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  1. #1
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    Heat Index > Passion

    No frickin way I'm riding in this weather. It's dangerous out there.


  2. #2
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    Hot and humid for sure. Walked the dogs this morning and that's it for me. Not going outside anymore today.

  3. #3
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    I had planned on doing an early ride today, nothing too crazy, but the heat won. Well, yesterday's heat too. It was 120+ INSIDE some parts of our plant and about 107 in my area. needless to say, I was pretty well zapped before I even got up today. To the pool with the kids.
    I'm not big-boned, I'm a Clyde.

  4. #4
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    Decided to ride last evening around 8:30 pm, after it cooled down to 94. I found that the asphalt bike path to the local golf course turns its' sprinklers on near sunset. Sounds good right? Unfortunately, it was hot water and felt like 150% humidity. Good sauna workout. Now I'm hoping it wasn't contaminated as well. At least I got 8 miles in and diarrhea hasn't kicked in yet.
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  5. #5
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    I rode yesterday and damn near died! Be careful out there!
    Grit, spit, and a whole lot of duct tape!

  6. #6
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    if you ride in the heat, listen to your body, and make sure you drink cold water.

    the cold water thing I never followed in the past, but it definitely helps keep you cool. I put at least a tray of ice cubes in my camelback before riding.

  7. #7
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    I was feeling guilty sitting here in the AC. I'm glad I'm not the only one not riding.

  8. #8
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    Just threw a new fork on my rig too.. All I want to do is get out and ride, but alas, I've been beat by the heat. Hope this comes to an end pretty damn soon.

  9. #9
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    We rode in the suck at 5:30pm, 105F + the heat index. One rider starts getting light headed, 5 min's later nausea and headache. Uh oh. I happen to be packing ice with water in my Camelback. My buddy who's a Marine knew this and bummed a few ice cubes. He placed the ice on the underside (soft part) of the wrist of the rider who (apparently) was experiencing heat stroke. 5 min's later...good to go. Headed straight out to the cars (6 miles) but was much shorter than the anticipated 14 mile ride. Better safe than sorry.

    This was the first time I've seen that trick. According to the Marine, this is a fairly common way to cool down in the "sand box". Just make sure the ice goes direct to the skin and your wrist is facing up with ice on top.

    Lucky I had ice in my Camelpack. Ice cold water in these temp's ROCKS!!!!

  10. #10
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    In a rare feat of motivation and self discipline, I got up at 7:30am last Sunday to ride early and try to beat the heat. It didn't help much. I was on the trail by 9:15am but it was so hot and humid it was like riding in a tropical rain forest. That was several days before it got *really* hot.
    I haven't been on a bike all week and it;s making me really grumpy.
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  11. #11
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    I did the ten mile commute to work on the road bike this morning. It was hot at 6:30 am. I just rode home from work and the 10 mile trip felt like twenty miles. I hydrated all morning, so I didn't get sick, but I did feel the heat.

    It's damned hot!

  12. #12
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    Which evil to pick: early when it's a little cooler and more humid or later when it's hotter but less humid. Both choices suck. It's a 116 heat index currently in MD.

  13. #13
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    Wow....and I complain when the thermometer heads towards 80 degrees. It's about 70 here today.
    Good thing cuz I'm a fat kid....hot weather and I do not get along very well.

  14. #14
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    It's 91* here pretty humid and I'm going to be riding in about an hr. again. Yesterday I did 3hrs brought my camelback and was fine. Wore under armour/ spandex bottoms and cargo shorts so I didnt sweat and get bit up. The covering inside the trails is a little cooler which helps. Just go out, have fun, and be careful..

  15. #15
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    cooler

    Try this to keep your ice water icy cold.....

    - Put ice and refrigerated water in the Camelbak.
    - Then wrap the bladder in styrofoam sheeting - like the bag that comes wrapped around electronics, monitors, etc.
    - Then wrap in it all in silver mylar - I cut up one of those survival "blankets"

    There, you have an ultralight cooler.

    I still had really cold water 5 hours later.

  16. #16
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    I've been doing my riding later at night in the dark. I find that the sun wears me down a lot faster than the heat and the 5-10* that it cools off helps enough that I can go out and ride around the neighborhood for an hour.
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  17. #17
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    I hate all of you. My hand is fractured so I couldn't ride in this heat even if I wanted to.

  18. #18
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    Oooops, I must've accidentally clicked on the girls forum…

  19. #19
    Cheaa
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    Quote Originally Posted by deadbolt View Post
    Oooops, I must've accidentally clicked on the girls forum…
    Not here I just checked, 2 round egg shaped objects and 1 cylinder type device w/ extended attachment if needed

  20. #20
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    I went for a short ride the other day and got almost back to the parking lot when it caught up with me. Had to sit till my head quit spinning and I lost all the gatorade I had already drank but I finally made it to my car and cranked the a/c. Think I'll just stay home and watch bike racing online for a little bit, this heat and humidity ain't no joke.

