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Thread: Hucking RIP?

  1. #1
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    Hucking RIP?

    Judging from the responses to the non-huck DVD thread and some others on this site I get the impression that there's a growing contingency of folks who have had enough of the huck coverage in mags/vids and the space devoted to the bikes on the showroom floor, and the marketing that makes people think they need those bikes. I've also heard a pretty good amount of folks around my area who pick fun at some of the people riding 3" wide tires and +6" travel bikes on the local trails.

    What are your predictions? Will the sort experience a backlash, a big movement towards "back to our roots" of riding singletrack in a flowing style that demands *gasp* riding AROUND obstacles on light bikes? Obviously there are people who never strayed from this style but I'm talking more about the public image that's promoted through the marketing side. Will more and more people start getting bored with the so-called X-treme factor (ho hum another road gap)?

    No smart a** remarks from the ss crowd please.
    Last edited by dir-T; 05-13-2005 at 04:25 PM. Reason: I hate leaving typos - when I catch them

  2. #2
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    Riding around obstacles should never catch on.
    Last edited by singletrack; 05-13-2005 at 04:40 PM.

  3. #3
    KgB
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    Quote Originally Posted by singletrack
    Riding around obstacles will never catch on.
    you obviously haven't been on Mary's loop lately.
    Riding around obstacles is the next big thing.
    An eight feet wide jeep road and people are off trail riding.
    WTF
    I've been inside too long.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by KgB
    WTF
    Ok I changed it so it makes more sense.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by singletrack
    Riding around obstacles should never catch on.
    Preach it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by doub1etrack
    Preach it.
    Stop following me. Shouldn't you be working or something?

  7. #7
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    I'm so tired of hearing the word "extreme" I want to puke. A type of video not mentioned very often are Hans Rey's adventure videos that mix adventure riding with a little bit of trials. I really enjoy those. I agree... the hucking videos that assault the senses are outs... and will be soon taken over by the types of videos you see on here. Wouldn't that be nice???

  8. #8
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    no no no

    Quote Originally Posted by singletrack
    Riding around obstacles should never catch on.
    I don't mean riding OFF the trail to avoid them. I mean smoothly weaving through rocks, stumps, hopping logs etc that are IN the trail similar to how we had to before suspension forks rather than just riding a straight line bombing over everything in the trail.

    The essence of my question though was this - do you think there will be some sort of backlash/burnout towards the huckfest that's all over tv, video, and magazines with more people ignoring that trend in favor of less so-called extreme style of riding?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by dir-T
    I don't mean riding OFF the trail to avoid them.
    Gotcha.

  10. #10
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    Seems like things are moving a little that way but I don't think it will ever really die out. I terms of videos I got a little sick of watching the same things over and over. Don't get me wrong, all the drops and jumps are amazing, but I'd much rather see actual ride footage. I loved the direction The Collective went with everything and hope the vids contiue to push more towards single track and technical trails. I just get a little angry everytime I see the segments with big drops that are obvoiusly way off trail somewhere totally shreding up areas that are going to give the anti-MTB folks something to be mad about. Seems like outside the racing side of MTB, bikes themselves are going towards SS hardtails and FS lightweight 'all mountain' rides.
    Sipping the Knolly Whisquillappa

  11. #11
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    Actual bike riding is dead ... watching videos is the Wave of the Future. Stay at home and watch your vids/ read you mags. Less traffic on the trail is better. D.
    You be you. I'll be riding.

  12. #12
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    In a general sense, I don't think DH or, ahem, "Freeride" is ever going to replace traditional trail riding as the way most folks enjoy their bicycles.

    But as far a the media goes, big air will always make better footage. Or maybe easier footage. It's hard to fully capture an epic ride, except for yourself in those last moments before your weary body succombs to sleep.

    I'm gonna go huck the climbs and grind out the descents now.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harvo
    I'm so tired of hearing the word "extreme" I want to puke.
    Harvo,

    Sorry to answer this question since my nickname is "ebxtreme", but I swear that is a tongue-in-cheek title bestowed upon me by my friends a long, long ago!!

