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  1. #101
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    Bike shop had some slightly used demo models on the cheap, saved a bundle.

  2. #102
    El Gorrrriiii
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shakester View Post
    I Ebayed the majority of my bike in pieces. Ended up spending well over $1000.00 which is probably what I would of spent if I bought the bike as a whole, but this way, I get to put the parts I want on them as well as putting the bike together myself which the best part for me. Plus, I love bidding on stuff. I picked up a great 2010 Giant XTC1, brand new, for $200.00.
    If only I can get a great deal on a Anthem 29er or Trance 29er
    Giant Talon ... with a few upgrades

  3. #103
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    I have a savings account, specifically for bike-related purchases. X amount of money gets diverted there the 1st of every month from my checking account (plus random deposits, such as tax refund or cash deposits). I don't allow myself to exceed whatever is in savings. Every month, when it comes time to pay the credit card bill (100% paid off, every month), I'll move however much I spent that month into the bill-pay account.

    So, in a round about way, I pay cash.

    It helps that I have pretty pedestrian tastes. Road bike is a Surly Pacer. Mountain bike is a NOS Fuji 29er that I got for cheap.

  4. #104
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    Cash!!!
    2017 Cannondale Scalpel Si Carbon 3 (27.5)
    2013 Specialized Camber Carbon
    2011 Specialized Stumpjumper Comp

  5. #105
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    Sold some stock. Paid cash.

  6. #106
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    Inheritance money, otherwise never would have been able to afford it with one teen and one in college.
    Jamis Dakar XC Comp
    Jamis Quest
    Selle Italia Ldy Gel saddles

  7. #107
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    Bought a frame on CL. Got the components from price point and jenson usa. Then built it myself. Saved a lot doing it that way. Most of the parts were from the previous year,so they were a bit cheaper.
    They've done studies, you know. 60% of the time, it works every time

  8. #108
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    107 responses so far and not a single person being irresponsible with their finances buying overly expensive bike parts.

    I'm sure no one has exaggerated their financial position and to that I say...cheers

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Sloth View Post
    107 responses so far and not a single person being irresponsible with their finances buying overly expensive bike parts.

    I'm sure no one has exaggerated their financial position and to that I say...cheers
    I thought this thread was about bikes as opposed to bike parts.

    How can you be so sure that "no one has exaggerated their financial position"? You're implying that everyone in this thread has lied about their ability to buy. Bizarre. Did the cash buyers buy with...less cash?
    '12 S-Works Stumpjumper carbon HT
    '13 Specialized Carve Comp
    '94 S-Works M2

  10. #110
    the half breed devil
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark in Baltimore View Post
    I thought this thread was about bikes as opposed to bike parts.

    How can you be so sure that "no one has exaggerated their financial position"? You're implying that everyone in this thread has lied about their ability to buy. Bizarre. Did the cash buyers buy with...less cash?
    sir...may i kindly suggest that you go for a ride...or have a drink?

    cheers!

  11. #111
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    I wouldn't say that "i paid in cash" and "noone is being irresponsible with overly expensive parts" are mutually exclusive statements.

    As for me? I sold my soul to the devil for rock and roll.
    Unfortunatey this was when new wave was coming in so I hawked the rock and now I've got a bike!!

    Nah, actually I got a job at a LBS at the same time as my mainstream job, agreed to work for bikes or parts instead of cash. Accumulated much working 13-days in a row.
    Funny thing that.. working a job just to support your hobby.
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  12. #112
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    I just picked up a couple extra days of overtime and payed cash... :-)

  13. #113
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    My LBS does financing through a local financial company that has a 90 days same as cash no interest policy. I used that and had it paid off before the interest would have kicked in.

    If that wasn't an option, I would have saved for a couple more months and paid cash (well, credit card that gets paid off every month).

  14. #114
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    Cash money only for toys.

    Granted, I technically paid with a credit card to get the airline points, then paid it off right away.

  15. #115
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    I have a great house and a wife and kids, work an average job and to be honest there just isnt room for a 3K bike..would I love one hell yeah. I ride an older bike that I do enjoy and
    worked a PT job last year to put a new build together piece by piece..it was a bit more $$ than i anticipated with shipping cost, but I got some great parts and a new bike
    "foot to pedal, wheel to dirt, there is no substitute for the act of riding "

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkad View Post
    I have a great house and a wife and kids, work an average job and to be honest there just isnt room for a 3K bike..would I love one hell yeah. I ride an older bike that I do enjoy and
    worked a PT job last year to put a new build together piece by piece..it was a bit more $$ than i anticipated with shipping cost, but I got some great parts and a new bike
    Nothing wrong with that at all.

    Heck, I HAVE a "3k bike" and more times than not I find myself riding my $500 single speed. Don't need to drop a ton of money to have fun.

  17. #117
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    Bug your lbs a lot...make friends...ask the right questions...buy demos...pay cash. My motto is to usually buy used. First new bike I bought was after 20 years of riding, this year. Save it up, sleep on it, offer discount price for paying cash.