  21. #21
    turtles make me hot
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    It's 102 here. I'm gettin' off work in a few hours. I'll probably do a night ride.

    Quarter Scottish here. Heat, cold... Nothing bothers me.
    Last edited by NYrr496; 07-22-2011 at 04:35 PM.
    I like turtles

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by client_9 View Post
    Try this to keep your ice water icy cold.....

    - Put ice and refrigerated water in the Camelbak.
    - Then wrap the bladder in styrofoam sheeting - like the bag that comes wrapped around electronics, monitors, etc.
    - Then wrap in it all in silver mylar - I cut up one of those survival "blankets"

    There, you have an ultralight cooler.

    I still had really cold water 5 hours later.
    We do frequent rides over 100 WITH a dab of humidity in central texas. I'll have to try the mylar, but I started doing this little trick 8-10 years ago. Find a plastic cup with roughly the same circumference as the opening in a camebak. Freeze 1 or 2 cups of water then drop them in the camelbak so you have a nice long frozen tube inside. Large chunks vs. cubes helps lower the surface area and you get colder water longer. The refrigerated water tip helps too. I usually get 3+ hours of nice COLD water without any sort of insulation and we usually stop and top off mid ride and the ice still last!

    Also, don't forget those electrolytes...bonking in BFE in triple digits es no bueno! I do a triple strength mix in a water bottle & just water in the camelbak + carry some other electrolyte tabs as backup.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by deadbolt View Post
    Oooops, I must've accidentally clicked on the girls forum…
    I think it's genetic. Some people have a higher heat tolerance.
    I'm of Scottish descent.
    I'm a sweaty, pink mess by the top of the first climb.
    However drinking whisky comes quite easily to me.


  24. #24
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    Good ride today, get out early when it's still a bit cooler than a bazillion, ice cubes in camelbak. The trails are a bit cooler since mostly covered in shade from the trees.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by client_9 View Post
    I think it's genetic. Some people have a higher heat tolerance.
    I'm of Scottish descent.
    I'm a sweaty, pink mess by the top of the first climb.
    However drinking whisky comes quite easily to me.

    I was just ribbing…

    Me, I hate the cold. I'd rather it be 100 than 30 any day of the week. I'm an absolute puss when it comes to cold. I'll ride when it's 100+. 45-50? Forget about it…

    I'm part Scottish myself BTW...

  26. #26
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    I posted this story in my regional forum yesterday, but I figure it's worth sharing here as well for a few laughs and lessons re-learned...
    ----
    Holy hell!!! I went riding tonight at 6:30, and my thermometer still read 110deg! I got a rear pinch-flat (damnit!) five minutes into the ride, and I think I may have lost 2-3 lbs just while changing out the tube. I was dripping buckets!!

    Then, two miles later, I had some random big black dog charge me in the woods, with the dog's owner running and screaming her head off 50 yards behind the dog. Luckily, the dog was friendly, so I escaped unharmed while it just tried to lick me to death -- yes, I lost the race, of course -- but it scared the living hell out of me, and I was again drenched in sweat and breathless from trying to outrun the damn dog on a climb!! The owner (a cute girl, no less ) apologized and made me laugh with "I don't know why... he just really likes bikes."

    Finally, one mile later, after reaching the end of the single-track and hopping on a fireroad, I simply felt like I was going to pass out -- not enough pre-hydration throughout the day, so I began to sweat less, which is always a bad sign (beginning stage of heat exhaustion). Doh!

    Needless to say, I took the hint and headed for home... this was definitely both my shortest AND toughest ride of the summer -- just 3.75 miles. But, I'll live to ride another day.

    Hopefully my morning rides on Sat and Sunday will turn out a little better than tonight.

    110 degrees... uhg ... it was nuts! lol

    Lesson of the day: Be smart folks, drink a lot of water all day and/or the night before... stay safe out there! Don't be an idiot (like me!), and always be sure to pay attention to what your body is telling you out there...

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by paleh0rse View Post
    I posted this story in my regional forum yesterday, but I figure it's worth sharing here as well for a few laughs and lessons re-learned...
    ----
    Holy hell!!! I went riding tonight at 6:30, and my thermometer still read 110deg! I got a rear pinch-flat (damnit!) five minutes into the ride, and I think I may have lost 2-3 lbs just while changing out the tube. I was dripping buckets!!

    Then, two miles later, I had some random big black dog charge me in the woods, with the dog's owner running and screaming her head off 50 yards behind the dog. Luckily, the dog was friendly, so I escaped unharmed while it just tried to lick me to death -- yes, I lost the race, of course -- but it scared the living hell out of me, and I was again drenched in sweat and breathless from trying to outrun the damn dog on a climb!! The owner (a cute girl, no less ) apologized and made me laugh with "I don't know why... he just really likes bikes."

