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  1. #1
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    How the hell did you get into mountain biking?

    Hi, guys (Sorry for cross posting. Posted in General Forum as well.)


    I am working on a school project and I need your help.

    I need to know what made you to realize mountain biking is so awesome and made you purchase your first MTB.

    What was your motive?
    Did you have any cycling background prior to that?

    I need to know!
    Any comment would help.

    Thanks in advance!

    C
    Last edited by THE DESIGNER; 06-28-2013 at 04:24 PM.

  2. #2
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    because i hated running

  3. #3
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    I suck at endurance sports - therefore road biking. Love the technical workings of bikes and how they mesh w/ athletes. For bodybuilding I needed something to burn fat.
    Finesse is everything.

  4. #4
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    Around 1985-86 I saw some kind of tv show about these new fangled things called mountain bikes. It looked like fun so I saved up my money and bought a shiny chrome Ross at Lechmere for about $300. I was a freshman in high school. We don't have any mountains, but it was fun to ride on trails and I rode it all over town.

    My previous cycling experience was standard kid riding around town stuff.

    I didn't ride it much in college, but then I saw a picture of Bob Weir mountain biking and it motivated me to get out and explore some more and actually do more trail riding. Then a buddy of mine started to really get into it and I traded a quarter oz of mushrooms for a Trek singletrack 970 frame (made in America chromoly, it's sweet, still have it). The rest is history.
    NEMBA Freetown VP

  5. #5
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    How the hell did you get into mountain biking?

    I moved to Colorado and needed something to do in the summer.
    Soulforce Cycling | Riding apparel from size Small to 5XL. Visit us at - http://www.soulforcecycling.com

  6. #6
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    I was a pretty decent distance runner in high school.. I tore the IT band on my hip and for rehab I was told to ride a bike. My parents house backs up to what was fort ord so I got a mountain bike.. I liked it a whole lot better than cross country running and track..

  7. #7
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    I'm a connoisseur of fine adrenaline.

  8. #8
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    saw one in a bike shop way back in the day (late 80's) while shopping for a road bike... said hey that would be fun... been hooked ever since...
    broadcasting from
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    build trail!

  9. #9
    CrgCrkRyder
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    Used to hike a lot and jog a lot. Knees and ankles started bothering me, quit jogging and got fat. Bought a mountain bike and never looked back.

  10. #10
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    I just decided one day that mountain biking would be a fun way to exercise. At the time, I had no friends that did it.

  11. #11
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    Bought a copy of MBR back in 1995; shortly after got a Trek 810, one of my friends at the time was into biking as well so it worked out well.

    I lost interest a few years after that, then recently started working in a bike shop, got a new bike and don't think I will be looking back any time soon

  12. #12
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    Re: How the hell did you get into mountain biking?

    New Mexico kept shutting down the USFS land due to fire danger. As in closing it for all of Spring and Summer. This included the rivers, go figure. I was a pretty hardcore boater with no where to play and got tired of staring at my boats in the garage. So I sold them and bought a decent bike. I could ride state, private, BLM, and the reservation during the closures. I was shortly hooked there after. But once the NF and river opened again, I just didn't have time to boat as I could get a great ride in the same amount of time it took just to get on the water.
    He/she who works the trails does so in their own image.

    Speed just slows me down...

  13. #13
    squish, squish in da fish
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    In 96 I fell into a some cash from....we will say a business venture. I've always been into wake and snowboarding and wanted to try something new. Past by a LBS and ended up buying a barracuda. Rode it for several months then got in a nasty car crash. Been outta the loop until last summer and now have a '12 giant talon 1, '13 canfeild nimble 9, '12 trek cobia frame to be built for my daughter. I've got OCD so when I'm in I'm all in.

  14. #14
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    I've loved bikes since I was 5 years old and growing up in the country there really wasn't much else to do. BMX bikes were my transportation to freedom although they weren't that great for climbing hills of which they were many. Fast forward a few years and one day my brother showed up with a mountain bike. The brakes actually worked, those big tires would just roll right through the woods and the best part was there wasn't a hill around that couldn't be tamed. I've been hooked ever since. Sure there were a few years where I didn't have the time but it was never far from my thoughts and 25 years later it's as much fun now as it was then.

  15. #15
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    When I was a kid in the 60's in San Diego our house backed up to a canyon. We built a trail and raced around it with all the neighborhhod kids. There was also a steep area we dared each other to go down.

    Fast forward 20 years and I've been riding the roads for a while and I share a house in Santa Barbara with 3 mountain bikers. All the memories of kid play got me motivated to buy a mountain bike - a Trek 850 Antelope. So I spent my college years at UCSB exploring the trails in the area.

    Fast forward another 20 years and I live in Seattle and am hiking as much as I can and commuting to work on my road bike. Then, I hear about the Mountain Bike Alliance partnering with the local gov't to turn an unused open space into a dedicated mountain bike park and the park is going to be ONE MILE from my house. I went out shortly thereafter, bought a new bike, and started riding off road for the third time in my life. Lovin it as much as I ever did.

