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Thread: Hucking RIP?

  1. #1
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    Hucking RIP?

    Judging from the responses to the non-huck DVD thread and some others on this site I get the impression that there's a growing contingency of folks who have had enough of the huck coverage in mags/vids and the space devoted to the bikes on the showroom floor, and the marketing that makes people think they need those bikes. I've also heard a pretty good amount of folks around my area who pick fun at some of the people riding 3" wide tires and +6" travel bikes on the local trails.

    What are your predictions? Will the sort experience a backlash, a big movement towards "back to our roots" of riding singletrack in a flowing style that demands *gasp* riding AROUND obstacles on light bikes? Obviously there are people who never strayed from this style but I'm talking more about the public image that's promoted through the marketing side. Will more and more people start getting bored with the so-called X-treme factor (ho hum another road gap)?

    No smart a** remarks from the ss crowd please.
    Last edited by dir-T; 05-13-2005 at 03:25 PM. Reason: I hate leaving typos - when I catch them

  2. #2
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    Riding around obstacles should never catch on.
    Last edited by singletrack; 05-13-2005 at 03:40 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by singletrack
    Riding around obstacles will never catch on.
    you obviously haven't been on Mary's loop lately.
    Riding around obstacles is the next big thing.
    An eight feet wide jeep road and people are off trail riding.
    WTF
    I've been inside too long.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KgB
    WTF
    Ok I changed it so it makes more sense.

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    Quote Originally Posted by singletrack
    Riding around obstacles should never catch on.
    Preach it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by doub1etrack
    Preach it.
    Stop following me. Shouldn't you be working or something?

  7. #7
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    I'm so tired of hearing the word "extreme" I want to puke. A type of video not mentioned very often are Hans Rey's adventure videos that mix adventure riding with a little bit of trials. I really enjoy those. I agree... the hucking videos that assault the senses are outs... and will be soon taken over by the types of videos you see on here. Wouldn't that be nice???

  8. #8
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    no no no

    Quote Originally Posted by singletrack
    Riding around obstacles should never catch on.
    I don't mean riding OFF the trail to avoid them. I mean smoothly weaving through rocks, stumps, hopping logs etc that are IN the trail similar to how we had to before suspension forks rather than just riding a straight line bombing over everything in the trail.

    The essence of my question though was this - do you think there will be some sort of backlash/burnout towards the huckfest that's all over tv, video, and magazines with more people ignoring that trend in favor of less so-called extreme style of riding?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by dir-T
    I don't mean riding OFF the trail to avoid them.
    Gotcha.

  10. #10
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    Seems like things are moving a little that way but I don't think it will ever really die out. I terms of videos I got a little sick of watching the same things over and over. Don't get me wrong, all the drops and jumps are amazing, but I'd much rather see actual ride footage. I loved the direction The Collective went with everything and hope the vids contiue to push more towards single track and technical trails. I just get a little angry everytime I see the segments with big drops that are obvoiusly way off trail somewhere totally shreding up areas that are going to give the anti-MTB folks something to be mad about. Seems like outside the racing side of MTB, bikes themselves are going towards SS hardtails and FS lightweight 'all mountain' rides.
    Sipping the Knolly Whisquillappa

  11. #11
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    Actual bike riding is dead ... watching videos is the Wave of the Future. Stay at home and watch your vids/ read you mags. Less traffic on the trail is better. D.
    You be you. I'll be riding.

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    In a general sense, I don't think DH or, ahem, "Freeride" is ever going to replace traditional trail riding as the way most folks enjoy their bicycles.

    But as far a the media goes, big air will always make better footage. Or maybe easier footage. It's hard to fully capture an epic ride, except for yourself in those last moments before your weary body succombs to sleep.

    I'm gonna go huck the climbs and grind out the descents now.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harvo
    I'm so tired of hearing the word "extreme" I want to puke.
    Harvo,

    Sorry to answer this question since my nickname is "ebxtreme", but I swear that is a tongue-in-cheek title bestowed upon me by my friends a long, long ago!!

    Follow my logic for a second here....my logic is somewhat skewed based on where I live:
    I don't think there's necessarily going to be a backlash or that it has to be an either/or proposition - rather I think the makeup of the "extreme" or "FR" crowd is currently changing (at least in my area it is) and the idea of "FR" and "XC" will start to morph towards one another - especially as the bike technology continues to evolve. The vast majority of "FR's" in Washington and in BC are normal people in their 30's, 40's and 50's that have been mt. biking for a long, long time and most of these people still ride XC as often as they ride their big bikes.