    Finally, one mile later, after reaching the end of the single-track and hopping on a fireroad, I simply felt like I was going to pass out -- not enough pre-hydration throughout the day, so I began to sweat less, which is always a bad sign (beginning stage of heat exhaustion). Doh!

    Needless to say, I took the hint and headed for home... this was definitely both my shortest AND toughest ride of the summer -- just 3.75 miles. But, I'll live to ride another day.

    Hopefully my morning rides on Sat and Sunday will turn out a little better than tonight.

    110 degrees... uhg ... it was nuts! lol

    Lesson of the day: Be smart folks, drink a lot of water all day and/or the night before... stay safe out there! Don't be an idiot (like me!), and always be sure to pay attention to what your body is telling you out there...
    No dogs in mine, but I too had a sub-4 mile ride that killed me this summer. Hit the trail too late.

  28. #28
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    Looks like it gonna be pretty hot this weekend here
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Heat Index > Passion-untitled2.png  


  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by ep3w View Post
    Looks like it gonna be pretty hot this weekend here
    Good thing about living in triple digits land...I'll be posting one like that when you're in snow past your nuts for 3 months.

  30. #30
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    Haha, sorry for laughing but in central Florida we live and ride in this 100+ heat index for four months a year. Lots of water
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  31. #31
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    I have a weather station in my backyard and we clocked a heat index of 132 yesterday here in Charlotte, NC. 124 today.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by texacajun View Post
    Good thing about living in triple digits land...I'll be posting one like that when you're in snow past your nuts for 3 months.
    Personally, I would take cool riding in the summer and ripping powder in the backcountry all winter long over this heat and humidity any day.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by texacajun View Post
    Good thing about living in triple digits land...I'll be posting one like that when you're in snow past your nuts for 3 months.
    Nah, its Seattle. We get about 2 inches of snow a year. Get in the mountains and its a different story though.

  34. #34
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    two things that are good for leaving my bike inside the apartment: 128 degree index and studying for finals
    "Want to ride some more miles...?"

  35. #35
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
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    It was really sticky here today. 93* and 14% humidity.

  36. #36
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    Well, fellas, the good news is you can get use to it if it hangs around. Living in the desert (PHX) I have to acclimate every summer as the temps roll on, to where riding at 105 is normal. Last nights night ride started at 104 at 8pm. Humidity is probably lower than you east coaster/midwest folk have it, but with the monsoons, it gets up there some days. Bring the water (one for drinking and one for pouring on your head), bring the ice, and what saves my a$$ everyday in the sun - sun sleeves. An awesome invention. A little bandana over the neck helps too, but most of you probably have trees that provide shade - saguaro provide very little. However a heat index of 130 - F that!
    Today's the day I eat bikes.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dag Nabbit View Post
    Well, fellas, the good news is you can get use to it if it hangs around. Living in the desert (PHX) I have to acclimate every summer as the temps roll on, to where riding at 105 is normal. Last nights night ride started at 104 at 8pm. Humidity is probably lower than you east coaster/midwest folk have it, but with the monsoons, it gets up there some days. Bring the water (one for drinking and one for pouring on your head), bring the ice, and what saves my a$$ everyday in the sun - sun sleeves. An awesome invention. A little bandana over the neck helps too, but most of you probably have trees that provide shade - saguaro provide very little. However a heat index of 130 - F that!
    Probably? Phoenix is likely among the top 5 most arid cities in the U.S.
    Shade doesn't help near as much when humidity is nearing 100%. Pouring water over your head just makes you feel wetter in those conditions. A swamp cooler salesman would die destitute in a geographic location where humid conditions are the norm.

    But I agree that the southwest desert can be brutally hot, and dangerous, without planning and common sense.

  38. #38
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    I was thinking about hitting the trails for a short ride tomorrow evening once it starts to cool down. The heat index has been 105 – 110 all week so far with humidity around 80 – 90%, but tomorrow the high is only suppose to be 93! I just hope the mosquitoes don’t have me for dinner! We’ll see what tomorrow brings.

  39. #39
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    Jersey heat = 117 today. Balls hot = no riding. Sucks, I'm feeling everyone's pain on this thread. California here we come.

  40. #40
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    the key to riding in heat and humidity is HYDRATION. Get yourself properly hydrated before you ride and you'll be OK. Well, at least for the short rides I do. You guys with 10-15-20++ mile rides scare me.

  41. #41
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    The heat isn't a big deal if you're drinking enough water throughout the day. You can't just drink a ton of water right before a ride and expect to be okay. Cmon guys, as cyclists, you are athletes, and should be consuming plenty of water everyday, enough to maintain hydration.

