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  1. #51
    ~*~*~*~*~
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    Saved all the money I made selling my jewelry and handed the owner of lbs where I work a fist full of hundreds.





    .

  2. #52
    mtbr member
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    I paid for mine with U.S. dollar bills.

  3. #53
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    1. Sold some items that were not being used.
    2. Put the money in a demand note account.
    3. Applied for a Trek CC with no interest for 12 months. -- Took bike home.
    4. After 12 months pulled the money out and paid off CC with no interest.
    5. Kept the interest I earned in the bank.

  4. #54
    Mr. Chaos Theory
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    Good job!

    Turned my beefy unanticipated Tax Return into a loved and maintained used Pivot Mach 5.
    WeLcOmE tO tHe CoLlEcTiVe.

    2009 Pivot Mach 5
    2009 Trek 6K (commuter)
    Base of Operations NH USA

  5. #55
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    I saved up for months!

    Riding (a mountain bike) for me is both a recreational outdoors activity and a fitness routine — one that I used to do on a regular basis. So I really wanted to get back in shape. I made a new year's resolution from last summer. It's for my health. Nice equipment only helps.

    That's what we have to consider — the ultimate purpose of the bike.

    And having owned cheapees from the time I was a kid, and moving up in quality every decade or so, my previous bike had horrible rim brakes even though it was a $580 Rockhopper (in 1997).

    Now that I've sold the Rockhopper, I'm strategically saved up with enough cash to get a new one ('13 Trek Mamba). The determining factor for me now is HYDRAULIC DISC brakes.

  6. #56
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    bought my first 2 (old Specialized Rockhopper HT and 2002 Santa Cruz Superlight) with cash when I was single and had a good job.

    Moved, quit my job, went to grad school, got married, finmished grad school, got a new job. I negotiated a signing bonus with the new job and my wife said I could use it to buy a new bike. Bought a very lightly used, tricked out Santa Cruz BlurLTc. Now every time I go riding with someone new, my wife asks me 'do they have a nicer bike than you?" and most of the time, I get to smile and say 'nope'

  7. #57
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    I pay cash for everything but my house. The way I
    feel, if you don't have the money to buy it, than you
    don't need it.

  8. #58
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    I take that back, I paid for mine with a credit card but paid it off before the interest had kicked in.

  9. #59
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    The latest bike, a Tallboy LTc, I sold off a bunch of MX stuff and sports memorabilia to pay for the bike. My last bike, I paid for with a "0% for a year" credit card and paid it off before the year was up. That is my standard routine and how I buy most expensive stuff, even though I have the cash to buy them outright.

  10. #60
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    Cash. I had special ordered my '12 Jamis Dragon from the LBS after months of research, paid half down on ordering, and the other half two weeks later when it came in.

  11. #61
    Over the Hill
    Reputation: dstepper's Avatar
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    I put all my purchases on my Citi Bank cash dividend card or Discovery cash back card and pay it off end of every month. After about 3-4 years I will have 2k to 3k in those cash back accounts and buy a new frame. I have some really nice parts that can be handed down. I have bought my last two frames this way.

    Dean

  12. #62
    Flow like water
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    My first bike was a Falcon Black Diamond. I met a couple of guys who were starting a bike shop near my apartment. I talked my way into a part time job as a mechanic. They offered me one of the new bikes at a steep discount and let me pay for it in hours wrenching. That was good for me because I had absolutely no money for a bike.

    I don't remember the year exactly. It was in the 1970's. No one remembers those years very well.
    "Head injuries are pretty high-consequence" - AndrwSwitch

  13. #63
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    All my bikes were purchased piece by piece and assembled / build by me so I never really feel the financial impact. Also, I already have a bunch of parts laying around from previous bikes and builds so when I start a new project, I use the existing parts to start the build. Then as I buy the parts I want (as opposed to the parts I have), I put them on. The parts I remove either to go upgrade an already existing bike I have or they're sold off to fund the next thing.

    Case in point, the bike I just built -


    This bike start out it's life in my household as a fully rigid singlespeed until I had all the parts I wanted for it (which is now how you see it). The parts I took off of it are going on my next build when it arrives (come on On One, HURRY UP!).

  14. #64
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    By trading it for cash.

  15. #65
    El Gorrrriiii
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    Quote Originally Posted by kjlued View Post
    For years I have followed a couple rules to buying.