    Sent from my XT907 using Tapatalk 2

  18. #118
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    Bought mine on Craigslist. The guy just found out he was going to be a new PaPa. Know how that goes...

  19. #119
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    cash at LBS

  20. #120
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    Went riding with a buddy for the first time, afterwards went and bought a bike

  21. #121
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    I like to buy outdated models on craigslist

  22. #122
    High Desert MTBer
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    I had the same bike(s) for many years, then dropped 400 pounds in the UK on a new Trek for cash in 2004. This kept me going a while, then had a bit of a hiatus when I moved to AZ. Next thing I did was have an epiphany in a bike shop when I saw what was now on offer, but managed to turn down the expensive FS options they were trying to sell me. I could not believe the prices and wasn't sure what was best for me, so came out with a new Rockhopper I bought for cash. Then I quickly realised I wanted a full sus bike after all, so I did a lot of research, and decided I wanted a 5" travel bike that weighed 25 lbs, and would cost $2500. After a few months of ferreting out deals online, I wound up with a Salsa El Kaboing frame, Fox fork, and a bunch of top notch stuff on it that cost me $2600 and weighed in at just over 26 lbs. I almost managed it! It took a couple of months, but saved me a bunch of money. I love the bike and have ridden the crap out of it for over 2 years now, and see no great reason to upgrade. It does most of what I need, and when stuff breaks or wears out I go online and search for replacements... If I see bargains for parts I know I will eventually need, I will sometimes buy them if the price is unavoidable.
    I did buy a demo C'dale Rize 2 18 months ago when I was away on tour, got a great price and needed a second bike for those times when I was traveling, or needed a ride when one bike was down. Cash always.
    It's all Here. Now.

  23. #123
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    I bought my bike second hand on ebay for under half the retail price, and no problems at all, everything runs great. Highly reccomend ebay.
    If its not Fox, get forked.

  24. #124
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    My bikes were each less than $500.00 each and the first bike was a birthday present. My mountain bike was a previous year's model that was on sale (I think I saved about $250) and I saved for it by dropping all of my pocket change in a jar at the end of each day. I'm in Canada so pocket change can include $1 and $2 coins and over time it does build up. Last February I declared the jar "Mtn bike fund" and in late September I found a Craigslist ad for the bike I was looking at for a happy price. The rest of the change is now earmarked for pedals Thomson seat post and possibly a saddle.
    2011 Jamis Durango 1.0 Femme
    2005 KHS T&C commuter bike

  25. #125
    29er and 26er
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    Short answer --- cash.


    1st bike many, many, many years ago, I paid cash in a pawn shop.
    2nd bike was previous years bike I got from my LBS. I paid cash for this one as well.

  26. #126
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    I always save up some cash and then sell my previous bike. Then I take that cash and typically buy a year or two old bike or last year's frame on a clearance deal. Sometimes I save my higher end parts and swap those over to a new frame.

  27. #127
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    I just bought a new bike a couple of weeks ago (Salsa Fargo Ti). I just realized that it was my first "new" bike I had bought since 1990. That one was a Bridgestone MB1. All of my other bikes have been bought used or frame upgrades with old parts or new parts on old frames. I currently have 5 road and 2 mountain bikes, plus a couple of frames just sitting. I scraped and saved to buy that MB1 back then but with age comes increased income and I didn't think twice when the deal on the Fargo presented itself. I still prefer a bargain and/or building it up yourself over just walking in an buying a bike. I really wish I hadn't sold the MB1 but I needed cash for another build (which is long gone).

  28. #128
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    At first I was a little surprised that most everyone on this thread was so financially responsible, but after thinking about it for a minute it makes sense for a few reasons:

    1. Average age on mtbr is in the 40s I believe which tend to be more responsible and have more disposable income.
    2. Anyone admitting to paying with a credit card then skipping payments (or making interest only payments) is going to get lambasted by the responsible guys.
    3. Just because someone pays cash for a bike doesn't automatically mean he's being finacially responsible. He may be skipping other bills or not paying his child support, etc.

    Having said that, it's good to see that folks are being financially responsible with "non-essential" expenses. I use that term guardedly because riding is pretty dang "essential" to most of us.


    I make good money but we live on a strict budget. Live debt free including our house, have 6 months emergency fund saved, medical fund, pay cash for everything including cars. etc. (Yes we are Dave Ramsey disciples) I only allow myself $400 a month for my bike habit, including bike trips. It's tough sometimes but I stick to it.

    So buying a new bike takes some patience and planning. For my latest bike purchase I sold off or parted out my two main bikes and saved my monthly bike allowance for 3-4 months and I'll have enough when the new Chilcotin comes in March (amazing how much easier it is to save the bike allowance when there's no bikes in the garage to spend money on).
    Last edited by KRob; 02-14-2013 at 04:21 PM.
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
    Isaiah 58:14

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  29. #129
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    Yeah there's something of a self selection bias: those who browse mtbr narrows it down, those willing to comment here makes it even more constricted.