    And obviously you'll want to take water with you on your rides as well, along with some electrolytes on extended rides and in higher temps.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by BumpityBump View Post
    Probably? Phoenix is likely among the top 5 most arid cities in the U.S.
    Shade doesn't help near as much when humidity is nearing 100%. Pouring water over your head just makes you feel wetter in those conditions. A swamp cooler salesman would die destitute in a geographic location where humid conditions are the norm.

    But I agree that the southwest desert can be brutally hot, and dangerous, without planning and common sense.
    Ok, it IS higher. Been a while since I lived in the midwest, and have since pushed 90% humidity days out of my memory banks. But hey, we'll get up to a big 30-40% after a big rain! Wowzers! Man, I sure don't miss that pea soup.
    Today's the day I eat bikes.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dag Nabbit View Post
    Wowzers! Man, I sure don't miss that pea soup.
    I hear that, and am leaving it very soon myself to get back to my mountainous roots. It does lead to some incredible biological diversity however.

  44. #44
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    @bingemtbr that makes good sense but I wonder if laying down and putting that ice on your neck (jugular vein) would work even better. More blood flow. This is serious business, I was riding in high 90s last week and every time I stopped (no air movement) I started to overheat. A mechanical or injury could have been very bad news.
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  45. #45
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    IMHO, it's better to get up uber-early and ride in the morning than ride in the evenings when it's this hot. In the morning the rocks, dirt, trail whatever has had all night to cool off. In the evenings all that stuff is acting as a radiator and is still throwing off heat on you.

    Unfortunately I'm not a morning person. Not by a long shot.

  46. #46
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    Cause "pics or it didn't happen" rules the web.
    Photo taken Thursday. It's blurry but that say heat index under that painfully big number
    Heat Index > Passion-284244_115108175251341_100002564771984_115515_156984_n.jpg

  47. #47
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    I rode around mid-day on Monday and Wednesday. I drank 70oz of water in about 10 miles. Rode 12-13 miles yesterday and today early morning and late afternoon and was able to make it with water to spare. It wasn't as bad as I thought it would be but one definitely must be conscious of how much water would be needed in order to stay hydrated. It's not impossible and once you're in the woods and out of the sun, well, it is still hot but bearable.

    Don't forget your electrolytes!

  48. #48
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    Here in upstate new york heat index of 105 to 110 is pretty damn hot for us yanks, we don't have a season long enough to really acclimate to it like you southerners. A west point cadet died yesterday from the heat, a young kid in good physical shape, and every year I read these stories. I work outside all day in this stuff, and maybe I'm getting older or wiser I'm not sure, but I'll wait until tomorrow when it cools off a little. Not riding is killing me though.

  49. #49
    turtles make me hot
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    I got up early this morning and rode about 9 miles. It was 88 degrees when I got to the trailhead and 91 when I got back. Had my Camelbak loaded with ice and had on a single wicking layer. Didn't do too bad.
    I like turtles

  50. #50
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    I did go riding this evening. It was still 95 out with an index of 102 but humidity was only about 55%. Once I got onto the trails and under the tree cover it wasn’t that bad and had a good ride, except that the bugs were out of control!

  51. #51
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    I've been riding on 100f+ actual temp days since april. In east texas, i've found I prefer riding right around sundown. Actual temps are higher but no direct sun is a big bonus and the humidity hasn't crept back up. At sunrise it's cooler but the humidity is MUCH higher and riding is less comfortable. I reched this conclusion after experimenting my first summer down here.

    I much prefer a snowy winter over april-sept 100+ days

  52. #52
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    I didn't ride today with the heat index way above 100...
    I went to the trails and did about 3 hours of trail maintenance
    Noxubee Hills Trail System's FB page
    http://www.facebook.com/pages/Noxube...8499244?v=wall

  53. #53
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    Rode last Thursday morning for about 45 minutes. I hydrated well the day before, drank a lot of fluid preride and during and still dropped 5 pounds
    No moss...

  54. #54
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    I haven't taken my bike out to the trails in a couple of weeks now, thanks to the heat. Still commute, though. Thankfully all my stops are within about 5 minutes ride of me.

    Lows in the mid-70's, highs at the low-mid-90's, 70% humidity at the minimum this coming week.

  55. #55
    turtles make me hot
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    While riding in the heat this morning, I ran into a group of friends and stopped to say hi. I noticed one guy in the group who's gotta be 300 pounds. He walks up hills and stuff, but he's out doin' it. He was totally covered in a sweatshirt, sweat pants and armor. I asked why on earth he would ride like that today expecting him to say some crap like I'm tryin' to sweat more or lose weight. He replied so he doesn't get poison ivy. I damn near passed out.
    I like turtles

  56. #56
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    club ride this morning at 9:30 am. ~ 30 people -- can't believe how many people turn up and ride in this heat. We have chilled water melon, cantaloupe, grapes and ice water for everyone after the ride. Finished up around 11:30 and it was starting to feel 100ish. Lots of shade on the trails is a life saver.
    Plus, we keep a close eye on every one in our group to see if anyone is starting to wilt. I rode with the "relaxed" group this morning -- frequent stops in shady spots after each loop are the order of the day and make the ride bearable and fun.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by PretendGentleman View Post
    if you ride in the heat, listen to your body, and make sure you drink cold water.

    the cold water thing I never followed in the past, but it definitely helps keep you cool. I put at least a tray of ice cubes in my camelback before riding.
    Actually, drinking cold water forces the body to spend energy to warm it up to body temperature thus making you hotter in the long run and more tired. Sure it feels better cold, but the science would say drink water closer to room temp to stay cool.