    This is very true of my core group which has an age range of late 20's to early 50's. I'd say the bulk of our crew has been mt. biking for 15 years.....and over the past few years, most of the guys has switched their "do-all" rigs to a 30+ lb. dualie with ~ 5" of travel. Most of these bikes (e.g. 5 spot, Bear, RFX, Liquid, ID, Slayer, Heckler, etc.) built up right are more than capable on both XC and medium-duty FR trails. As a result of having a bike that pedals well and is FR capable, we often do XC rides that also entails stunts, steeps, ladders, drops, jumps, etc. These rides, btw, are in addition to our usual epic XC rides that are pure singletrack and take us into the middle of nowhere.

    A good example of what I'm talking about:
    There is a great location not far from us that we ride pretty often. The ride has ~1,800 feet of vert (70% fireroad climbing) and is laced with singletrack trails that have intermediate level stunts built into them. It's a climb up so the people that want to ride the trails have to be able to climb (or push, I suppose) their bikes to the top of the mountain. Rides like this is is where the new breed of 6 or 7" bikes (e.g. 6 pack, ASX, Coiler, etc.) that pedal well are changing how folks view what is rideable and the types of bikes they ride in general. You can see the trails I mentioned here: http://mbaction.com/detail.asp?id=1294

    My long rant ends with this. My skills had pretty much plateaued for a number of years as a rider and the past 3-4 years has been the most fun I've had on a bike, ever. By mixing in XC and FR and constantly challenging myself, it's allowed me to develop skills that have helped both areas of my riding. Plus, it keeps things fresh by riding different locations, styles and with different people. I look forward to the next ride more than ever these days.

    Chers,
    EB

    P.S. If folks haven't seen the Collective, there's a fantastic section of that video where Dave Watson and Andrew Shandro (established Freeriders) are riding sweet singletrack in the Chilcotin Mt's in BC. It's probably my favorite stretch of that video and there's a voice-over of one of them talking about how it's the essence of mt. biking..... Every time I see that part, it gets me so pumped to go out in the middle of nowhere and rip singletrack!!

  14. #14
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    Although they can be fun to watch for a short while, these videos don't represent me or what I like most about mountain biking. Also, I've looked at the covers of some of the bike mags with guys peeling off of walls wearing full face helmets and didn't even bother to flip the first page. I long for the days when I used to read more about the nuances of frame materials and subtle geometry changes. Today, it's all about how much travel a bike can boast and how huge suspension allows you to just plow through the trail "like you're sitting on your couch". Personally, I want to use my brain when I ride, I want to have a sense of the trail beneath me and I want a bike that I can flick around at will. I know that there's a market for those who want to look like they are in a Mountain Dew commercial but I'm certainly not in that demographic.
    Last edited by ChipAllen; 05-13-2005 at 06:15 PM.
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    I think it will die down a bit but freeriding helped mountainbiking become popular again. Before freeriding took hold, mountainbiking was losing momentum and had grown stagnant. It helped draw people back into the sport. Yes, freeriding is over saturating the market and in time it will lose some steam.

    Like another rider posted, freeriding has helped mountainbiking morph into another type of riding completely. Call it what you want but I call it aggressive xc or Extreme all mountain. It is just fun to go on a trail that has some medium difficulty stunts or knarly terrain mixed with some xc goodness. Mixing it up keeps things fun.

    Yeah I know, aggressive riding is nothing new to those who have been riding for years but for people like myself who weigh 215lbs, I just cant go out on a xc bike and air it out and ride really aggressively for fear of breaking parts and frames. The new or not so new breed of bikes like the Heckler, 5-spot, Six Pack, Saber, etc lets me let loose without any fear of breaking anything. By letting loose I dont mean 50ft road gaps either.

    Last summer I took my 36lb+ Heckler on many epic rides and had a blast. I love the essence of mountainbiking just like any other ss or xc rider. I have thought of going back to a hard tail a few times and I have fun just bombing around the city and smooth local single track on my rigid commuter. Reality sets in and the full cush plushness helps with chronic knee and shoulder pain, where a hardtail has me aching by the end of a ride.

    Freeriding has both helped and hurt the sport of mountainbiking but I am personally happy to see how freeriding is evolving and how it has changed mountainbiking and hopefully the future changes will be positive.

  16. #16
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    Funny thing . . . .

    I think MOST people that that say that bikes with 3 inch wide tires and more than 6 inches of travel just plow down the trail . . . DON'T have a bike with 3 inch wide tires and . . . .(I would venture to say that most of those folks have never ridden a bike with 3 inch wide tires and more than 6 inches . . .)

    Just like when full suspension bikes were first hitting the scene, die-hard hardtail riders would say "I'll never ride one of them, they suck too much energy, etc. they are just bad" now they all ride around on epics and have been converted . . .