    My bike is about high end now and it's just been years of upgrades and saving.

  30. #130
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    Was a smoker for ten years, gave up in September 99.

    My hobby back then was dirt bike / trail riding. I figured out how much I had been spending on cigarettes each month and that became my motorbiking budget. I had three new bikes over 10 years and a bunch of rider equipment. Couple of years ago I sold off my motorbikes and all the gear I had accumulated and this became my mountain bike fund.... bought my bikes that way - 2 new and one second hand.

    My monthly spend now on MTB related activities is the same as the cost of smoking - the great thing with this is the cost of smoking keeps going up so my hobby money is index linked!

  31. #131
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    swipe to get points, then paid off when bill came
    2011 Specialized Rockhopper Expert 29er

  32. #132
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    Sold my previous 29er Orbea Alma to my brother added some cash to that and ended with a Flash 1. :-)
    Ibis Mojo SL, Sram X7/9 2x10, Fox Talas 110, 130, 150
    Orbea Alma H30
    Cannondale Flash 1 Ally
    Raleigh RC 8000

  33. #133
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    made sure to buy Pre-K--before kids. Now I have my road bike and mountain bike for life (though my road bike is perfect, I find myself jonesing for a new mtb ride)

  34. #134
    DFMBA.org
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    First bike, GE Capital financing thru my lbs. 12 months same as cash. If I can borrow someone else's money for a year for free, why wouldn't I? 2nd bike, stock options baby!

    Sent from my mountain bike while crashing
    Please donate to IMBA or your local IMBA chapter. It's trail karma.

  35. #135
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    The first (adult-life, that is) was bought in July 2011, for a 200-mile touring trip in the Austrian and Italian Alps. It was one of these more sporty hybrids - a Cube Nature Pro.

    Then I was hooked. I started taking it up the mountains where I live (paved), then started taking it up the mountains on unpaved tracks. It wasn't really living up to the task, so I started lurking in this forum.

    Then I sold the Cube. And I sold my car which I was using pretty much once every two weeks (the perks of living in Europe: you don't really need a motorised set of wheels). Then, last December, I bought a new FS29er. Now I want a road bike, too.

  36. #136
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    My LBS owner is the devil he shows me all the new stuff and every time a new bike or part comes out I desire...online classifieds fire sale.

  37. #137
    I like turtles
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    I should have actually mentioned it - I actually sold some stock options to get my latest bike. I used the CC, then paid it off the next month with a portion of the proceeds from the stock sale.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  38. #138
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    i did my weekly visit to freewheeler bike and i thought to my self i think its time to stop using my hard tail and get a full suspension frame. so i was looking at their frames and saw way in back with other frames piled on top was a fuji adventure hi trail frame. i instantly fell in love with it. so i asked Gordy the owner what do you want for this frame? he replied $100 and she's all yours. so i migrated the parts from my old frame onto my new frame. so that's how i bought my bike.
    Last edited by trail-adventure; 01-30-2013 at 07:49 AM.

  39. #139
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    All of the current bikes and all of the bikes purchased in the past 10-15 years have been paid for with cash. I almost always buy used and to get the best deals, I offer cash.

    Back when I worked in shops and bought new, I bought on a shop employee deal. For several years, I would sell the previous year's bike to a friend for whatever the new model was going to cost me. I had friends waiting for me to get my new bike each year so they could buy the previous year's bike. Basically my only investment was the amount I paid for my first bike from the shop and then each year my upgrade was paid for.

  40. #140
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    Me and my girl both have new bikes. We both are full grown mid 30's adults with career jobs. No kids and no plans to have any. We live a life of fun and adventure. Brought out the credit cards, paid for new bikes, sold old bikes and made the payments. Bikes are used, made to do what they are breed for and paid for ASAP. What can I say, most days life is good. Some days we fight,others we ride..!!!!
    2011 Enduro Comp.

  41. #141
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    i guess pimping your wife would be a bad idea?

  42. #142
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    Using tax return and had a major parts garage sale on ebay to fund my latest build. Before that it was all credit card, trying to steer away from that nowadays.

  43. #143
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    After tossing half of my paycheck into savings and then paying bills I have a bit of disposable income leftover for hobbies. It helps that I make a decent paycheck.

  44. #144
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    How ?.....
    Piece by piece.
    Reading and learning.
    roccowt.
    rocnbikemeld

  45. #145
    Rider, Builder, Dreamer
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    I should also that I have always helped my gear addiction by selling my old stuff to help buy new stuff. I have also bought used to save money and bought a lot of things when I worked at a shop in college and got a discount; I still have quite a bit of it!
    Sounds like the boat I'm in (including the geologist part). Financial Aid helped me get previous bikes going (I built up 2 from the frame up) and since I have been in two mountain biking classes, TA'd for one, and been the president of our student Mountain Biking Club, it's all been rather justified. I've paid my dues at the local shop, will start really truly working there soon. I'll be picking up a 2013 Stumpy FSR Expert Evo once I do. Wonderful.