  16. #16
    I Tried Them ALL... Moderator
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    How I Got Hooked....

    I was a homeless, former meth addict who used crappy, disposable bikes to get around. I always admired "real" mountain bikes - but my then-current circle of "friends," would never allow ownership of one(they stole them all the time).

    In 2006, I was diagnosed with congestive heart failure(CHF) at age 42, after 22 years of non-stop tobacco, alcohol and being strung-out every day. As I lay in my hospital bed - I told myself, "If I even survive this (CHF)...I'm quitting EVERYTHING and taking-up Mountain Biking." Well, I survived and the first thing I did when I was released from rehab, was buy a new 2006 Trek 4900 Disc. Problem was, I could barely ride around the block twice, without gasping for air. I was out of shape, fat and had to hold my breath just to tie my own shoes! The road to recovery was a tough one. But, I held on tight and made tiny strides, every day. I rode the bike to my new job - after 15 years of being unemployed.

    Before I knew it - the 90 pounds of post-rehab weight gain was gone. It was time for a new bike. The 33-pound Trek hardtail was very instrumental in building my fitness up and got me to and from my "recovery job" of spinning Pizza every day. By then, I was riding almost level dirt paths and I was wanting something more up to the task of handling real-world trails. I befriended an XC racer who was hard-up for cash, and bought his 2005 Cannondale F2000SL race hardtail for $1300. The 18-pound Cannondale disc hardtail was really what got me "into" my bike. After being on a bike that was twice as heavy - the race HT was a welcome "reward" for my weight loss and newfound fitness. My first outing on the trail was a bloody mess; I crashed almost every quarter mile.....but I LOVED every minute of it. Obviously, the race bike I had was way too fast for my skillset. If it was not for this Cannondale - I would not become the hopeless weight weenie that I am today. Riding a light bike is almost like smoking crack.....once you try it - you'll settle for nothing less.

    One of my best friends owns a few bike shops - so I get to demo literally every brand of bike out on real trails, and not just a parking lot. Read my bike and component reviews. So, basically MTB replaced my destructive lifestyle, with a healthy one. For the first time in my life - I discovered I do have abs! Although I'll never race(my heart condition will not permit it) - I can always look and feel like one(my new "race" 29er below). I intend to ride MTB until I drop dead....

    Last edited by Cayenne_Pepa; 06-29-2013 at 10:06 AM.
    "The ONLY person who needs to race.....is the entrant"

  17. #17
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    BMXd as a kid in the 70/80s. Started weight lifting at 16 years old and hated doing cardio and legs. By 20 years old i was well on the way to a jail build (huge upper body with stick legs) and knew i had to come up with a way to work my legs/lungs/heart that i enjoyed. Decided to get a bike. I had planned on just getting a cruiser size BMX, but my step brother sold me on getting a MTB. 22 years later i have to go to the gym to keep my upper body matching my legs.

  18. #18
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    Great story!
    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    I was a homeless, former meth addict who used crappy, disposable bikes to get around. I always admired "real" mountain bikes - but my then-current circle of "friends," would never allow ownership of one(they stole them all the time).

    In 2006, I was diagnosed with congestive heart failure(CHF) at age 42, after 22 years of non-stop tobacco, alcohol and being strung-out every day. As I lay in my hospital bed - I told myself, "If I even survive this (CHF)...I'm quitting EVERYTHING and taking-up Mountain Biking." Well, I survived and the first thing I did when I was released from rehab, was buy a new 2006 Trek 4900 Disc. Problem was, I could barely ride around the block twice, without gasping for air. I was out of shape, fat and had to hold my breath just to tie my own shoes! The road to recovery was a tough one. But, I held on tight and made tiny strides, every day. I rode the bike to my new job - after 15 years of being unemployed.

    Before I knew it - the 90 pounds of post-rehab weight gain was gone. It was time for a new bike. The 33-pound Trek hardtail was very instrumental in building my fitness up and got me to and from my "recovery job" of spinning Pizza every day. By then, I was riding almost level dirt paths and I was wanting something more up to the task of handling real-world trails. I befriended an XC racer who was hard-up for cash, and bought his 2005 Cannondale F2000SL race hardtail for $1300. The 18-pound Cannondale disc hardtail was really what got me "into" my bike. After being on a bike that was twice as heavy - the race HT was a welcome "reward" for my weight loss and newfound fitness. My first outing on the trail was a bloody mess; I crashed almost every quarter mile.....but I LOVED every minute of it. Obviously, the race bike I had was way too fast for my skillset. If it was not for this Cannondale - I would not become the hopeless weight weenie that I am today. Riding a light bike is almost like smoking crack.....once you try it - you'll settle for nothing less.

