Results 1 to 84 of 84
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pow77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    214

    Great mountain biking and skiing locations?

    So I have read through the thread Best place to live and mountain bike???? and was hoping to add skiing and snowboarding into the mix without hijacking the tread I thought I would start a new one.
    So where are the great locations to live, mountain bike and ski/snowboard?
    I am hoping to spend a year somewhere different where I can do some riding and snowboarding.
    Any ideas?
    Last edited by pow77; 05-08-2013 at 03:30 AM.
    'keep the mission alive!'

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,048

    Great mounatin biking and sking locations?

    Durango

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pow77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    214
    I have heard great things about Durango. Whats the snow like?
    I forgot to mention Im from Australia, nowhere near the mountains. But have visited Canada, Japan, Colorado (Summit county) and New England. We are thinking somewhere in the USA as we can get a 1 year visa.
    'keep the mission alive!'

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    44
    Tahoe

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: eugalc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    168
    I would think Winter Park Colorado would rank pretty high for both. I haven't mountain biked Durango, only been there once in the winter, but it's a pretty sweet town. Bozeman Montana also probably ranks pretty high, but probably had too short of a mountain bike season- it stays cold there for a while.

  6. #6
    Self Inflicted
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    65
    If i were you Id go where the skiing is good. any area that has good mtns for skiing undoubtedly has good mtn biking as well.

    The three I would pick are
    summit county colorado
    Park city ut
    lake tahoe ca

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pow77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    214
    I would love to check out Tahoe, Its definitely on the list. My girlfriend really wants to check out San Fransisco so thats also on the list. I know its not close to the mountains but she really likes the idea of spending some time in a city, as we are from a small coastal surf town. (Byron Bay if you want to know). Thanks for the ideas guys.
    'keep the mission alive!'

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MSU Alum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,940
    I lived in Bozeman for 6 years; the summers are very nice, the town is great. The mountain biking is a bit limited. The mountain biking season is pretty similar to the higher elevations of Utah and Colorado. I think the skiing is consistently better in the mountains around Salt Lake City, and the Park City, Utah area has over 300 miles of singletrack. 30 miles from an international airport with 7 or 8 major ski areas within 45 minutes of that airport...pretty hard to beat. But, gotta go to the liquor store for real beer, wine and booze.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pow77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    214
    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    But, gotta go to the liquor store for real beer, wine and booze.
    Ha ha in Australia the liquor store is the only place you can get booze!
    Will look into Bozeman and Park City. Thanks
    I have also just completing a degree in Environmental Science so would love to get some experience in that field (maybe an internship) and even do some trail work volunteering as a way to learn more about trail building and design, as its much more limited down here.
    But also keen to hear on any places that just rock in general anywhere in the world!
    Very keen to check out NZ?
    Last edited by pow77; 05-03-2013 at 07:37 PM.
    'keep the mission alive!'

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MSU Alum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,940
    I have to get to NZ someday!

  11. #11
    LMN
    LMN is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    4,658
    Revelstoke BC.

    Skiing: Arguably the best ski hill in North America. And with out a doubt the best ski touring.

    Mountain bike: Huge trail net work; everything from incredible XC to massive DH trails. The ride community is top notch.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  12. #12
    tg
    tg is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,453
    Eagle county Colorado....Vail / Beaver Creek and gobs of singletrack. We have a long mtb season for the mountains and some of the best skiing in Colorado.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pow77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    214
    Hmmm So many amazing places coming up. Always wanted to check Revelstoke out for the snow but didnt realize it has great mountain biking also.
    Visited Vail/Beaver in winter and really liked the snowboarding. Gobs of single track you say
    'keep the mission alive!'

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MSU Alum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,940
    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    Revelstoke BC.

    Skiing: Arguably the best ski hill in North America. And with out a doubt the best ski touring.

    Mountain bike: Huge trail net work; everything from incredible XC to massive DH trails. The ride community is top notch.
    On my way!

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by pow77 View Post
    I would love to check out Tahoe, Its definitely on the list. My girlfriend really wants to check out San Fransisco so thats also on the list. I know its not close to the mountains but she really likes the idea of spending some time in a city, as we are from a small coastal surf town. (Byron Bay if you want to know). Thanks for the ideas guys.