    To pay for this next bike I'm parting out my Remedy and my Jamis Bam, and am going borderline hermit status on the weekend and skipping out on the stereotypical college student debauchery.
    Go ride your bike.

  46. #146
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    Waited for tax return, then drove to the bike shop, test rode my bike of interest and in my price point, and finally paid for my bike.

  47. #147
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    Bought the frame from CRC on sale, then pieced it together one piece at a time as I could afford. I't more expensive than just saving and buying a bike but I have every part I want and choose.

  48. #148
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    1. Bought a decent bike from an online retailer with decent parts.
    2. Purchased a 2009 Marin Mount Vision 5.8 frame
    3. Swapped all parts from the online bike to the FS frame
    4. Saved the spec list from the Marin site on the actual 2009 MountVision 5.8 and every time I had some cash to spend on me I purchased parts to built the same/better bike as they were selling for $3600

    Only thing I'm missing now it a Fox fork but I'm fine with the one I have and enjoy the bike.

    P.S. the link in my sig is the old bike right after swapping the parts from the first bike. I didn't upload any pics with the upgraded parts but all the parts that were originally switched from the first bike to the FS frame have been upgraded and the HT bike has been put back together and sold to family member

  49. #149
    I'm SUCH a square....
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    Quote Originally Posted by the-one1 View Post
    Uncle Sam's tax giveback.
    This. Been doing it that way since '03. Bought a full-suss Motobecane from BikesDirect that year, and had to pull the parts off it to put on a Pacific hardtail that crutched me through the last half of '04 -- the Moto frame BROKE, got no support or feedback. (That's why I'm so anti-BikesDirect....) '05 was the last year I bought a frame & parts that lasted less than 5 years.

    '03 was also the last year I bought a complete bike; ever since, I've been building up my own mixes. (Guaranteed, no one else has an '06 Kona Coiler Supreme with Sun Equalizer wheels, a Nixon fork in urban camo, and an NC-17 riser bar clamped by an Evolve Sterling stem, with a Selle SMP Trk saddle....)
    A bike is the only drug with no bad side effects....

  50. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by rossluzz View Post
    I always save up some cash and then sell my previous bike. Then I take that cash and typically buy a year or two old bike or last year's frame on a clearance deal. Sometimes I save my higher end parts and swap those over to a new frame.
    ^^ This. Usually I buy a used bike, or older model new bike or frame, then swap parts. I built my S-Works for 3 K including brand new frame and full warranty.

  51. #151
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    I freely admitted I paid probably about $100 in interest paying off my bike's credit card purchase. It was too good a deal to pass up, I probably saved more than that $100, but that doesn't really count.

    I see a lot of posts stating that "it's a toy and not a necessity" so they only pay cash. I strongly feel myself that a bike is an investment in my health, my well being, and my sanity. I'd rather be out riding my expensive bike after work and enjoying it rather than wishing I would have bought it while riding a clunker.
    I really wish more people would finance a bicycle over a flat screen t.v. the world would be a better place imho.



    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    At first I was a little surprised that most everyone on this thread was so financially responsible, but after thinking about it for a minute it makes sense for a few reasons:

    1. Average age on mtbr is in the 40s I believe which tend to be more responsible and have more disposable income.
    2. Anyone admitting to paying with a credit card then skipping payments (or making interest only payments) is going to get lambasted by the responsible guys.
    3. Just because someone pays cash for a bike doesn't automatically mean he's being finacially responsible. He may be skipping other bills or not paying his child support, etc.

    Having said that, it's good to see that folks are being financially responsible with non-essential expenses.


    I make good money but we live on a strict budget. Live debt free including our house, have 6 months emergency fund saved, medical fund, pay cash for everything including cars. etc. (Yes we are Dave Ramsey disciples) I only allow myself $400 a month for my bike habit, including bike trips. It's tough sometimes but I stick to it.

    So buying a new bike takes some patience and planning. For my latest bike purchase I sold off or parted out my two main bikes and saved my monthly bike allowance for 3-4 months and I'll have enough when the new Chilcotin comes in March (amazing how much easier it is to save the bike allowance when there's no bikes in the garage to spend money on).

  52. #152
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    You make a lot of good points. Paying on credit is a matter of personal opinions-but I'm glad it worked out for you. I would, too, if I could have-but I took the route of buying a bike with a frame I like (Norco Range 3) and I've progressively made it more well equipped than the Range 1. I wanted to ride, it worked out for me. Some people think what I did is stupid, that's okay. Maybe it is stupid: some would say I should have just gone all out from the get go and bought a frame and saved myself some money-but that would have taken longer and I decided to live a life where I got the experience of riding that bike then and there-so I don't really think so. That and I ultimately built my own wheelset and gained a lot of personal preferences-so things worked out. Maybe.

    I also strongly agree about bikes being one of those things that helps with mental sanity. Biking is one of those peripheral things in life and a lot of people "fight to have time for" while some simply "have time" for it. When I go ride, I typically am relieved it's one of those things I "have time" for, lately. However, I recognize that there are healthier alternatives for working out. With the crashes, I think I'll be feeling it. I'm already feeling it.