    Follow my logic for a second here....my logic is somewhat skewed based on where I live:
    I don't think there's necessarily going to be a backlash or that it has to be an either/or proposition - rather I think the makeup of the "extreme" or "FR" crowd is currently changing (at least in my area it is) and the idea of "FR" and "XC" will start to morph towards one another - especially as the bike technology continues to evolve. The vast majority of "FR's" in Washington and in BC are normal people in their 30's, 40's and 50's that have been mt. biking for a long, long time and most of these people still ride XC as often as they ride their big bikes.

    This is very true of my core group which has an age range of late 20's to early 50's. I'd say the bulk of our crew has been mt. biking for 15 years.....and over the past few years, most of the guys has switched their "do-all" rigs to a 30+ lb. dualie with ~ 5" of travel. Most of these bikes (e.g. 5 spot, Bear, RFX, Liquid, ID, Slayer, Heckler, etc.) built up right are more than capable on both XC and medium-duty FR trails. As a result of having a bike that pedals well and is FR capable, we often do XC rides that also entails stunts, steeps, ladders, drops, jumps, etc. These rides, btw, are in addition to our usual epic XC rides that are pure singletrack and take us into the middle of nowhere.

    A good example of what I'm talking about:
    There is a great location not far from us that we ride pretty often. The ride has ~1,800 feet of vert (70% fireroad climbing) and is laced with singletrack trails that have intermediate level stunts built into them. It's a climb up so the people that want to ride the trails have to be able to climb (or push, I suppose) their bikes to the top of the mountain. Rides like this is is where the new breed of 6 or 7" bikes (e.g. 6 pack, ASX, Coiler, etc.) that pedal well are changing how folks view what is rideable and the types of bikes they ride in general. You can see the trails I mentioned here: http://mbaction.com/detail.asp?id=1294

    My long rant ends with this. My skills had pretty much plateaued for a number of years as a rider and the past 3-4 years has been the most fun I've had on a bike, ever. By mixing in XC and FR and constantly challenging myself, it's allowed me to develop skills that have helped both areas of my riding. Plus, it keeps things fresh by riding different locations, styles and with different people. I look forward to the next ride more than ever these days.

    Chers,
    EB

    P.S. If folks haven't seen the Collective, there's a fantastic section of that video where Dave Watson and Andrew Shandro (established Freeriders) are riding sweet singletrack in the Chilcotin Mt's in BC. It's probably my favorite stretch of that video and there's a voice-over of one of them talking about how it's the essence of mt. biking..... Every time I see that part, it gets me so pumped to go out in the middle of nowhere and rip singletrack!!

  14. #14
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    Although they can be fun to watch for a short while, these videos don't represent me or what I like most about mountain biking. Also, I've looked at the covers of some of the bike mags with guys peeling off of walls wearing full face helmets and didn't even bother to flip the first page. I long for the days when I used to read more about the nuances of frame materials and subtle geometry changes. Today, it's all about how much travel a bike can boast and how huge suspension allows you to just plow through the trail "like you're sitting on your couch". Personally, I want to use my brain when I ride, I want to have a sense of the trail beneath me and I want a bike that I can flick around at will. I know that there's a market for those who want to look like they are in a Mountain Dew commercial but I'm certainly not in that demographic.
    Last edited by ChipAllen; 05-13-2005 at 07:15 PM.
    The more complicated it is, the more that can go wrong.

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    I think it will die down a bit but freeriding helped mountainbiking become popular again. Before freeriding took hold, mountainbiking was losing momentum and had grown stagnant. It helped draw people back into the sport. Yes, freeriding is over saturating the market and in time it will lose some steam.

    Like another rider posted, freeriding has helped mountainbiking morph into another type of riding completely. Call it what you want but I call it aggressive xc or Extreme all mountain. It is just fun to go on a trail that has some medium difficulty stunts or knarly terrain mixed with some xc goodness. Mixing it up keeps things fun.

