really is, and how precious the present of the moment is.

    And I think that is one of the good things a recreational brush with death does to a person - that it re-frames existence and provides a higher baseline to continue to live from.

    But sadly, as we see, weather, earthquakes, war, politics, poverty, and poor nutrition, are deadly. And it is to these causes of unnecessary and unjust death that my attention, post recreational near death experience, that causes even more pain to see, and makes me realize how precious the last mountain bike ride was.

    Once upon a time I will confess, I would see an obese diabetic and cruelly feel self-righteous about how good my health was because "I took care of myself", whereas this fat specimen had decided not to eat better and get more exercise.

    Thankfully, it's been a long long time since I felt that way. I feel ashamed.

    To those who say, "It's his own ****ing fault", I would reply, look at yourself in the mirror when you say that next time.






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