    Quote Originally Posted by nOOky View Post
    I freely admitted I paid probably about $100 in interest paying off my bike's credit card purchase. It was too good a deal to pass up, I probably saved more than that $100, but that doesn't really count.

    I see a lot of posts stating that "it's a toy and not a necessity" so they only pay cash. I strongly feel myself that a bike is an investment in my health, my well being, and my sanity. I'd rather be out riding my expensive bike after work and enjoying it rather than wishing I would have bought it while riding a clunker.
    I really wish more people would finance a bicycle over a flat screen t.v. the world would be a better place imho.

  53. #153
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    Skipped a few months of child support and then stopped paying my mortgage to get a mortgage modification because they wouldn't modify it if I was on time. After a few months $12K super bike!

    In reality I am very fortunate to be able to do as I please when it comes to bikes without effecting my monthly spending/savings. When I was younger I made bikes a big priority, but always paid cash except for my first high end bike which the shop owner where I worked let me pay over time.

  54. #154
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    I have a unique way of getting the bikes I want. I work full time for the Army and have 5 kids. I am in no way well off. I don't go into debt for bikes and I really like nice bikes.

    So, I got a "job" with the local bike shop. I work two hours in the evening Mon-Thurs and 9 hours on Friday. My weekends are mine. I get a great shop discount and the hours I work are credited towards any purchase I want to make in the shop.

    In the last year I've picked up a Giant Anthem Advanced X29er 0, a Giant TCX 2 cyclocross bike, tons of parts/clothing and nutritionals. I even get to ride any of the demo bikes anytime I'd like.

    I basically feel like a crack whore working for the dealer to get the fix I need. Love it!
    I'm a mountain bike guide in southwest Utah

  55. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    Skipped a few months of child support and then stopped paying my mortgage to get a mortgage modification because they wouldn't modify it if I was on time. After a few months $12K super bike!

    In reality I am very fortunate to be able to do as I please when it comes to bikes without effecting my monthly spending/savings. When I was younger I made bikes a big priority, but always paid cash except for my first high end bike which the shop owner where I worked let me pay over time.
    So, what that really means is, you screwed everyone over to get a bike. Including your own child. Not to mention the mortgage company and the tax payers that bailed out the mortgage companies.

  56. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    I have a unique way of getting the bikes I want. I work full time for the Army and have 5 kids. I am in no way well off. I don't go into debt for bikes and I really like nice bikes.

    So, I got a "job" with the local bike shop. I work two hours in the evening Mon-Thurs and 9 hours on Friday. My weekends are mine. I get a great shop discount and the hours I work are credited towards any purchase I want to make in the shop.

    In the last year I've picked up a Giant Anthem Advanced X29er 0, a Giant TCX 2 cyclocross bike, tons of parts/clothing and nutritionals. I even get to ride any of the demo bikes anytime I'd like.

    I basically feel like a crack whore working for the dealer to get the fix I need. Love it!
    Now there's a guy with morals, passion and a sound work ethic! + Rep for that!

  57. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    So, what that really means is, you screwed everyone over to get a bike. Including your own child.
    I guess sarcasm does not come through the computer, I was joking. If you read the second paragraph you would see the phrase "in reality"

    BTW I would love to see pictures of the Dino. It is a beautiful car.

  58. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    I guess sarcasm does not come through the computer, I was joking. If you read the second paragraph you would see the phrase "in reality"
    Sarcasm, sometimes goes over my head. I'm glad to hear you didn't do that! + Rep for that

  59. #159
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    Saved my money for 17 years, got a sponsorship, bought a brand new Niner Air Nine RDO XO loaded beast. Hopefully my last year in the Juniour race circuit will be a big one!!

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  60. #160
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    I can't recall if I've already posted in this thread..... anyway, I bought my bikes on credit with 0% interest - so just the cash price over X months.

    I agree with n00ky, I saw it as an investment in me and my health. Previously, I was paying about $40/week in train fares to get to/from work. Now I pay about $10/week in finance and get two hours riding every day. I see that as a pretty good deal.

    If you can pay cash for your stuff, obviously that's better. But if it comes down to it, buy-now/pay-later is better than sit-now/die-earlier.

  61. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    I guess sarcasm does not come through the computer, I was joking. If you read the second paragraph you would see the phrase "in reality"

    BTW I would love to see pictures of the Dino. It is a beautiful car.
    Interesting thing about your first paragraph was that I've known many men to pull that kind of thing to afford their dream car and modify it.

  62. #162
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    Did a pro deal through work. The hardest part was deciding what to get. Ended up with a 29er.

  63. #163
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    In pieces... It spreads out the hit over several weeks and you can get deals if you look for them... Just built a niner jet 9 for under 2 grand... The secret is to focus on one or two parts at a time

  64. #164
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    I'll second what mjduct posted. Not only does it spread the hit out, it's also fun and you know your bike inside and out.
    2013 SC Tallboy C
    2011 Niner EMD9

  65. #165
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    I found a dealer that takes my EBT card, suckers.