    Just like ALL those people that said disc brakes on a Mt. bike, "it's crazy I tell ya, never see me with them crazy things on my bike, I'm all about the lightest V-brakes" Now MOST bikes (even some of the lower-end models) come standard with disc brakes . . .

    as technology improves, so too does the bikes . . . lighter, more USABLE travel, better for that true "all mountain" experience.

    the media will always show and promote the more "X-treem" side of things while pushing the things most average Jane and Joe can do to the back burner. X-treem sells, slow borring rides do not.

    backlash? yea right, remember when all the skiers went and beat-up all the snowboarders for getting into the Olympics. . .

    "What" . . .you say ok, that's a bad example

    remember when all the horse and buggy dudes had that "street gang" fight against the internal combustion engine?

    Welcome to the future . . .embrace it . . . move forward with it . . .

    (just think about a world where nothing progress') not a pretty sight!

  17. #17
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    I don't think that there is anything at all wrong with the long travel bikes and I think that we are all benefitting from the trickle-down technology that comes from a wider market. Anything that brings new riders into the fold and away from the Playstation is a good thing. I do think, however, that the hucker, downhill and freeride segment is overrepresented in most of the mags and videos out there. Maybe I'm just getting older...
    The more complicated it is, the more that can go wrong.

  18. #18
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    Locally...

    It started with the dually, went to the singlespeeds, now to a few trials bikes, and finally... guys with Unicycles are appearing on the trail.

    JmZ


    Quote Originally Posted by dir-T
    Judging from the responses to the non-huck DVD thread and some others on this site I get the impression that there's a growing contingency of folks who have had enough of the huck coverage in mags/vids and the space devoted to the bikes on the showroom floor, and the marketing that makes people think they need those bikes. I've also heard a pretty good amount of folks around my area who pick fun at some of the people riding 3" wide tires and +6" travel bikes on the local trails.

    What are your predictions? Will the sort experience a backlash, a big movement towards "back to our roots" of riding singletrack in a flowing style that demands *gasp* riding AROUND obstacles on light bikes? Obviously there are people who never strayed from this style but I'm talking more about the public image that's promoted through the marketing side. Will more and more people start getting bored with the so-called X-treme factor (ho hum another road gap)?

    No smart a** remarks from the ss crowd please.
    JmZ

    From one flat land to another.

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  19. #19
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    Suddenly Im not ashamed to admit that Im an XC kinda guy. Im even buying clipless this weekend.

  20. #20
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    I see more of a morphing going on. I live in BC...but I started riding in Eugene Oregon back in the day and I love the epic flowy singletrack, but it does not exist where I am. So I have adapted to the riding here, but would love to see a mix of nice flowy singletrack with some little jumps and skinnies thrown into the mix, would be a ton of fun I think.

    I was doing some spring cleaning yesterday and came across a box of old bike and mba mags...turns out I have issue 1/2/3 of bike...nice. But I also came across an article I pulled out of the sept issue of mbs that...to me captures the mood of mountain biking....no matter what size tires you have.

    Check it out...I retyped the whole thing...lol...
    http://www.pedalhounds.com/modules.p...ic&p=1225#1225

  21. #21
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    The whole freeride, extreme thing is one of the primary reasons the non-cycling public thinks we're all a bunch of eco-terrorists. they catch a few minutes of X-games or ESPN2 and see a jungle of wooden platforms nailed to trees and they assume that anyone with a bike on the roof of their car is doing the same thing.

    A majority of MTB riders are doing cross-country but you'd never know it by looking at the pages of the major magazines.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vecsus
    The whole freeride, extreme thing is one of the primary reasons the non-cycling public thinks we're all a bunch of eco-terrorists. they catch a few minutes of X-games or ESPN2 and see a jungle of wooden platforms nailed to trees and they assume that anyone with a bike on the roof of their car is doing the same thing.

    A majority of MTB riders are doing cross-country but you'd never know it by looking at the pages of the major magazines.
    Hear!! Hear!! this is the truth, to this day I still have bitter arguments with my father about my passion for mountin biking. He thinks I do the freeride/downhill/"ramps in trees" thing when I am out on the trail. I grew up hiking, XC skiing and very environtmentally aware because of both my parents and deep seated love for the great outdoors. I ride in the most sustainable manner I can since that's how I was brought up, but even my own father can't always see that

    Honestly I have showed some of my friends and co-workers videos of XC riders doing their thing, or trail rider "lites" as I like to call them and they are quite impressed that people are brave enough to do that. Maybe hucking will give a little ground to more realistic depictions of our sport again.

  23. #23
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    I am wondering?