    One of my best friends owns a few bike shops - so I get to demo literally every brand of bike out on real trails, and not just a parking lot. Read my bike and component reviews. So, basically MTB replaced my destructive lifestyle, with a healthy one. For the first time in my life - I discovered I do have abs! Although I'll never race(my heart condition will not permit it) - I can always look and feel like one(my new "race" 29er below). I intend to ride MTB until I drop dead....


  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    I was a homeless, former meth addict who used crappy, disposable bikes to get around. I always admired "real" mountain bikes - but my then-current circle of "friends," would never allow ownership of one(they stole them all the time).

    In 2006, I was diagnosed with congestive heart failure(CHF) at age 42, after 22 years of non-stop tobacco, alcohol and being strung-out every day. As I lay in my hospital bed - I told myself, "If I even survive this (CHF)...I'm quitting EVERYTHING and taking-up Mountain Biking." Well, I survived and the first thing I did when I was released from rehab, was buy a new 2006 Trek 4900 Disc. Problem was, I could barely ride around the block twice, without gasping for air. I was out of shape, fat and had to hold my breath just to tie my own shoes! The road to recovery was a tough one. But, I held on tight and made tiny strides, every day. I rode the bike to my new job - after 15 years of being unemployed.

    Before I knew it - the 90 pounds of post-rehab weight gain was gone. It was time for a new bike. The 33-pound Trek hardtail was very instrumental in building my fitness up and got me to and from my "recovery job" of spinning Pizza every day. By then, I was riding almost level dirt paths and I was wanting something more up to the task of handling real-world trails. I befriended an XC racer who was hard-up for cash, and bought his 2005 Cannondale F2000SL race hardtail for $1300. The 18-pound Cannondale disc hardtail was really what got me "into" my bike. After being on a bike that was twice as heavy - the race HT was a welcome "reward" for my weight loss and newfound fitness. My first outing on the trail was a bloody mess; I crashed almost every quarter mile.....but I LOVED every minute of it. Obviously, the race bike I had was way too fast for my skillset. If it was not for this Cannondale - I would not become the hopeless weight weenie that I am today. Riding a light bike is almost like smoking crack.....once you try it - you'll settle for nothing less.

    One of my best friends owns a few bike shops - so I get to demo literally every brand of bike out on real trails, and not just a parking lot. Read my bike and component reviews. So, basically MTB replaced my destructive lifestyle, with a healthy one. For the first time in my life - I discovered I do have abs! Although I'll never race(my heart condition will not permit it) - I can always look and feel like one(my new "race" 29er below). I intend to ride MTB until I drop dead....

    Beautiful story! Great to hear such a powerful turn-around! Keep it up and keep ridin'!
    "Let us not become weary in doing good, for at the proper time we will reap a harvest if we do not give up." Galatians 6:9

  20. #20
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    I bought my first mountain bike as a mean to get around campus at my college. Rode on a couple trails and was hooked. Now I have a road bike for my campus commute and ride trails at least 4-5 times a week. Getting out and riding a mountain bike on the trails is the best feeling I have ever felt. No better way just to get outside and forget about life for a while.

  21. #21
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    Prior experience with biking came as a kid on BMX bikes and later on an old free spirit road bike. I started mountain biking when one of my neighbors asked me to ride in he woods behind my house. At the time, I had a cheapie Nashbar AT1 MTB, The trails were mostly fire roads with areas that were cleared for future housing developments which were fun due to the hills and mud created by construction equipment.

    After two months of doing this every weekend, I was hooked. I ended up building a singlespeed hardtail mountain bike, bought a roof top bike rack and find myself driving up to an hour to hit good trails.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    I was a homeless, former meth addict who used crappy, disposable bikes to get around. I always admired "real" mountain bikes - but my then-current circle of "friends," would never allow ownership of one(they stole them all the time).

    In 2006, I was diagnosed with congestive heart failure(CHF) at age 42, after 22 years of non-stop tobacco, alcohol and being strung-out every day. As I lay in my hospital bed - I told myself, "If I even survive this (CHF)...I'm quitting EVERYTHING and taking-up Mountain Biking." Well, I survived and the first thing I did when I was released from rehab, was buy a new 2006 Trek 4900 Disc. Problem was, I could barely ride around the block twice, without gasping for air. I was out of shape, fat and had to hold my breath just to tie my own shoes! The road to recovery was a tough one. But, I held on tight and made tiny strides, every day. I rode the bike to my new job - after 15 years of being unemployed.