  58. #58
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    Friday in Upstate New York it was 112° with the Heat Index ... I could have drank the Sky it was so saturated with Water ...

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by bingemtbr View Post
    We rode in the suck at 5:30pm, 105F + the heat index. One rider starts getting light headed, 5 min's later nausea and headache. Uh oh. I happen to be packing ice with water in my Camelback. My buddy who's a Marine knew this and bummed a few ice cubes. He placed the ice on the underside (soft part) of the wrist of the rider who (apparently) was experiencing heat stroke. 5 min's later...good to go. Headed straight out to the cars (6 miles) but was much shorter than the anticipated 14 mile ride. Better safe than sorry.

    This was the first time I've seen that trick. According to the Marine, this is a fairly common way to cool down in the "sand box". Just make sure the ice goes direct to the skin and your wrist is facing up with ice on top.

    Lucky I had ice in my Camelpack. Ice cold water in these temp's ROCKS!!!!
    It was actually the first stages of "heat exhaustion," not heat stroke. It's still pretty serious, but not nearly as bad as heat stroke, which can be fatal. Be glad your marine buddy was there, though! That trick is crucial for those of us in the military -- we're forced to use it way too frequently! lol

  60. #60
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    Went out this morning to try and beat the heat. At 7am the dew was so heavy I was slipping and sliding in all the grassy spots. Plus it sucked getting up super early to get out there. Of course this evening it cooled down a bunch and seemed nicer than the morning.
    I might have to re-think that early AM theory of mine.

  61. #61
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    Personally I like the heat, but it can be a killer. It is all relative though. I spent a little time in a place called Port Hedland. Hot, a lot. The first day under 38 C (100F) and not heat index, just shade temp was the third week of May (read November in the N hemisphere). It was second week of June before there were 3 such days in a row. The coldest day of the year was 27C and there were 5 of them. Average over the 2 coldest months - 31C. The riding is all on red sand and while there are some trees, most of the area's features are lower than an ant mound. I can't remember how much water I drank while riding, but it averaged 4-5 litres for a round of golf (plus the same in beer). You can get used to it.

    Oddly, the worst heat experience I have seen was in New Zealand, South Island and a long time ago. A mate and I were touring on our MTBs and had just arrived the evening before. It was really warm at the airport - quite unexpected. Next morning off we went out of Christchurch up the gorge. 103km to our free camp site. Official temp was 39C. Who knows what the road temp was - maybe 45+. We ran out of water and my mate started to wander all over the road and slur. I put him under a hedge and rode off to find a farmer and beg for some water. He came good but it was an hour or so. We still had about 30k to go at that stage and all into a strong and hot headwind. It stayed above 35C all night. That must be as rare as rocking horse **** in NZ. At 8.45AM, 5 min before we left a cold southwest change blew in. Temp went down to 12C in a few minutes and stayed that way with continuous rain and blowing wind all day. 98km and guess what direction after the river crossing - yep south wet , sorry west. Typical. Yes we were in NZ and on our last day there found out it had been the coldest March for 32 years and the windiest for >50. Perfect.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ridnparadise View Post
    Personally I like the heat, but it can be a killer. It is all relative though. I spent a little time in a place called Port Hedland. Hot, a lot. The first day under 38 C (100F) and not heat index, just shade temp was the third week of May (read November in the N hemisphere). It was second week of June before there were 3 such days in a row. The coldest day of the year was 27C and there were 5 of them. Average over the 2 coldest months - 31C. The riding is all on red sand and while there are some trees, most of the area's features are lower than an ant mound. I can't remember how much water I drank while riding, but it averaged 4-5 litres for a round of golf (plus the same in beer). You can get used to it.

    Oddly, the worst heat experience I have seen was in New Zealand, South Island and a long time ago. A mate and I were touring on our MTBs and had just arrived the evening before. It was really warm at the airport - quite unexpected. Next morning off we went out of Christchurch up the gorge. 103km to our free camp site. Official temp was 39C. Who knows what the road temp was - maybe 45+. We ran out of water and my mate started to wander all over the road and slur. I put him under a hedge and rode off to find a farmer and beg for some water. He came good but it was an hour or so. We still had about 30k to go at that stage and all into a strong and hot headwind. It stayed above 35C all night. That must be as rare as rocking horse **** in NZ. At 8.45AM, 5 min before we left a cold southwest change blew in. Temp went down to 12C in a few minutes and stayed that way with continuous rain and blowing wind all day. 98km and guess what direction after the river crossing - yep south wet , sorry west. Typical. Yes we were in NZ and on our last day there found out it had been the coldest March for 32 years and the windiest for >50. Perfect.
    That is way too many numbers for one post.