    Is there a connection with this whole free ride thing and whats going on with Bootleg Canyon? Any of the bootleg DHers post here? or is it just us, a small group of all aorund mountain bikers with the passion to ride. see this thread.
    HERE!
    And this ONE HERE!
    the - E - dog

  24. #24
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    I do believe that some of the current issue's that are plaguing the world of mountain biking are related to how people view us and that has come from 30 second bits of video they see here and there. Not only is bootleg experiencing these issues...but in BC it is pretty bad as well. What is killing us here is insurance and some of the trials that are being made have stunts that are not only huge, but nails into live trees and some live trees have been cut down.

    But trails all over the place are being threatened because of the perceived risk of mountain biking and that is freaking out beurocrats and private land owners. There have been a number of life changing accidents up here with some of the riders suing….that has changed the landscape of mountain biking as we know it.

    I personally would like to see a shift to more of an “all mountain” style of riding. Maybe I am getting old, but my body is not doing well with the large stunts anymore. But the good thing is I notice a lot less “BIG” bikes up here anymore. Most are moving to the 5-6 inch travel bikes with a better pedaling platform and enjoying the ride up a bit more…so I think that the change is happening. I don’t think we will ever loose the huck aspect of the sport…but I think that most riders are realizing that you don’t have to hurl yourself off of ramps and cliffs to have fun…there is so much more to our sport than that.

  25. #25
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    I don't get it...

    I NEVER see folks out on the trail with the full face helmet, full body armor, and the big DH bike. Actually, I did see one suiting-up once, getting ready to head down a trail that I had just scouted and told him was way to muddy. Other than that, its all guys and gals on xc or what I would call "all around" bikes just riding the trails. Yet, the mtb industry would have you believe that we're all flying off cliffs and doing backflips through the trees. Why? Seems to me that you're pointing all of your marketing towards a very small contingent of potential consumers. My guess is that "hucking" wasn't ever going to take over the sport, it was just the latest trend and tied in nicely with all the other "x-treme" sports that are popular these days.

    By the way, I have no problem with freeriding, etc. I just wish the industry would realize that most of us or at least alot of us aren't doing that kind of riding....

  26. #26
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    all mountain is big lately. a little bit of air, long rides, technical trails.

    that's how i've always liked to ride though...

    I think it's all just diversifying.

    also everyone and their brother is buying a road bike now.

  27. #27
    Justin Vander Pol
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    Quote Originally Posted by notrelatedtoted
    . Other than that, its all guys and gals on xc or what I would call "all around" bikes just riding the trails. Yet, the mtb industry would have you believe that we're all flying off cliffs and doing backflips through the trees. Why?
    Depends what part of the continent you're from. Y'all would be surprised at the stuff "normal" riders are doing around here. It might not be "hucking", but there's a whole lot of trail riders wearing body armor, using flat pedals and lowering their seatposts around here. And I'm not just talking about 20-something guys who've had too much caffeine. Its gals, xc racer types, old dudes, kids - everyone. Its just about trying new things, riding a new style, and having as much fun as humanly possible on really technical terrain and newly built features. Come on out to the Northwest or lower mainland B.C. sometime, you'll be hooked. And no, you don't need to drop a 5' rock or ride a skinny that's 6' off the ground. Mostly just natural, really steep, really technical riding.

    One thing the mags have wrong is what freeride is all about. If you go up to Fromme or Seymour (the birthplace of freeriding), or a lot of the places here around Washington State, you'll find that the really great riding incorporates mostly natural stuff. But its some steep, nasty, rocky, rooty stuff. All of the crazy drops and skinnies are always optional, even on the "gnar-core extreme" stuff you see in pics and vids. Honestly, its just the evolution of what a lot of us have been doing for 15+ years, finding the most challenging riding we can.

    But hey, Holywood always gets it wrong, so I'm just flattered that mountain biking is seen as "cool" by the people who decide what's cool. It means more people on bikes and away from the television.

  28. #28
    Justin Vander Pol
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vecsus
    The whole freeride, extreme thing is one of the primary reasons the non-cycling public thinks we're all a bunch of eco-terrorists. they catch a few minutes of X-games or ESPN2 and see a jungle of wooden platforms nailed to trees and they assume that anyone with a bike on the roof of their car is doing the same thing.
    This is an education issue - and a really good reason to support your local mountain bike advocacy group and help spread the word. I'm a trailbuilder, and will build everything from beginner paths to expert-only freeride trails. No trailbuilder worth the dirt they're riding on ever cuts or nails into live trees - ever. Its usually overly eager young kids who don't know better.

    And did you all know that the ladder bridges and skinnies that evolved into freeride trails were originally built in the mountain of North Vancouver (the North Shore) to get over a wet area in the most environmentally sensitive way possible? True story!