    Before I knew it - the 90 pounds of post-rehab weight gain was gone. It was time for a new bike. The 33-pound Trek hardtail was very instrumental in building my fitness up and got me to and from my "recovery job" of spinning Pizza every day. By then, I was riding almost level dirt paths and I was wanting something more up to the task of handling real-world trails. I befriended an XC racer who was hard-up for cash, and bought his 2005 Cannondale F2000SL race hardtail for $1300. The 18-pound Cannondale disc hardtail was really what got me "into" my bike. After being on a bike that was twice as heavy - the race HT was a welcome "reward" for my weight loss and newfound fitness. My first outing on the trail was a bloody mess; I crashed almost every quarter mile.....but I LOVED every minute of it. Obviously, the race bike I had was way too fast for my skillset. If it was not for this Cannondale - I would not become the hopeless weight weenie that I am today. Riding a light bike is almost like smoking crack.....once you try it - you'll settle for nothing less.

    One of my best friends owns a few bike shops - so I get to demo literally every brand of bike out on real trails, and not just a parking lot. Read my bike and component reviews. So, basically MTB replaced my destructive lifestyle, with a healthy one. For the first time in my life - I discovered I do have abs! Although I'll never race(my heart condition will not permit it) - I can always look and feel like one(my new "race" 29er below). I intend to ride MTB until I drop dead....


    Dude, that is awesome!

  23. #23
    Rogue Exterminator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    I was a homeless, former meth addict who used crappy, disposable bikes to get around. I always admired "real" mountain bikes - but my then-current circle of "friends," would never allow ownership of one(they stole them all the time).

    In 2006, I was diagnosed with congestive heart failure(CHF) at age 42, after 22 years of non-stop tobacco, alcohol and being strung-out every day. As I lay in my hospital bed - I told myself, "If I even survive this (CHF)...I'm quitting EVERYTHING and taking-up Mountain Biking." Well, I survived and the first thing I did when I was released from rehab, was buy a new 2006 Trek 4900 Disc. Problem was, I could barely ride around the block twice, without gasping for air. I was out of shape, fat and had to hold my breath just to tie my own shoes! The road to recovery was a tough one. But, I held on tight and made tiny strides, every day. I rode the bike to my new job - after 15 years of being unemployed.

    Before I knew it - the 90 pounds of post-rehab weight gain was gone. It was time for a new bike. The 33-pound Trek hardtail was very instrumental in building my fitness up and got me to and from my "recovery job" of spinning Pizza every day. By then, I was riding almost level dirt paths and I was wanting something more up to the task of handling real-world trails. I befriended an XC racer who was hard-up for cash, and bought his 2005 Cannondale F2000SL race hardtail for $1300. The 18-pound Cannondale disc hardtail was really what got me "into" my bike. After being on a bike that was twice as heavy - the race HT was a welcome "reward" for my weight loss and newfound fitness. My first outing on the trail was a bloody mess; I crashed almost every quarter mile.....but I LOVED every minute of it. Obviously, the race bike I had was way too fast for my skillset. If it was not for this Cannondale - I would not become the hopeless weight weenie that I am today. Riding a light bike is almost like smoking crack.....once you try it - you'll settle for nothing less.

    One of my best friends owns a few bike shops - so I get to demo literally every brand of bike out on real trails, and not just a parking lot. Read my bike and component reviews. So, basically MTB replaced my destructive lifestyle, with a healthy one. For the first time in my life - I discovered I do have abs! Although I'll never race(my heart condition will not permit it) - I can always look and feel like one(my new "race" 29er below). I intend to ride MTB until I drop dead....

    I just wanted to quote the story one more time because it is so cool.

    Seriously though congrats on your success.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  24. #24
    High Desert MTBer
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    From as early as I can remember, getting away somewhere on a bike was an adventure that thrilled me. 'Adventuring' was, and always has been, a great escape for me, and a great way to find calm. Every time I go out on my MTB now it is an adventure in some way, larger or smaller, but still an adventure.
    Put alongside the thrill and the challenge of exploring new trails, conquering trail sections, and constantly striving to improve, sometimes successfully, sometimes not, this pastime will always inspire me.
    Reading the meth guy's story is an inspiration too, I know that MTBing can pull people out of adversity because it has happened with me also. Not to that extent, but I know only too well how therapeutic it can be to get out on the trails. When life is tough, a good bike ride is a step in a healing direction.
    It's all Here. Now.

  25. #25
    9 lives
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockerc View Post
    Reading the meth guy's story is an inspiration too, I know that MTBing can pull people out of adversity because it has happened with me also. Not to that extent, but I know only too well how therapeutic it can be to get out on the trails. When life is tough, a good bike ride is a step in a healing direction.
    Can't agree with you more, rockerc!

    I was strictly a road cyclist until 2007 when I met a guy who introduced me to mtnb and then dh in 2009. It was a steep learning curve for this 40ish yr old female who only rode pavement. After 6 years, several bikes, broken bones, difficult cancer treatments, mishaps and adventures later, I married that Singlesprocket guy. We are still solidly together building trails, and shredding the gnar.