  63. #63
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    Hey, guise, did you hear the latest news that in the night temperatures go down and the sun is not burning your skin?

    That's right, invest in a pair of these:

    http://www.dealextreme.com/p/ha-iii-...ight-set-25149

    (or some other MagicShine products because they are really good and cost only a fraction of those big brand lamps)

    Put one on your helmet, and one on your bar, and ride the night.

    Night rides returned my passion during hard-core summer time. They are awesome. There are no people on trails (hikers, other bikers), temperature is awesome cause in the forest during the night it gets really colder, there are animals around (I had to pedal fast a few times ...) and overall - it's just great.
    Daemon
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  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by bgraves28 View Post
    Actually, drinking cold water forces the body to spend energy to warm it up to body temperature thus making you hotter in the long run and more tired. Sure it feels better cold, but the science would say drink water closer to room temp to stay cool.
    I've heard this before, and while I think it might hold true under rest conditions, I think that it is definitely not the case when your body temperature is high and your body is trying to cool off.

    consider this example, when football teams win the game, they poor a cooler full of ice water on the coach, not room-temp water, and I don't think that football teams provide their players with ice-cold water in order to help boost their metabolism. College football trainers are generally up-to-date on their sports science, and I would be surprised if they're all engaging in a practice that hurts performance.

    The only challenge to drinking cold water while exercising that I am aware of scientific evidence supporting is based on the idea that cold water slows down peristalsis, i.e. the opening of your pyloric valve. The consequence could be an upset stomach because the water sits too long. Similar reasoning motivates the recommendation to drink your water in gulps rather than sips. The gulp of water better induces peristalsis and the water gets into your duodenum faster and is absorbed more quickly into your blood stream.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by bgraves28 View Post
    spend energy to warm it up
    Spending energy to warm something up means cooling the warm part down.

    If you have a hot metal cube, and place an ice cold metal cube next to it (so they touch) the hot one will spend it's energy to warm the cold one. Thus making the hot one - colder.

    Take into account that your body is mostly water anyways.

    Drinking cold (cold, not icy) water cools your body core temperature down and helps perspiration which then further chills you.
    Daemon
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  66. #66
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    Without reading the whole thread, I say bring it on! I'll ride in this than 20 or teen temps anyday. Pack the Camelbak full of ice, fill it up and I'm good to go. I ride farther and better in this than winter. Feel better too. Winter and snow will be here soon nuff and people will be complaining it's too cold. I saw enjoy it while you can.

  67. #67
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    Thankfully, the heat and humidity broke last Thursday here but I did ride in the 100+ heat index weather we had last week.

    I use the "big ice" method texacajun talked about but I use old yogurt containers (Chobani brand because they're a bit larger). Four of those large ice "cubes" and fill the rest with refrigerated water and I'm good to go water wise. The chilled water lasts about 3 hours, which is about how long the water lasts. I also bring a source of electrolytes. I'm a big fan of the clif shot bloks.

    During the high heat index, I rode mostly early in the morning on trails. The green trail that was in full sun was "harder" than the blue/black trails in the woods.
    During the last 30 minutes of sunlight, I would screw around in the backyard. Skinnies, log piles, and trackstands were the order of the "day" then. It was a good way to improve skills while being able to ride without having to worry too much about the heat.

  68. #68
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    Central Texas stats

    Hah, no respite in Central Texas until probably October.
    Ride Like a Girl is tonight at 5:30, around 30 women will show to ride trails, and it will be around 103 degrees when we start.

  69. #69
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    KY pretty hot right now. 100-110 heat index. It makes me miss the summer.

    Rode SCAT yesterday (hydrated lots before and drank plenty during) and went around in a good time but 3/4 of the way through a 2 hour ride my judgement on downhill sections was slowing down considerably. i had to go down slopes pretty slowly as I was going to end up getting hurt.

    By the time I had got home I was suffering from nausea, cramps etc.

    Be careful out there.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by keene1 View Post
    ky pretty hot right now. 100-110 heat index. It makes me miss the summer.

    Rode scat yesterday (hydrated lots before and drank plenty during) and went around in a good time but 3/4 of the way through a 2 hour ride my judgement on downhill sections was slowing down considerably. I had to go down slopes pretty slowly as i was going to end up getting hurt.

    By the time i had got home i was suffering from nausea, cramps etc.

    Be careful out there.
    makes me miss winter i mean!