    Yeah I know, aggressive riding is nothing new to those who have been riding for years but for people like myself who weigh 215lbs, I just cant go out on a xc bike and air it out and ride really aggressively for fear of breaking parts and frames. The new or not so new breed of bikes like the Heckler, 5-spot, Six Pack, Saber, etc lets me let loose without any fear of breaking anything. By letting loose I dont mean 50ft road gaps either.

    Last summer I took my 36lb+ Heckler on many epic rides and had a blast. I love the essence of mountainbiking just like any other ss or xc rider. I have thought of going back to a hard tail a few times and I have fun just bombing around the city and smooth local single track on my rigid commuter. Reality sets in and the full cush plushness helps with chronic knee and shoulder pain, where a hardtail has me aching by the end of a ride.

    Freeriding has both helped and hurt the sport of mountainbiking but I am personally happy to see how freeriding is evolving and how it has changed mountainbiking and hopefully the future changes will be positive.

  16. #16
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    Funny thing . . . .

    I think MOST people that that say that bikes with 3 inch wide tires and more than 6 inches of travel just plow down the trail . . . DON'T have a bike with 3 inch wide tires and . . . .(I would venture to say that most of those folks have never ridden a bike with 3 inch wide tires and more than 6 inches . . .)

    Just like when full suspension bikes were first hitting the scene, die-hard hardtail riders would say "I'll never ride one of them, they suck too much energy, etc. they are just bad" now they all ride around on epics and have been converted . . .

    Just like ALL those people that said disc brakes on a Mt. bike, "it's crazy I tell ya, never see me with them crazy things on my bike, I'm all about the lightest V-brakes" Now MOST bikes (even some of the lower-end models) come standard with disc brakes . . .

    as technology improves, so too does the bikes . . . lighter, more USABLE travel, better for that true "all mountain" experience.

    the media will always show and promote the more "X-treem" side of things while pushing the things most average Jane and Joe can do to the back burner. X-treem sells, slow borring rides do not.

    backlash? yea right, remember when all the skiers went and beat-up all the snowboarders for getting into the Olympics. . .

    "What" . . .you say ok, that's a bad example

    remember when all the horse and buggy dudes had that "street gang" fight against the internal combustion engine?

    Welcome to the future . . .embrace it . . . move forward with it . . .

    (just think about a world where nothing progress') not a pretty sight!

  17. #17
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    I don't think that there is anything at all wrong with the long travel bikes and I think that we are all benefitting from the trickle-down technology that comes from a wider market. Anything that brings new riders into the fold and away from the Playstation is a good thing. I do think, however, that the hucker, downhill and freeride segment is overrepresented in most of the mags and videos out there. Maybe I'm just getting older...
    The more complicated it is, the more that can go wrong.

  18. #18
    JmZ
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    Locally...

    It started with the dually, went to the singlespeeds, now to a few trials bikes, and finally... guys with Unicycles are appearing on the trail.

    JmZ


    Quote Originally Posted by dir-T
    Judging from the responses to the non-huck DVD thread and some others on this site I get the impression that there's a growing contingency of folks who have had enough of the huck coverage in mags/vids and the space devoted to the bikes on the showroom floor, and the marketing that makes people think they need those bikes. I've also heard a pretty good amount of folks around my area who pick fun at some of the people riding 3" wide tires and +6" travel bikes on the local trails.

    What are your predictions? Will the sort experience a backlash, a big movement towards "back to our roots" of riding singletrack in a flowing style that demands *gasp* riding AROUND obstacles on light bikes? Obviously there are people who never strayed from this style but I'm talking more about the public image that's promoted through the marketing side. Will more and more people start getting bored with the so-called X-treme factor (ho hum another road gap)?

    No smart a** remarks from the ss crowd please.
    JmZ

    From one flat land to another.

    Advocate as if your ride depends on it...

  19. #19
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    Suddenly Im not ashamed to admit that Im an XC kinda guy. Im even buying clipless this weekend.

  20. #20
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    I see more of a morphing going on. I live in BC...but I started riding in Eugene Oregon back in the day and I love the epic flowy singletrack, but it does not exist where I am. So I have adapted to the riding here, but would love to see a mix of nice flowy singletrack with some little jumps and skinnies thrown into the mix, would be a ton of fun I think.