    We look forward to further adventures to Mont Ste Anne to the Okanagan and beyond!
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockerc View Post
    From as early as I can remember, getting away somewhere on a bike was an adventure that thrilled me. 'Adventuring' was, and always has been, a great escape for me, and a great way to find calm. Every time I go out on my MTB now it is an adventure in some way, larger or smaller, but still an adventure.
    Put alongside the thrill and the challenge of exploring new trails, conquering trail sections, and constantly striving to improve, sometimes successfully, sometimes not, this pastime will always inspire me.
    Reading the meth guy's story is an inspiration too, I know that MTBing can pull people out of adversity because it has happened with me also. Not to that extent, but I know only too well how therapeutic it can be to get out on the trails. When life is tough, a good bike ride is a step in a healing direction.
    ^ this
    From my early bmx days to today riding has always been a grounding energizing escape. For me it teaches confidence, determination as a path to success and of course the adrenaline endorphin piece as a bonus.

    Sent from my skz_tenderloin using Tapatalk HD

  27. #27
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    Back in the 70's, I used to spend hours and hours riding the walking trails in some timber by our house w/ my next door buddy. I don't remember the bike, but it was one my folks bought for me @ Western Auto. We preferred the woods to riding on streets any day. We then advanced to hauling camping gear with us in backpacks and spending the night. These are still 2 of my greatest passions: Mt. Biking and Camping! P.S. Age wise I am sneaking up on "fiddy" this year!

  28. #28
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    I had hiked this trail a week before and it was an overnight with a significant push to finish before dark the second day. I rented a bike and did the same trail combination in a little over five hours. Hooked! In the 25 years since I've seen more backcountry places than I ever could have on foot in a lifetime.

  29. #29
    CrgCrkRyder
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    I was a homeless, former meth addict who used crappy, disposable bikes to get around. I always admired "real" mountain bikes - but my then-current circle of "friends," would never allow ownership of one(they stole them all the time).

    In 2006, I was diagnosed with congestive heart failure(CHF) at age 42, after 22 years of non-stop tobacco, alcohol and being strung-out every day. As I lay in my hospital bed - I told myself, "If I even survive this (CHF)...I'm quitting EVERYTHING and taking-up Mountain Biking." Well, I survived and the first thing I did when I was released from rehab, was buy a new 2006 Trek 4900 Disc. Problem was, I could barely ride around the block twice, without gasping for air. I was out of shape, fat and had to hold my breath just to tie my own shoes! The road to recovery was a tough one. But, I held on tight and made tiny strides, every day. I rode the bike to my new job - after 15 years of being unemployed.

    Before I knew it - the 90 pounds of post-rehab weight gain was gone. It was time for a new bike. The 33-pound Trek hardtail was very instrumental in building my fitness up and got me to and from my "recovery job" of spinning Pizza every day. By then, I was riding almost level dirt paths and I was wanting something more up to the task of handling real-world trails. I befriended an XC racer who was hard-up for cash, and bought his 2005 Cannondale F2000SL race hardtail for $1300. The 18-pound Cannondale disc hardtail was really what got me "into" my bike. After being on a bike that was twice as heavy - the race HT was a welcome "reward" for my weight loss and newfound fitness. My first outing on the trail was a bloody mess; I crashed almost every quarter mile.....but I LOVED every minute of it. Obviously, the race bike I had was way too fast for my skillset. If it was not for this Cannondale - I would not become the hopeless weight weenie that I am today. Riding a light bike is almost like smoking crack.....once you try it - you'll settle for nothing less.

    One of my best friends owns a few bike shops - so I get to demo literally every brand of bike out on real trails, and not just a parking lot. Read my bike and component reviews. So, basically MTB replaced my destructive lifestyle, with a healthy one. For the first time in my life - I discovered I do have abs! Although I'll never race(my heart condition will not permit it) - I can always look and feel like one(my new "race" 29er below). I intend to ride MTB until I drop dead....

    Weight Weenie story of the year. An inspirational lifestyle turnaround - congratulations.

  30. #30
    The White Jeff W
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    I was an ice hockey junkie and was looking for a way to keep my cardio up over the summer. I hated running so I dragged my old Walmart bike out of the shed, cleaned it up & started riding around the neighborhood.

    At first I had to make myself go, especially on hot days. Then as my rides started getting longer I really started to enjoy them and look forward to them. It was very therapeutic, and I always felt great after a ride.

    One weekend I set out to do about a 20 mile rails to trails ride and on the way back I could feel my old bike coming apart under me. Time for an upgrade.

    I lived close to the C&O canal, a 185 mile dirt 'road' that follows the Potomac River from Washington DC to Cumberland MD, and figured it would be a great place for my training rides.Off to the local Trek/Gary Fisher store and $700 later I had my first mtb, a GF Marlin with a Rockshox Dart suspension fork & mech disc brakes.

    When I picked it up the salesman suggested that I take it to Greenbrier and drag the brakes down 'Big Red' to bed them in. I had no idea that there were mtb trails in the area so I got on the computer and started searching to see what else was around. Holy crap, there were tons of parks with single track open to bikes! That sounded way more fun than flat dirt roads.