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by June Bug View Post
    Hah, no respite in Central Texas until probably October.
    Ride Like a Girl is tonight at 5:30, around 30 women will show to ride trails, and it will be around 103 degrees when we start.
    Same thing here in Houston. It's gonna be nice and hot throug September.

    We've been at or over over 100 nearly every day since the start of June and the humidity is as bad as it gets. We just generally try to be on the trails by 7am and finish up before 10am. Obviously we're drinking a ton over that time frame, but at least it's bearable.

    I did ~20.5 miles yesterday up at Double Lakes in Coldspring, TX and an hour after we called it quits I was ready to go again!

    Now last weekend, I did the Katy Flatlands Century road ride and that was a bear. Five hours on the bike in the TX heat on roads without any shade make for a tough day!

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by keene1 View Post
    KY pretty hot right now. 100-110 heat index. It makes me miss the summer.

    Rode SCAT yesterday (hydrated lots before and drank plenty during) and went around in a good time but 3/4 of the way through a 2 hour ride my judgement on downhill sections was slowing down considerably. i had to go down slopes pretty slowly as I was going to end up getting hurt.

    By the time I had got home I was suffering from nausea, cramps etc.

    Be careful out there.
    There's a set of trails called "scat" in Kentucky? That's just rather... unfortunate.

    lol

  73. #73
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    Was riding to visit my girl at work, about a 13mi. round trip on gravel/road. When I got there I felt sick...checked my phone and lol'd.

  74. #74
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    This is four months a year heat in florida. Every freaking day. I hate it and i have been here thirty years. I am so envious of you guys who have real hills and only have to deal with this stuff briefly. Time for a road trip to the mountains!

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    On Tuesday the 19th I rode white tanks and the high temp of that ride was 122 degrees with and average temp of 116.3 degrees including the thermometer warm up from about 90 degrees being in an air conditioned car. That ride hurt me and was about 10 minutes slower than usual, but I ride 5 days a week mostly above 100 degrees. It is what it is, and I listen to my body and only drink water and gatorade daily. I have had to cut rides short before, but mostly I can make it just fine in the heat. Be careful out there, as being unprepared can really "F" you up
    Tie two birds together and though they have four wings, they cannot fly!

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by BumpityBump View Post
    That is way too many numbers for one post.
    We have a relative new winner - tsefreeflow - 7 numbers in 5 lines versus me with 20 in 17 lines.

    1292349823-59872835-8632-56206506175-9328=0151-89476571=

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daemon[CRO] View Post
    Spending energy to warm something up means cooling the warm part down.

    If you have a hot metal cube, and place an ice cold metal cube next to it (so they touch) the hot one will spend it's energy to warm the cold one. Thus making the hot one - colder.

    Take into account that your body is mostly water anyways.

    Drinking cold (cold, not icy) water cools your body core temperature down and helps perspiration which then further chills you.
    The only thing that helps perspiration is more liquid, regardless of the temperature of that liquid. And when energy is burned, heat is created...energy is heat.

  78. #78
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    Last week I had 3 days of riding in a row at over 100 and way humid.

    Considering the multi-feet of snow and blistering winter winds, a little bit of heat ain't stopping me from riding in the summer.

    A little slower ride and extra water is all.

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by GatorB View Post
    Haha, sorry for laughing but in central Florida we live and ride in this 100+ heat index for four months a year. Lots of water
    Agreed...

    I usually fill my water bladder with 1/3rd of water and put it into freezer the night before.
    The next day I fill it with water and go out... Nice cold water for most of your ride.

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by CBRsteve View Post
    I did ~20.5 miles yesterday up at Double Lakes in Coldspring, TX and an hour after we called it quits I was ready to go again!

    Now last weekend, I did the Katy Flatlands Century road ride and that was a bear. Five hours on the bike in the TX heat on roads without any shade make for a tough day!
    Gah! My husband did a geezer road race (26 mi) out in Katy in June, and it was hot then. Cannot image 100 miles of Katy. Hope you at least had a tail wind part of the time, or maybe a headwind would be cooler. Blast furnace either way!

    20 miles of Lake Lake is how many laps? I know there is some elevation change on that course since there is a little bit of downhill, but you never really climb and it is endlessly twisty, so it always feels a little like a Möbius strip -- always intriguing and fun, but you gotta stay focused with the constant turns.

    Good for you on the recharge! What's your magic potion? I like Nuuns diluted and some Clif Bloks seem good for the warmer weather. PayDay candy bar also. Skanky ingredients (grease, peanuts, high fructose corn syrup & salt) but nothing, NOTHING tastes better and it will always get you through the last 5 miles of any ride, road or mountain.

  81. #81
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    I did a couple of rides last week when it was 95-100F and high humidity. I always put a frozen cooler stick (reusable plastic cooler thing for waterbottles) in my camelbak and fill it with water from the fridge, which helps a great deal. Still get through 2l in 10 miles or so and feel like a wet rag at the end of it.