    I was doing some spring cleaning yesterday and came across a box of old bike and mba mags...turns out I have issue 1/2/3 of bike...nice. But I also came across an article I pulled out of the sept issue of mbs that...to me captures the mood of mountain biking....no matter what size tires you have.

    Check it out...I retyped the whole thing...lol...
    http://www.pedalhounds.com/modules.p...ic&p=1225#1225

  21. #21
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    The whole freeride, extreme thing is one of the primary reasons the non-cycling public thinks we're all a bunch of eco-terrorists. they catch a few minutes of X-games or ESPN2 and see a jungle of wooden platforms nailed to trees and they assume that anyone with a bike on the roof of their car is doing the same thing.

    A majority of MTB riders are doing cross-country but you'd never know it by looking at the pages of the major magazines.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vecsus
    The whole freeride, extreme thing is one of the primary reasons the non-cycling public thinks we're all a bunch of eco-terrorists. they catch a few minutes of X-games or ESPN2 and see a jungle of wooden platforms nailed to trees and they assume that anyone with a bike on the roof of their car is doing the same thing.

    A majority of MTB riders are doing cross-country but you'd never know it by looking at the pages of the major magazines.
    Hear!! Hear!! this is the truth, to this day I still have bitter arguments with my father about my passion for mountin biking. He thinks I do the freeride/downhill/"ramps in trees" thing when I am out on the trail. I grew up hiking, XC skiing and very environtmentally aware because of both my parents and deep seated love for the great outdoors. I ride in the most sustainable manner I can since that's how I was brought up, but even my own father can't always see that

    Honestly I have showed some of my friends and co-workers videos of XC riders doing their thing, or trail rider "lites" as I like to call them and they are quite impressed that people are brave enough to do that. Maybe hucking will give a little ground to more realistic depictions of our sport again.

  23. #23
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    I am wondering?

    Is there a connection with this whole free ride thing and whats going on with Bootleg Canyon? Any of the bootleg DHers post here? or is it just us, a small group of all aorund mountain bikers with the passion to ride. see this thread.
    HERE!
    And this ONE HERE!
    the - E - dog

  24. #24
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    I do believe that some of the current issue's that are plaguing the world of mountain biking are related to how people view us and that has come from 30 second bits of video they see here and there. Not only is bootleg experiencing these issues...but in BC it is pretty bad as well. What is killing us here is insurance and some of the trials that are being made have stunts that are not only huge, but nails into live trees and some live trees have been cut down.

    But trails all over the place are being threatened because of the perceived risk of mountain biking and that is freaking out beurocrats and private land owners. There have been a number of life changing accidents up here with some of the riders suing….that has changed the landscape of mountain biking as we know it.

    I personally would like to see a shift to more of an “all mountain” style of riding. Maybe I am getting old, but my body is not doing well with the large stunts anymore. But the good thing is I notice a lot less “BIG” bikes up here anymore. Most are moving to the 5-6 inch travel bikes with a better pedaling platform and enjoying the ride up a bit more…so I think that the change is happening. I don’t think we will ever loose the huck aspect of the sport…but I think that most riders are realizing that you don’t have to hurl yourself off of ramps and cliffs to have fun…there is so much more to our sport than that.

  25. #25
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    I don't get it...

    I NEVER see folks out on the trail with the full face helmet, full body armor, and the big DH bike. Actually, I did see one suiting-up once, getting ready to head down a trail that I had just scouted and told him was way to muddy. Other than that, its all guys and gals on xc or what I would call "all around" bikes just riding the trails. Yet, the mtb industry would have you believe that we're all flying off cliffs and doing backflips through the trees. Why? Seems to me that you're pointing all of your marketing towards a very small contingent of potential consumers. My guess is that "hucking" wasn't ever going to take over the sport, it was just the latest trend and tied in nicely with all the other "x-treme" sports that are popular these days.

    By the way, I have no problem with freeriding, etc. I just wish the industry would realize that most of us or at least alot of us aren't doing that kind of riding....

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