    That Sunday I set off for Greenbrier to do some exploring. Turns out there was a race that weekend so I bailed out of there & went a little further down the road to Gambrill in Frederick MD. I rode the yellow blazed trail solo, a pretty technical & difficult 7 mile loop with lots of rocks. I fell, I crashed, I was beaten, battered & bloody but I had the time of my life! I was hooked. Soon I was ditching hockey to go riding.

    I moved away from that area a few years ago but last spring went back & rode that race at Greenbrier. I didnt finish very well but I finished and, as always, had a blast
    No moss...

  31. #31
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    Back in the '70s my roommate and I had fancy road bikes, but they weren't practical for errands, so we built up a couple of one-speed "klunkers" to use as town bikes. One day we took them on a trail and had a lot of fun. So we put together a couple for our friends and a bunch of us started klunking the trails. Then my buddy saw some guys who had put derailleurs on old Schwinns, so he put one on his. It was such an improvement that it inspired others to upgrade the bikes.

    Then one of us had the bright idea that we should have a downhill race on a steep dirt road. We figured out a timing system and had a race. Then a bunch of other guys heard about our race and wanted in, so I started putting on the races regularly.

    Problem was that I kept on shattering the old bikes I had modified, so eventually I asked a friend who could build bike frames to make me one for riding in the dirt. Some other people got in on the order, and eventually he made ten bikes. But my old roommate didn't get one of them, so he asked another guy to build him a frame. This frame builder decided to make a lot of this type of frame, but he found he couldn't sell them, so he called my buddy and asked if he would help. My buddy enlisted me in the effort, and we rented a garage to assemble bikes in. We decided to call our company "MountainBikes," but the guy we paid to trademark our name screwed up the application, so we didn't own the trademark on our name.

    After that a bunch of big manufacturers copied our design and made millions of bikes like the ones my buddy and I were building in the garage, and they called them all "mountain bikes." Riding off-road became very popular and a lot of people took it up.

  32. #32
    I'm just messing with you
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    Quote Originally Posted by THE DESIGNER View Post
    I need to know what made you to realize mountain biking is so awesome and made you purchase your first MTB.
    Remembering how much fun it was to tear the woods up on a spyder bike.
    Chasing bears through the woods drunk with a dull hatchet is strongly not advised

  33. #33
    ENDO!!!
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    Re: How the hell did you get into mountain biking?

    Quote Originally Posted by Repack Rider View Post
    Back in the '70s my roommate and I had fancy road bikes, but they weren't practical for errands, so we built up a couple of one-speed "klunkers" to use as town bikes. One day we took them on a trail and had a lot of fun. So we put together a couple for our friends and a bunch of us started klunking the trails. Then my buddy saw some guys who had put derailleurs on old Schwinns, so he put one on his. It was such an improvement that it inspired others to upgrade the bikes.

    Then one of us had the bright idea that we should have a downhill race on a steep dirt road. We figured out a timing system and had a race. Then a bunch of other guys heard about our race and wanted in, so I started putting on the races regularly.

    Problem was that I kept on shattering the old bikes I had modified, so eventually I asked a friend who could build bike frames to make me one for riding in the dirt. Some other people got in on the order, and eventually he made ten bikes. But my old roommate didn't get one of them, so he asked another guy to build him a frame. This frame builder decided to make a lot of this type of frame, but he found he couldn't sell them, so he called my buddy and asked if he would help. My buddy enlisted me in the effort, and we rented a garage to assemble bikes in. We decided to call our company "MountainBikes," but the guy we paid to trademark our name screwed up the application, so we didn't own the trademark on our name.

    After that a bunch of big manufacturers copied our design and made millions of bikes like the ones my buddy and I were building in the garage, and they called them all "mountain bikes." Riding off-road became very popular and a lot of people took it up.
    Awesome to have someone that was there at ground zero when MTB started, always think "that's Repack Rider " when I watch Klunkers"

    Sent from my ADR6300 using Tapatalk 2
    Just circles turning circles....

  34. #34
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    I remember my first mtn bike, a small wheeled specialized hard rock. I must have been 8 years old or so. Then came the next one with a rockshox indy xc suspension for and v brakes!! I took some time off riding from 16-24.

    Here's how I got back into it and what addicted me to the sport of dh. I went back to college and bought my first full suspension Scott nitrous 10. Rode it all summer, then ended up joining the school race team that fall.

    The first race had a decent size drop (this one below)



    I remember standing on top of it thinking, "No way I'm hitting that!!" It was one of the most intimidating things I'd ever encountered on a mountain bike. I stood back as some riders came up. I noticed they each took two pedal strokes into it, and it looked easy.

    Something in my mind shifted, maybe my competitive side coming out. I'd never "dropped" a cliff on a bike before, but if they could do it, so could I!!