  66. #166
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    Let's see.....

    My first bike was stolen from my garage at an apartment I lived at. Got a $1,200 insurance settlement from renter's insurance and was able to upgrade nicely.

    Unfortunately, coming back from a ride in the Sierra Foothills 2 years later, I completely forgot about the bike on the roof of my car as I pulled into the garage and was treated to the sound of high quality steel snapping at the down tube. Renter's insurance again to the rescue. Not a completely new bike but new frame, fork, bars and stem. Upgraded again to a nice S-Works frame this time.

    Had that bike for two years which then got stolen out of my truck while at work. I really wouldnt have blamed my insurance agent if he thought I was running some sort of scam but they paid it off again no questions asked. Thanks Allstate. With $4,000 in insurance proceeds (it pays to save receipts for everything), I got what was at the time a top of the line FS frame and full XTR. 6 months later, my insurance co dropped me. Totally understandable - guess I got my monies worth out of them.

    For my next bike to be purchased this spring, looks like I wont be able to rely on any insurance money. I'll have to do it the old fashioned way. OR rob a bank.

  67. #167
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    I bought my 2006 Yeti AS-X over a one year period of buying the parts as I could afford them. Altogether paid $2,100 (2006 Yeti at the time was going for $1900 for frame alone).

    My 2011 Trek Fuel EX 5 I bought on my Trek card at the bike shop and almost have it paid off.
    I don't use Strava. Don't need an application to tell me I am slow because I already know.

  68. #168
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    Local shop....walked in...I like this one....made it rain in that biatch...$500 cash for a 29er Marlin.....converted to single speed. Done.
    I asked God for a bike, but I know he doesn't work that way so I stole a bike & asked for forgiveness.

  69. #169
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    Good on yous guys, getting out there and doing it and doing it for a reason with passion is worth 100 times more than the dick who ignores people on his carbon-carbon-carbon.

    I justify all mine as "there is no price on fitness".... riding and keeping healthy is extending my life
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  70. #170
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    Bought mine online. Had to unless I wanted to take a 200+ mile round trip, which I didn't. I wanted a specific bike which as far as I could find out, isn't offered locally. Will pay off in full when the cc bill comes.

    Got a great deal at a LBS on the wife's bike which I bought yesterday, what with all the extras they provide. I gotta say, now that I've done it, LBS is the way to go! Paid cash.

    ETA:
    Quote Originally Posted by ozzybmx View Post
    I justify all mine as "there is no price on fitness".... riding and keeping healthy is extending my life
    Truer words were never spoken!

  71. #171
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    I worked a second job to help build up some extra cash which wasn't working so well. My amazing girlfriend chipped in some money as a Christmas present. Actually, if it weren't for her, I wouldn't have been motivated to get a new bike. She knew my then current ride was too small for me and that I wasn't enjoying riding as much. Off I went to the lbs, ordered and put a down payment on a bike that I had been researching. A week later, the bike was built and I test rode it. The remaining balance was going to wait until April when I get an annual bonus, but ended up going on a credit card until then.

    For me, it is not a toy or just for physical fitness. It is my medicine and therapy. I have come to realize that I need to be true to myself first before doing things for others, such as work. <Insert phrase> All work and no play... I could always continue with the go to work/home, work/home routine and feel like a robot. But I tend to be unhappy with my life that way. Hopping on my bike and going for a ride is what I really loved to do years ago. I look forward to and am enjoying reliving that lifestyle again and enjoying all there is to see out on the trails.

  72. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by R+P+K View Post
    If you can pay cash for your stuff, obviously that's better. But if it comes down to it, buy-now/pay-later is better than sit-now/die-earlier.
    Quote Originally Posted by gridtalker View Post
    I charged mine. Isnt that what most Americans do. We purchase things we cant afford with a credit card then worry about paying it off later
    lol.

    i needed to get my bike now and get going... easy to sit and do nothing!

    i applied for the trek credit card and was approved.

    went to the trek store and bought my 2012 fuel ex 6... i think the discount for the bike was something like $400 being an older model.

    the trek credit card does not accrue interest as long as it paid off within a year.

    so, i have budgeted and will pay it off before 11 months.

    happy biking everyone!

    joel

  73. #173
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    Cash, used, and today! Upgraded my 2001 Tracer to a like new 2010 Tracer. Can't wait to go riding tomorrow!

  74. #174
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    Well i work six days a week and start 6:30 in the morning and finish up to 6:00 in the afternoon. In six years of working for this company i have had one sick day and only six weeks leave.
    I was able to roll up with the cash to pay for my bike. And as my wife says you work hard you deserve it

  75. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rojo Grande' View Post
    Cash, used, and today! Upgraded my 2001 Tracer to a like new 2010 Tracer. Can't wait to go riding tomorrow!
    I wish I could go riding tomorrow...

  76. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wherewolf View Post
    Take the time to get a good education, get a good job, and mange your money wisely. But it takes far more patience and sacrifice than most people are wiling to make. I always pay cash for my bikes.