  29. #29
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    I'm weird I guess

    I ride all the North shore on my XC bike (98 Rocky Blizzard).

    I do all the double black diamonds including all the ridedowns and skinnies. I keep the drops to 3ft, done trials style, not huck style.

    I was thinking to myself that it seems wierd to me that what I am doing is 'freeriding'. Isn't it just riding, or mountain biking? Admittedly I have a bit of a wierd style. Part of it is my trials background and part of it is that I'm too cheap to get a 'freeride' bike since the old one isn't holding me back.

    I personally think that mountain biking would have gotten old for me if the north shore style stuff hadn't been invented. Part of the reason mountain bikers don't just get road bikes is the challenge of the off road terrain (the other part is being in nature, which sure beats riding down a road). If you keep improving your skills over the years, eventually you'll have to up the ante to keep things interesting.
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  30. #30
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    [QUOTE=juice]Depends what part of the continent you're from. Y'all would be surprised at the stuff "normal" riders are doing around here. It might not be "hucking", but there's a whole lot of trail riders wearing body armor, using flat pedals and lowering their seatposts around here. And I'm not just talking about 20-something guys who've had too much caffeine. Its gals, xc racer types, old dudes, kids - everyone. Its just about trying new things, riding a new style, and having as much fun as humanly possible on really technical terrain and newly built features. QUOTE]

    Your description doesn't really seem to match what the industry is selling, in my opinion. All I know is that I don't really read the mountain bike mags because they don't really seem to cover the kind of riding I do. Maybe I'm just a dork who is not nearly cool as he thinks he is...

    Damn kids with their baggy pants and hats on backwards!!!

  31. #31
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    [QUOTE=Squirrel]I ride all the North shore on my XC bike (98 Rocky Blizzard).

    I do all the double black diamonds including all the ridedowns and skinnies. I keep the drops to 3ft, done trials style, not huck style.
    [QUOTE]

    I don't think that's weird at all. I see guys/.gals ride everything on the shore/whistler on hardtails all the time.. Actually, burly hardtails with big forks are becoming pretty common in BC. One of my more humbling moments was a few years ago coming down a trail called Boogie Man when a guy on a Kona Caldera with a 80mm RST fork cleaned a huge multi-pitch granite slab....as I was walking down it! Granted, it was my first time on BM and it was slicker than snot, but still, I was blown away! Freeriding is just a label....I've never said that I'm gonna go Freeriding, I say I'm going mt. biking regardless of what types of terrain or which bike I'm riding that day.

    The bikes with more squish simply allow more "fudge factor" and aid in learning how to ride that type of stuff without injuring yourself, imo. If you're doing drops trials style, the extra squish isn't really gonna help you out. If you're flying off of stuff though, it's a nice 'insurance package' to have and I don't feel nearly as beat up after a day of riding. I think of it as an accelerated learning curve. Then, when I hop on my XC bike, certain items like steeps, drops, etc. don't feel nearly as daunting since I know how to hit them correctly.

    Chers,
    EB

  32. #32
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    easy solution

    when you get a tad burned out bombing around on a 9" travel bike do what I did.... Get a hardtail singlespeed. That will put things into perspective. I go nearly as fast, but in the rough sections, my vision is scrambled. No, I don't go around obstacles, I just have to bunnyhop more. Then when I get back on the big bike, I find that I can go faster that before, and in more control....

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by juice
    I'm a trailbuilder, and will build everything from beginner paths to expert-only freeride trails. No trailbuilder worth the dirt they're riding on ever cuts or nails into live trees - ever. Its usually overly eager young kids who don't know better.

    And did you all know that the ladder bridges and skinnies that evolved into freeride trails were originally built in the mountain of North Vancouver (the North Shore) to get over a wet area in the most environmentally sensitive way possible? True story!
    I build trails too and the ONE thing that really gets my panties in a bunch is when I see people nailing stuff into nice trees or cutting "live" trees down on public land. Nailing stuff into trees is just downright lazy and disrespectful. I love to see people who put the time and energy into making stunts out of dead wood and dirt, it also looks better and is usually more safe (if made from dirt).

    You are 100% correct on the "ladders for bogs". It's the only way to make a trail through the nasty stuff we get here in the NW. People realized ladder bridges were fun to ride on and that you could ride them on wet days without the mess and trashing. I would much rather see a wooden elevated trail OVER the sensitive grounds. I mean, come on, are people in the NW not going to bike in the rain or what? Biking in the rain is mandatory here. The more we can do to savethe trails and make it more fun, the better.

    ------------------------

    On the note of "where the MTB trends are going". Like previously stated people are getting into the "All-Mountain" riding for one reason; to maximize the FUN factor.