    I pushed my bike up the hill to the spot where the other riders had started. Deep breath. Focus. Took my 2 pedals into it. Flew!! Then stomped the landing. It was one of the greatest feelings I had ever felt. I was addicted, and have been ever since.

  35. #35
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    I started out surfing as a lad 50 years ago. Back then, there was very little in the way of "localism" at the various surf breaks, with the exceptions of famous spots like Windansea. Surfing became my passion, bodysurfing at Boomers and Marine Street, Bellyboarding and kneeboarding at various beach breaks, and long boarding at Sunset Cliffs.

    I surfed to get back "in tune' with Nature and Mother Ocean, if you will, NOT to interact with other primates. My profession at the time was for the most part a martial arts instructor and security specialist/consultant. As the surf breaks got more crowded, (due to, IMO, the development of wet suits and board leashes, which enabled weaker swimmers and those too sensitive to the cold CA ocean temps to surf) altercations between surfers increased. Localism, etc. reared its' ugly little head. I was more than capable of fracturing it's little skull, too, and with little effort, but that was NOT why I was out there in the first place. So I found myself in an increasingly deep quandry: I would NOT tolerate disrespect to myself or my friends, but I did NOT want to be responsible for an entire spree of life-threatening injuries, which was exactly what was happening.

    I was more than happy to wait for my "turn" on a set wave, but that interval was getting longer and longer....the number of waves was basically the same, but the crowd at my surf breaks went from 8-10 to 25-50 on a good day. I wasn't getting much exercise . Surfing was becoming less and less of a physical challenge to me.

    Enter, about 1989, mountain bikes. I tried a ride on some local, shaded, flowy single track, and I was amazed at the dirt-similaries to ocean waves. Plus, I got good cardio while I did it, and I could ride for miles and miles back then with no human company intervening.

    I've been at it ever since. I guess I'm a Lifer.

  36. #36
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    I've been a athlete my whole life. Grew up playing soccer, baseball and football. Being inactive is something that does not sit well with me. As I got older I stuck with football and ended up playing in college. Now that I am much older I find mountain biking gives me that absolute exhaustion and adrenaline rush that I got when playing football. It also does wonders for the mind.

    BMX and freestyle was also a part of my life growing up. I probably watched RAD one too many times and we used to build race tracks out in the desert (I actually bought a P.K. Big Ripper not too long ago). I remember nerding out on bikes then, neon green over electric blue. What ACS rotor to get and what pedals had the best grip for my vans.

    Not much has changed.

  37. #37
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    Had a buddy store a bike in my garage in 1990 (Novarro <REI Brend>).

    Took a ride. As they say , the rest is history.

  38. #38
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    I was riding a Schwinn beach cruiser offroad in '82 at the age of 12, then singlespeeded a Schwinn Varsity with paperboy bars, Snakebelly tires, Oakly 3 grips and a two finger brake lever. Two years later my parents bought mountainbikes for their anniversary. A Schwinn Sierra and a GT Tequesta, both of which I rode into the ground. In '85 I found a near new '85 Schwinn High Sierra at a police auction for $40 and haven't looked back since.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  39. #39
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    Moved to Claremont CA because my wife was going to school in the area. Played a bunch of golf next to a mountain bike trail (Sierra La Verne Golf Club). Everytime I saw the mountain bikers I would get jealous of the cardio workout they were getting and the fun they were having. Eventually stopped golfing and got a $250 bike on craigslist and started doing local rides in the trails nearby.

    Then I took a 1 year respite when I moved to Pasadena. Discovered that there were some local trails (Brown Mountain) which were a lot more technical (El Prieto). My $250 craigslist bike didn't stand a chance and after a few bails and falls my derailleur snapped. Ended up walking my bike down the mountain and concentrate on marathon training and trailrunning.. A few months later, I decided with a buddy to get new bikes. I sprung for a $1800 specialized camber. My buddy likes to shuttle but I like the the challenge and suffering of uphills and climbs. Mountain biking is my primary form of exercise now and I love it!

  40. #40
    Hi There!
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    I've been trying to remember how i got into mountain biking since i saw this thread...and i just can't. i remember buying my first bike, a gt outpost sometime in the early '90's but for the life of me i can't even remember what prompted it.
    NTFTC

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    Because running is boring (and it wrecks my knees worse than biking). I find as I have gotten older (that statement is cringeworthy on its own) that I need more adrenaline rushes to make me feel alive. While pain is not something I have any desire to inflict upon myself, it makes you concentrate awfully hard on what you are doing...all that and I can afford a decent bike now...;-)

  42. #42
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    You guys are totally right - Golf is way too slow and boring; Running is monotonous and not fast enough; Gym is crowded and stinky of everyone's body odor......but only MTB can bring you one with nature, cool wind in your face and the best fat-burning cardio workout that will NEVER feel like a "workout." No two rides are ever the same!