    <p align="center"><img border="4" src="http://stevenjwolf.com/mtbike/images/Big-Bike.jpg"><br>
    Haha you make it sound like getting a good education and a good job is easy. You do realize that a lot of people don't have wealthy parents or relatives to pay for their "good education" right? If only it was just a matter of "taking the time"...

  77. #177
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    I work at a local shop and we did an anonymous survey asking people 1. How much they make 2. How old they are 3. Sex 4. Why they ride 90% of the surveys said that they 1. Made on average 120k a year 2. average age was 47 3. 77% males 33% Females 4. 51% of the men ride to get away from there wife it was a hobby so they can get an outing.

    I personally buy bikes with an employee discount which is about 60% off MSRP and I also have a small company who plastered there name on my jersey for races. So sometimes working part time at a shop really helps with prices!!!

    I got the job btw by just hanging out up there all the time until the owner liked me and when he was hiring I was his first choice since I was already always there!

  78. #178
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    Excuses are for losers

    Quote Originally Posted by shredjekyll View Post
    Haha you make it sound like getting a good education and a good job is easy. You do realize that a lot of people don't have wealthy parents or relatives to pay for their "good education" right? If only it was just a matter of "taking the time"...
    Excuses are for losers. Nothing worthwhile is easy. And your excuses and lazy attitude are perhaps why you can't get a good job. I earned my education via military service and saving every dime I made. Nobody else gave me a cent.

  79. #179
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    Very carefully and after much research...but yes with cash also.
    A troll's day:1.Log on 2.Write sh*tty comments 3.Laugh 4.Notice dick is still small 5.Weep openly 6.Have mom make him a PB&J


  80. #180
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wherewolf View Post
    Excuses are for losers. Nothing worthwhile is easy. And your excuses and lazy attitude are perhaps why you can't get a good job. I earned my education via military service and saving every dime I made. Nobody else gave me a cent.
    Absolutely! I wasn't in the military but also earned and paid for my own education. Excuses are for losers.

  81. #181
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    Most of mine some one else threw away. Craigslist is also a friend!

  82. #182
    Hi There!
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    On my latest bike my wife said if I save up half the cost I could buy it, she said (and was right) that I never save up for anything. I mean really, any money I could save up was just money that would have gone in the bank or something anyway, but I agreed and saved up half then paid the rest with our travel miles credit card and paid that balance off the next month when the bill came.
    NTFTC

  83. #183
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    0% interest credit card. It's the only way to ride!

  84. #184
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    Cash.

  85. #185
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    Pay cash for everything. I start with a new perfect frame and use the best wheels I can build or buy. Components usually come from wealthy weight weenies depreciated takeoffs/upgrades via craigslist or ebay. If I want or have to buy new parts they usually come from heavily discounted European online retailers. I simply cannot afford to spend 3 to 7 thousand dollars for a minimum decent bike. No guilt in avoiding LBS middleman markup as I'm a far better mechanic and have more cycling experience than most of them in the first place.

    If I was a trendy impulse purchaser I'd be screwed! My four bikes took at least a couple years each to finish. They're more works of art in progress.

  86. #186
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    I got 2 of my bikes with cash from CL(Karate Monkey and Trek Transport cargo).
    I got my unicycle with cash from an MTBR member, used.
    And I bought 2 bikes new with zero interest credit cards/tax return money(pugs & colossal), new from bike shop.
    Do not regret. Each one gets plenty of ride time. My hubby would love it if I found more bikes used though...but in my short size, very rare.
    2014 Big Dummy
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    2015 Ice Cream Truck

  87. #187
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    I have two jerbs. One daily to pay the bills and a side hobby which pays for toys.
    Most purchases are on credit card, then pay it before the statement appears. I used to always pay in cash, but the extra bulge of wads in my skinny jeans offsets my junk bulge and looks weird.

  88. #188
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    How did you buy your bike ???

    As Randy Moss once said, straight cash homie. But I had saved (been waiting for the ok from the wife) for several months.

  89. #189
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    Sold my CRF250 and bought a bike for myself and wife.

  90. #190
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    Mmmm. I remember it. I had gotten into cycling the summer before I left for a backpacking trip of South America. I saved up all my nickels and dimes for three months abroad, leaving the first week of November. Yes, that meant traveling over Christmas.

    I was 23 and had no guts. I ended up coming home after a six week trip through Peru and Bolivia, not making it to Chile or Argentina. The good news was that I had all this extra money in my pocket and my parents had already decided that they would chip in for a new bike for Christmas whenever I returned from my trip.

    Now there is really only one shop in Buffalo, NY (no, Bert's is no better than Walmart, they told my friend they don't make steel frames anymore, lololol); Campus Wheelworks. It was a snowy afternoon and I already had my next adventure in mind, cross country touring. I'd only done one camping trip on my dad's old Iron Horse but I wanted a touring specific bike. So of course they recommended the Long Haul Trucker, but there were things I didn't like, I didn't like the small wheels (albeit now I like that idea for Latin America, but I digress), and I didn't like how relaxed it felt. I test rode it and the Cross-Check. I really loved the zip and flow of the X-Check, so I decided to think it over. Called a friend who owned a Cross-Check and sealed the deal on how much he loved it.