    I don't want to carry three bikes with me to the trail, so I need one bike to do it all.

    A fun day for me is riding flat ground 3 miles TO the trail, then riding several thousand vert feet UP the trail, and then bombing DOWN the trail like a bat out of hell. Me, like many other people, are willing to take on a bit more weight and travel in order to jump everything in sight on the way down including stunts/drops. We don't like taking a huge FR bike to a select trail where you park at the top and ride stunts down, where's the adventure in that? We like exploring and venturing into cool areas with great views and wildlife, while still having fun with all the drops and jumps mother nature provides (MOAB, perfect example). I can't think of anything more gratifying than burning ass up a 3000 ft+ mountain top and enjoying the view. Then as icing on the cake you get to bomb back down the mountain with no worries of busting equipment on root/rock drops (things normal XC bikes can't take).

    Bike technology has got to the point where we can get both uphill ability AND DH durability in the same package. I love it.

    The term Freeride has been bastardized by the new biking crowd. In snowboarding Freeride means exactly that, "Free to ride anywhere on the mountain", on and off the trail. Building bike stunts isn't "Freeriding" it's stunt riding, simple as that. A TRUE freerider makes use of the natural terrain on and off the trail to their full fun advantage. That doesn't have to include HUGE drops, or even anything man made for that matter. Freeriding started out in North Shore by guys just wanting to have the freedome to explore all parts of the mountain, not just the trail.

    MTB of today has turned "Stunt and jump riding" into Freeriding, which it isn't. Very sad. The new AllMountain category is more in line with the original roots of Freeride.
    Last edited by Mud _ Butt; 05-17-2005 at 05:08 PM.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vecsus
    The whole freeride, extreme thing is one of the primary reasons the non-cycling public thinks we're all a bunch of eco-terrorists. they catch a few minutes of X-games or ESPN2 and see a jungle of wooden platforms nailed to trees and they assume that anyone with a bike on the roof of their car is doing the same thing.

    A majority of MTB riders are doing cross-country but you'd never know it by looking at the pages of the major magazines.
    This is nonsense. Granted, I don't have espn2, but I don't see any riding on tv. I'd be willing to bet that the vast majority of "other" people's interactions with mountain bikers is on the trails, where you don't have to have 7 inches of travel to be a d1ck. I see plenty of 'traditional' mtb types not yielding, etc.
    Most people I've witnessed watching freeride footage w/ bridges and stuff are blown away and stoked.
    I really identify with you...SO MUCH.

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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by shabadu
    Granted, I don't have espn2, but I don't see any riding on tv.
    Here in BC probably the most popular TV station broadcast "Drop In" on Sunday afternoons. It is also a national TV network so a lot of people got to see what riders can do.

    http://www.pinkbike.com/modules/news...leview&id=2342

  36. #36
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    I did a similar thing, but use a rigid HT for one of my alternate rides (don't think my knees would like a SS).
    No margin for error there!

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by shabadu
    This is nonsense. Granted, I don't have espn2, but I don't see any riding on tv. I'd be willing to bet that the vast majority of "other" people's interactions with mountain bikers is on the trails, where you don't have to have 7 inches of travel to be a d1ck. .
    How can you possibly negate my statement if you don't have access to the source which I reference? If you don't see riding on tv then how can you label my claim as nonsense. And "I'd be willing to bet.." is a piss-poor premise for a conclusion. How about skipping your next ride and opening a book on basic logic.

  38. #38
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    Depends where you live.

    Quote Originally Posted by shabadu
    This is nonsense. Granted, I don't have espn2, but I don't see any riding on tv. I'd be willing to bet that the vast majority of "other" people's interactions with mountain bikers is on the trails, where you don't have to have 7 inches of travel to be a d1ck. I see plenty of 'traditional' mtb types not yielding, etc.
    Most people I've witnessed watching freeride footage w/ bridges and stuff are blown away and stoked.
    Up in Canada, we have two mountainbiking shows that are aired weekly across the country. "Drop In" is a show dedicated to freeride, urban, and trials riding. Drop in has become very popular.

    Next there is a show called the Norco "Ride Guide" which covers all facets of mountain biking. The show includes coverage of xc, all mountain, freeride, dh, trials and basically anything to do with mountainbiking.

    Two programs that offer something for any type of rider.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by CraigH
    Here in BC probably the most popular TV station broadcast "Drop In" on Sunday afternoons.
    Craig, I hope you're not saying the Drop-In series is better than the Trailer Park Boys!?! There's no way that Joridie Lunn riding on Bowen Island can compete with Ricky, Julian and Bubbles kidnapping Alex Leifson of Rush!! Don't get me wrong, I love Drop In, but the episode about "remarketing bbq's" was simply genius....