    Keep 'em coming, guys....
    "The ONLY person who needs to race.....is the entrant"

  43. #43
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    I was always on a bike as a kid. When I was in second or third grade, my father bought my brother and I Honda trailbikes... a 50cc and a 70cc. We went to Maine and rode them on some trails and I absolutely loved that.
    Living on Long Island, there was no place to ride the Hondas. I was always jonesin' for bikes in woods. Shortly pre mountain bike, I bought a Fuji 12 speed road bike (1981 or so) and rode that thing everywhere. I was enjoying biking but wasn't fully sold on the road.
    I was always trying to cobble bikes combining BMX stuff and the biggest tires I could manage to fit into a road frame. One day, while in the bike shop, I noticed a poster on the wall of a guy on a Ross riding across rocks in a river. I thought that's exactly what I'm looking for. A while later, in the same shop, I purchased a rigid Schwinn chromo High Plains. Found some Long Island singletrack and immediately fell in love with trail riding.
    I can count the times on one hand I've rolled a tire on asphalt in 25 years since.
    I like turtles

  44. #44
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    Like others here I rode around on a BMX bike all the time in the Eighties. We would build little dirt jumps and trails everywhere. By the time I was a teen mountain biking started catching on and I ended up with one for my birthday and have been riding ever since.

  45. #45
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    Running in high school-->knees became unhappy-->road bike to do something else-->1991 DiamondBack Ascent EX graduation present-->WTF? I can't ride this thing on the road-->later, hippy MTB type sees me riding to class-->dude, bro, you got a MTB? wanna ride?-->my roady butt gets destroyed (but completely hooked) on some local trails-->no road bike for many years-->now have one road bike, four MTBs, and once in a great while still enjoy running.
    Florence Nightingale's Stormtrooper

  46. #46
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    Figured if I ever had to travel through miles and miles of single track faster than the general population, I could do so on a mountain bike

  47. #47
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    As a kid I rode my BMX bike in the woods because I did not enjoy being constantly buzzed by cars. As I got older I started going further into the backcountry which gave me the ability to see views/ rock formations etc. that many people will never see. Then for some crazy reason chasing girls became priority one. In 1988 I bought a Specialized Stumpjumper after a few years of not riding. Till that point nothing else had given me that happy to be alive/ care free/ everything is cool feeling that most of us seem to lose as we enter adulthood. I've felt this way since ride one. Riding also satiates the innate need that I have for daily "adventure", luckily I live in an area with tons of trails. No other sport gets you deep into the backcountry faster with minimal impact.

  48. #48
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    Moved to Utah to ski, needed something to do in the summer. I had grown up riding bikes everywhere (like most kids), playing around on my grandpa's original Diamondback RidgeRunner, and riding dirt bikes a lot, so it was a pretty natural thing to do, I suppose.

    All of my siblings ride, and my parents are getting into it as well, so it has developed into our family pasttime, if you will -- most of our family gatherings are planned around where we can ride.
    '11 Specialized Enduro Expert for the trails
    '13 Felt Z4 for the road

  49. #49
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    After talking to your "buddy" about this recently it's a pleasure to read what you just wrote. Thank you (both) for being the goofballs that you were then so I could be here today making a living selling and working on mt bikes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Repack Rider View Post
    Back in the '70s my roommate and I had fancy road bikes, but they weren't practical for errands, so we built up a couple of one-speed "klunkers" to use as town bikes. One day we took them on a trail and had a lot of fun. So we put together a couple for our friends and a bunch of us started klunking the trails. Then my buddy saw some guys who had put derailleurs on old Schwinns, so he put one on his. It was such an improvement that it inspired others to upgrade the bikes.

    Then one of us had the bright idea that we should have a downhill race on a steep dirt road. We figured out a timing system and had a race. Then a bunch of other guys heard about our race and wanted in, so I started putting on the races regularly.

    Problem was that I kept on shattering the old bikes I had modified, so eventually I asked a friend who could build bike frames to make me one for riding in the dirt. Some other people got in on the order, and eventually he made ten bikes. But my old roommate didn't get one of them, so he asked another guy to build him a frame. This frame builder decided to make a lot of this type of frame, but he found he couldn't sell them, so he called my buddy and asked if he would help. My buddy enlisted me in the effort, and we rented a garage to assemble bikes in. We decided to call our company "MountainBikes," but the guy we paid to trademark our name screwed up the application, so we didn't own the trademark on our name.

    After that a bunch of big manufacturers copied our design and made millions of bikes like the ones my buddy and I were building in the garage, and they called them all "mountain bikes." Riding off-road became very popular and a lot of people took it up.

  50. #50
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    I moved to Crested Butte.

    I had Huffy "mountain bikes" growing up as a way of getting around town, but my first singletrack experience was in CB and I've been hooked since. Terrible knees and I hate running, so biking is perfect. No desire to ever race or do it in a competitive manner...but love the trails and bike community here.

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