    Main problem I have is with the thermal protection tripping in my lights. Still, when I'm riding in the snow with heatpacks in my gloves and boots, I'll look back fondly on dealing with being too hot

  82. #82
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    Living in GA, 90 plus is pretty standard stuff. Really depends on the trail and if any breeze is present. I've ridden some places that feel like a sauna and in other places where 97 really didn't seem bad at all. I've acclimated to the point that less than 80 is too cold for me. 85 is probably 'just right'.

  83. #83
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    Another thing is to ensure you prehydrate before you ride.

    What I have done with my camelback is I fill it up with ice as much as I can put in it then I fill it with cold water.. I have a camelback pouch in my backpack that I put it in and it sits in the truck the entire day. I have done that at 7am and when I get to the trailhead at 7pm after work the thing is still over 1/2 full of ice.
    I don't use Strava. Don't need an application to tell me I am slow because I already know.

  84. #84
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    I live in Louisiana and ride every day...usually in the early afternoon which is the hottest part of the day. I ride in cargo pants, too, because of bugs and sharp objects. I have never had a problem with heat exhaustion. I drink a large Sonic Diet Cherry Limeade before I start and I stop every four miles and drink a full water bottle whether I'm thirsty or not. I ride between ten and fifteen miles a day on some intermediate level trails.

    Staying well hydrated goes a long way to making hot weather riding enjoyable. Plus we ride in the shade most of the time. The key is to drink before you get thirsty and to tank up instead of sipping.

    I have three water bottle mounts on my bikes. Don't like wearing a pack.

    Folks, if we let weather deter us we'd never ride. It's always too hot or too cold or too wet or too rainy or too this or too that.

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    Im in Oklahoma, went for a short 6 mile ride yesterday. Started the ride at about 6pm and it was 104. By the time the ride was over about 7pm the tempature had dropped to 103. Just something you have to deal with. Oh yeah, ordered the Camelbak Mule 100 oz. today, 30 more oz. will probably help on the longer rides.

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by June Bug View Post
    Gah! My husband did a geezer road race (26 mi) out in Katy in June, and it was hot then. Cannot image 100 miles of Katy. Hope you at least had a tail wind part of the time, or maybe a headwind would be cooler. Blast furnace either way!

    20 miles of Lake Lake is how many laps? I know there is some elevation change on that course since there is a little bit of downhill, but you never really climb and it is endlessly twisty, so it always feels a little like a Möbius strip -- always intriguing and fun, but you gotta stay focused with the constant turns.

    Good for you on the recharge! What's your magic potion? I like Nuuns diluted and some Clif Bloks seem good for the warmer weather. PayDay candy bar also. Skanky ingredients (grease, peanuts, high fructose corn syrup & salt) but nothing, NOTHING tastes better and it will always get you through the last 5 miles of any ride, road or mountain.
    The race loop at Double Lakes was about 12.5 miles this year, but we only included part of that during our ride. Since the new mileage was added late last year, there is a great selection of trails available. There are some uphills, but nothing too severe or too steep... just sort of long rolling uphills. I wish the trails were a bit more technical (some drops or rock gardens) but they are a blast nonetheless.

    Recharge? Nothing too special really, I try to eat three Bloks about every hour and drink LOTS of water/gatorade mix. After the ride I also eat a granola bar and banana. The PayDay isn't a bad idea... I may have to give that a shot!

  87. #87
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    Complaining about something you can't change is pointless.

  88. #88
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    Went through alot of liquid yesterday.

    Prehydrated before the ride. Got on the bike at 4:30 with an ice/water filled 100 oz camelback.

    Rode from 4:30 to about 7:30 (moderate pace) and drank all 100 ounces by the end.

    Went home and downed 16 oz of chocolate milk then a 32 oz Gatorade.

    Finally after all that liquid I had a tiny little wizz. Amazing how much liquid I went through.

  89. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by uzisuicide View Post
    Complaining about something you can't change is pointless.
    As is stating the obvious!
    Tie two birds together and though they have four wings, they cannot fly!

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toff View Post
    Went through alot of liquid yesterday.

    Prehydrated before the ride. Got on the bike at 4:30 with an ice/water filled 100 oz camelback.

    Rode from 4:30 to about 7:30 (moderate pace) and drank all 100 ounces by the end.

    Went home and downed 16 oz of chocolate milk then a 32 oz Gatorade.

    Finally after all that liquid I had a tiny little wizz. Amazing how much liquid I went through.
    I agree, I drink like a dogone camel and notice I hardly ever have to take a wizz while riding or even afterwards. My shirt looks and feels like I just came out of jumping in a lake and my eyes are stinging from the sweat shower on my head, especially after I take off my helmet!
    I don't use Strava. Don't need an application to tell me I am slow because I already know.

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