    1) If it is a toy, you pay cash.
    I have paid cash for every motor bike and bicycle I have ever owned.
    Sure, the bike is an investment in your health, but a high dollar one is not a necessity.
    So, if you can't afford a $3k bike with cash, then get a cheaper bike.
    Plenty of good choices for $500 or less and if you can't save $500 then you shouldn't have a credit card.

    2) Try and pay cash for anything that depreciates in value.
    i.e. I pay cash for cars. I have done so for about 6 years.
    I used to finance and just got to the point where I realized that is stupid.
    Of course, I settle for what I need and not what I want when it comes to a car but I certainly like not having a car payment over my head and the freedom not owing on a car provides me.
    However, if your wants take over, at minimum you never finance the taxes and dealer fees, and you should even pay down the depreciated value of the vehicle before signing on the loan.


    Financing a bicycle is just foolish IMO.

    BTW, I do not make a lot of money, I just budget myself.

    Very good philosophy. I don't like to buy with credit unless I have to or I get a balance transfer or card with 0% interest.
    Giant Talon ... with a few upgrades

  16. #66
    Digital Toast
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    When my grandmother passed she left all her grandchildren a little money. I used it to buy my Turner 5spot. I think of her every time I ride it. I'm pretty sure she would have strongly disagreed with me buying a bike that cost that much. Oh well.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeroack View Post
    When my grandmother passed she left all her grandchildren a little money. I used it to buy my Turner 5spot. I think of her every time I ride it. I'm pretty sure she would have strongly disagreed with me buying a bike that cost that much. Oh well.
    I'm much luckier but in a reverse situation. I love my grandmother, too. She's still with us at age 97. Lucky me. Lucky all of us grandchildren.

    But her limited social security and Medicaid doesn't pay for vitamins, supplements and healthier foods. So I give her a good chunk of money every month. Needless to say, her legacy is not about money because she doesn't have any. I hope to support her for many more years to come. Please don't leave us yet, grandma!

    Now, when my new bike arrives (ordered last week), I'm pretty sure she would be happy to see that I have enough to treat myself.

    It helps me to ride harder and faster.
    Last edited by solidass; 01-23-2013 at 08:30 AM.

  18. #68
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    I bought all of my 3 bicycles in parts and assembled them by myself. For the payment, I save 10% of my monthly wage to this activity. And at the end of the year I am able to buy a complete bike with only top level parts.

    I started to do this 4 years ago, and in 2 or 3 months I will be able to buy my forth bicycle (third titanium !)

    If I don't have the cash, I save money until I get the needed amount. That always surprise and impress my wife, and with that saving I am still able to save money for buying a future house and invite my fiancee to the restaurant.

    And for me I prefer buying a bicycle in parts rather than buying a complete bike that you will have to change the wheels, stem and handlebars. It finally does not cost more.
    Chistole Audax Club - "Unity, Pride and Charcuterie"

  19. #69
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    I charged mine then paid it off in a month. I do not ever charge what I cannot pay off in a month.

  20. #70
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    I built mine from parts, but paid cash for all of those.

  21. #71
    EMBA Member
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    "If I don't have the cash, I save money until I get the needed amount. That always surprise and impress my wife, and with that saving I am still able to save money for buying a future house and invite my fiancee to the restaurant"

    Something is wrong with this sentence but I'm having trouble figuring it out?

  22. #72
    DFL>DNF>DNS
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    I had my co-worker buy it for me!! I wasn't in the market, well I knew the time was coming. I wanted to upgrade to a 29er and a facebook friend posted up a Voodoo Dambala for $700. Didn't have the cash at the time, so my co-worker gave me a 0% loan. What a guy!!
    Ski. Ride. Hike. Be.
    My Two Schillingsworth

  23. #73
    RideDirt
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    Cash .. I think thats usually how it works.

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by aedubber View Post
    Cash .. I think thats usually how it works.
    Well, maybe in your country.

  25. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by brigadier View Post
    That always surprise and impress my wife, and with that saving I am still able to save money for buying a future house and invite my fiancee to the restaurant.
    Woah! A wife and a fiancee? I wanna start a new thread and title it "How did you get a wife and a fiancee?"
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you’ll crash.
    - Julie Furtado

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