    Sorry to derail the conversation, but this presented an opportunity for me to bring up the TP Boys since it's become a HUGE hit amongst my crew after our many trips to CA got us hooked on it!! For those not in the know, it's worth investigating as the first 4 seasons are availabe on DVD. http://www.trailerparkboys.com/

    Chers,
    EB

    Now, back to your regularly scheduled "Hucking RIP" conversation!

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vecsus
    How can you possibly negate my statement if you don't have access to the source which I reference? If you don't see riding on tv then how can you label my claim as nonsense. And "I'd be willing to bet.." is a piss-poor premise for a conclusion. How about skipping your next ride and opening a book on basic logic.
    How can you possibly make such a sweeping statement about bike footage on TV? I live in Salt Lake City, UT and about the only bike footage I ever see is tired old crash footage on some "When sports go wrong"-type show. Granted, I don't watch too much TV. I wish I could watch Drop In or any other cycling show. The programming in BC and the rest of Canada is obviously different from what we get...you should be stoked.
    Regarding your last comment...read a grammar book before you punctuate sucka!
    On top of that, its a horrible idea. I'd rather ride than study so I can logically satisfy a reactionary kook on the internet.

    And to to answer the first question...no I don't think hucking is dead. But there seems to be far more dirt jumping and street riding in vids these days anyhow. I think street and DJ are cheaper and easier to gather footage of. I am currently preferring DH racing footage anyhow, i.e. Sprung, Earthed, Synopsis.
    I watched Plush 1 last night. Now thats some funny stuff.
    Last edited by shabadu; 05-18-2005 at 02:31 PM.
    I really identify with you...SO MUCH.

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  41. #41
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    Actually, I don't think I've watched a whole episode of the TP boys.

    I also missed most of the Drop-In broadcasts too as I'm usually riding on Sundays.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by ebxtreme

    P.S. If folks haven't seen the Collective, there's a fantastic section of that video where Dave Watson and Andrew Shandro (established Freeriders) are riding sweet singletrack in the Chilcotin Mt's in BC. It's probably my favorite stretch of that video and there's a voice-over of one of them talking about how it's the essence of mt. biking..... Every time I see that part, it gets me so pumped to go out in the middle of nowhere and rip singletrack!!
    That's funny that you say that because it pissed me off to see shandro and watson skidding up chilcotin trails on big travel bikes. They got heli'ed into an area that's a 3 hour ride.

  43. #43
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    Yeah, Shandro and Watson totally destroyed those Chilcotin trails. Give me a break.
    Why turn this into a freerider vs xc war? They were on those trails for a mtb video and that is why they took a chopper to get there. They were riding fast on single track, not skidding sideways and nailing stunts into old growth forest.

    I agree with the other poster on this. That part of the collective is what mountainbiking is all about and not "skidding up the trails".
    Last edited by ronny; 05-18-2005 at 03:37 PM.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronny
    Yeah, Shandro and Watson totally destroyed those Chilcotin trails. Give me a break.
    and you've been there then I take it?

  45. #45
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    Two riders destroyed the trails making a video? I have better things to do than argue with a hater.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronny
    Two riders destroyed the trails making a video? I have better things to do than argue with a hater.
    ronny - you're an idiot. Ive ridden there, I know Sterling and I know how the scene was shot. That trail was narrow and it took over 20 takes to get the shot. Did I mention you're an idiot.

    btw I read your profile. You live in Calgary and ride a Joker. What kind of low-skilled fat ass needs a Joker in Calgary.

    Did I mention you're an idiot?

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by dir-T
    Judging from the responses to the non-huck DVD thread and some others on this site I get the impression that there's a growing contingency of folks who have had enough of the huck coverage in mags/vids and the space devoted to the bikes on the showroom floor, and the marketing that makes people think they need those bikes. I've also heard a pretty good amount of folks around my area who pick fun at some of the people riding 3" wide tires and +6" travel bikes on the local trails.
    Brilliant. Forty-eight responses to a "non-huck" thread and we've concluded that spells doom to the huck generation. Wow, talk about 'jumping' to conclusions.

    Kn.
    I used to be with it. Then, they changed what "it" is, and now what I'm with is no longer "it". And whatever "it" is, is strange and confusing.

  48. #48
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    Nice.

    Quote Originally Posted by LeeL
    ronny - you're an idiot. Ive ridden there, I know Sterling and I know how the scene was shot. That trail was narrow and it took over 20 takes to get the shot. Did I mention you're an idiot.

    btw I read your profile. You live in Calgary and ride a Joker. What kind of low-skilled fat ass needs a Joker in Calgary.