    The second time I bought a Cross Check was in Chicago, IL. After my first X-Check had been stolen the week before I thought it was over. I considered just taking a train out or whatever, then after cooling off for a bit I realized I might just have enough to buy a new bike and make it. I ordered almost everything I wanted from Smart Bike Parts (would only half recommend vs. Campus Wheelworks), no Tubus Racks, now I had Surly racks (sooooo heavy) and a 2012 v. 2011. They upgraded the parts as opposed to the work I did on the first X-Check. They finished it on July 5th and I was back on the road.

  91. #191
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    I bought mine with money

  92. #192
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    Found a KILLER deal on a Spec. Stumpy carbon single speed 29 frame. Seller included original seat post, Romin expert saddle (Ti rails), Spec 90 Stem, spec carbon low rise bars, all at a cool $1,000. I had been previously putting money on my account at my LBS and had over the past 5 months accumulated about $700, with which I bought my Reba RLT 100mm at about $520. From there I purchased my Sram XX1 crankset for 200$ here on MTBR, and my Sram PF30 BB through the shop at 30% off which made it around $32 I think? I sold my old GT Peace 9er single speed but kept a brakeset I had made out of XT levers and SLX calipers and the ridiculously burly OEM cheesy wheelset it came with and grips that I later replaced. I'm still just borrowing the headset from a friend, but the rest I kinda had lying around. Since then I have VERY slowly built up a new set of wheels. DT 240s > Stan's Arch EX > DT Revolution spokes. Bought a $50 Ti RWS skewer, Surly 18T Cog (want a 17t now though) Surly Stainless Steel single speed spacer kit, Sram 8spd chain, Spec. Zee Cage (right) 29x2.3 Purgatoy (front), Spec Fast Trak 29x2.2 (rear). Stan's Valves, ESI foam grips, did some trading with a friend for the 140mm rear rotor and bought some other doo-dads with shop discount and the rest is history. So, over the course of a year If I add it all together I'm right around $3,000 on my single speed build. I think I have a problem.
    Nature never said one thing, and wisdom another...

  93. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by austinTRON View Post
    I had been previously putting money on my account at my LBS and had over the past 5 months accumulated about $700
    That's risky!

  94. #194
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    Work Bonus!
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  95. #195
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    I spent the entire winter watching for sales on the various MTB sites. I also caught a few nice deals on ebay for slightly used parts. Doing this over the winter allowed me to not jump on the first deal I saw.Overall, I spent about 2700-2800 on my 29er HT and I absolutely love the bike. I'm doing the same this winter on a FS 29er. I'm currently researching FS 29er frames and I'm hoping to have the choices narrowed down soon.

  96. #196
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    That's risky!
    I was actually planning on using the money on my account originaly to buy a Carve SL at 20% off since there is never enough in stock to EP one. So I looked at getting a Jett for my wife but since the 2014 early launch was right around the corner I figured I'd hold off. Then I found this killer deal on the stumpy! Waiting pays off.

    Did I mention I got those DT 240s right here on MTBR for $350 for the set? Easy to find good deals if you have patience.
    Nature never said one thing, and wisdom another...

  97. #197
    No Stranger to danger....
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    I started off with a cheap bike on the trails, then i waited for a guy with a great bike to be rude to me on the trail, then i just bashed him and took his bike, id suggest this method to everybody
    Dont ever let the truth get in the way of a funny story....

  98. #198
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    I paid a lot of dues a long time ago, and now people give me bikes.

    Nice ones.

  99. #199
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    Quote Originally Posted by shredjekyll View Post
    Haha you make it sound like getting a good education and a good job is easy. You do realize that a lot of people don't have wealthy parents or relatives to pay for their "good education" right? If only it was just a matter of "taking the time"...
    Getting a good job is not easy. No one said it was. Guess what else. Getting the job is only the beginning. You have to work to keep it too. Someone else wants it. You are not going to stumble bass-ackwards into 40K, 50K, $100K+ per year.

    I do not have wealthy parents or relatives. It is called sacrifice and busting your a$$. If you think people get everything from their parents you are making excuses for your own situation.

    After high school, I enlisted in the Navy - took advantage of all the education I could get from them. Used the GI bill to finish college and go to law school. Worked 30+ hrs per week when I was a full time undergrad student. Did law school in less than 2.5 yrs - married with a baby.

    There is no excuse for not being able to afford education. You can get about $10K in federal guaranteed student loans per year - Online, credit score does not matter. Start at community college, transfer to state school. Or begin in a trade. There is a lack of people with trade skills. Many are paid well. Don't mess around, get it done. Then chuckle to yourself when people on Internet forums complain that only doctors and lawyers can afford X bike.

  100. #200
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    How did you buy your bike ???

    Lets not turn this into a pissing match.

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