    Did I mention you're an idiot?
    Did I mention that you have absolutely no class? Resorting to name calling? Who is the idiot here? Judging people by the bikes they ride. Have you been to Calgary in the last 10 yrs? Calgary has a mountainbike park, lots of inner city single track and one of the largest skateparks in the world. If you knew anything about a Joker you would know it is not a bike for fat ass people either. The frame weighs under 8lbs and the bike can be built up for freeride or trailriding. Regardless, I dont even have the Joker anymore. Even if I did, the bike that I ride makes no difference here. You were right about something, I weigh a lot but I am not fat. 215bs lean brother. Which is why I choose to ride bikes like the Joker and Heckler. I am not a hardcore freerider either, I do a little of everything.

    What the fock do you know about Calgary? Absolutely Nothing. I can be riding in the mountains on anyone of hundreds of different trails in less than an hour. As a matter of fact, Moose Mountain is about 30minutes from my apartment and has a bunch of good freeride and xc trails. Moose Mountain has been on "Drop in" before. Heard of it?

    One of the highest rated trails in North America is just outside of Calgary. Jumping Pound Ridge and Cox Hill. Heard of it?

    Have you heard of Banff, Canmore, Kananaskis? All have good spots to ride and all are within an hour from Calgary. Where do you think Calgary is? Saskatchewan? WTF????

    Get some class.

  49. #49
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    At least I know of what I speak. You haven't even been to the Chilcotin have you? And if you did it sounds like you'd have a heart attack before you got there.

    Of course, unless you took a floatplane or heli in.

    The fact that you mention Moose Mountain as a good place to ride is laughable. Shuttled there lots lately on its nice 4 cross track?

    Another funny fact that you choose to ride a Joker or Heckler for Jumping Pound Ridge or Cox. Guess all that lard doesn't cushion one's ass sufficiently from all those nasty roots and corners.

    Of course I forget I'm speaking to a dork who thinks you need big bikes for xc trails and doesn't mind spouting off about areas they know nothing about.

    Quote Originally Posted by ronny
    Did I mention that you have absolutely no class? Resorting to name calling? Who is the idiot here? Judging people by the bikes they ride. Have you been to Calgary in the last 10 yrs? Calgary has a mountainbike park, lots of inner city single track and one of the largest skateparks in the world. If you knew anything about a Joker you would know it is not a bike for fat ass people either. The frame weighs under 8lbs and the bike can be built up for freeride or trailriding. Regardless, I dont even have the Joker anymore. Even if I did, the bike that I ride makes no difference here. You were right about something, I weigh a lot but I am not fat. 215bs lean brother. Which is why I choose to ride bikes like the Joker and Heckler. I am not a hardcore freerider either, I do a little of everything.

    What the fock do you know about Calgary? Absolutely Nothing. I can be riding in the mountains on anyone of hundreds of different trails in less than an hour. As a matter of fact, Moose Mountain is about 30minutes from my apartment and has a bunch of good freeride and xc trails. Moose Mountain has been on "Drop in" before. Heard of it?

    One of the highest rated trails in North America is just outside of Calgary. Jumping Pound Ridge and Cox Hill. Heard of it?

    Have you heard of Banff, Canmore, Kananaskis? All have good spots to ride and all are within an hour from Calgary. Where do you think Calgary is? Saskatchewan? WTF????

    Get some class.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeeL
    That's funny that you say that because it pissed me off to see shandro and watson skidding up chilcotin trails on big travel bikes. They got heli'ed into an area that's a 3 hour ride.
    Lee,

    My point was that it's a scene in a movie where it doesn't involve one single huck and, yet, miraculously - I somehow still enjoy watching it. I didn't say that the scene where Shandro is sliding his rear tire around the corner is the best for the trails though. FWIW, it doesn't seem like the Maui locals were too stoked that this film exposed many of their trails.

    Capturing the speed, exhilaration, scenery and fun-factor of riding singletrack is a hard thing to do, imo, and that's why the "hucks" probably get more footage in films. I have ridden with a helmet-cam on some bigger singletrack descents that we ride and at the end, I think "man, what an incredible ride!". Then, I usually pull the video onto my computer and think "wow, that looks totally uneventful" so I feel like the essence of singletrack isn't an easy thing to represent on video.

    BTW, I haven't been to up Gold Bridge before, but I'm heading there in early July and plan to ride out/back to Spruce Lake and will do another ride while up there (got a suggestion?). We also plan to floatplane into Warner Lake on our third day and ride back to Gold Bridge while we're there. Go ahead and let me have it! I know, I know.....we're lazy tourist, SOB's!

    Chers,
    EB

    P.S. Ken, that was a terrible pun!

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