    Tahoe is absolutely awesome for both mtb and skiing. The bay area is only about 4 hours away, and there are awesome trails on the nevada side of the lake also, so if you go, check it all out.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,048

    Great mounatin biking and sking locations?

    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    Revelstoke BC.

    Skiing: Arguably the best ski hill in North America. And with out a doubt the best ski touring.

    Mountain bike: Huge trail net work; everything from incredible XC to massive DH trails. The ride community is top notch.
    Wow. That place is gorgeous. If u find a job or don't need to work looks like a nice place

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,075
    I have lived in both Colorado and in the Bay Area of California. In my opinion, the skiing and mountain biking are way better in Colorado. In Colorado the snow is fluffier and it never rains during ski season. There is a vastly greater number of mountain bike trails in Colorado and you also have desert riding in Fruita and across the state line in Moab. San Francisco is a world class city and California has it's own charms, but if we are talking mountain biking and skiing, then there is no question at all - Colorado wins. (Another consideration might be the cost of living. Mountain towns are notoriously expensive, but if you lived in the Denver area it would be a lot cheaper than anywhere in California. You would have access to a lot of good trails and skiing would only be 1 1/2 hours away).

  18. #18
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    26,411
    Quote Originally Posted by pow77 View Post
    I have heard great things about Durango. Whats the snow like?
    I forgot to mention Im from Australia, nowhere near the mountains. But have visited Canada, Japan, Colorado (Summit county) and New England. We are thinking somewhere in the USA as we can get a 1 year visa.
    Durango is kind of far from a lot of skiing options. Sure, there's Durango Resort up the road, and Wolf Creek has very consistent light powder, most powder days in CO, high base and usually the most snow, but it has very little vertical. No mega-resorts within good distance of Durango. You can drive for a while to get to Telluride maybe, but it's not close at all. I'd think there are better locations within Colorado, like Gunnison and a few others, that have access to more/bigger resorts with more choices, etc. The biking is supposed to be fantastic (I've only skied out of Durango), but it's like that in many places over Colorado, so I wouldn't worry much there.

    I'd definitely say Colorado is one of your top choices, along with Jackson Hole, WY if you are at all into gravity riding, Tahoe is ok, but very dry and sandy at times in the summer. The benefit in Tahoe is being within a reasonable driving distance to the coast and you get more ski resorts. The snow quality sucks though. The rockies often get more summer-time moisture too. Utah might be worth a look too, absolutely excellent snow quality, good vertical and a good amount of resorts to choose from. This if you can stand living in a Mormon state.

    Just a note, I did most of my skiing in California, at pretty much every Tahoe resort. The snow was usually wet and heavy, aka: Sierra Cement. When it's snowing, it's usually just barely below freezing. It's nice for the mild temps, but the snow quality was usually poor. On extremely steep chutes, it was easier to turn, but any milder slope and you'd get bogged down way too much. Modern fat powder skis did fix this to a large extent, but I also got the opportunity in the last few years to ride (ski and snowboard) some large dumps of snow in AZ at the ski resort in Flagstaff, several foot dumps. That was my fist experience with light dry powder, before going to Colorado. The snow really was that much better and amazing compared to what fell in CA. It was kind of a "everything you hoped for and more" situation, which was a nice change. No longer did I have to be on a super steep slope to turn decently, it was just like riding through "smoke" as described. If I had my choice, I'd choose light and dry powder like Utah, Colorado and to a smaller exstent NM and AZ are famous for. Supposedly this also exists in California somewhere up above 11,000' when you are doing ski-touring, but so few people have the time and money to access it, so it ends up being the resorts for most people. Tahoe tops out around 10,000', and to get significantly higher, you have to head south in the Sierras. Here in Alaska we usually get heavy cement at low altitude, as it's usually just near freezing like in the Sierras. The difference is we are at sea level though! Since we have lots of vertical, we do have drier powder up higher, but that creates it's own set of problems with radically differing snow conditions on the same mountain. Anyways, California resorts are fun with some of the steepest chutes around, but for me the decision would come down to "better powder/skiing and being land-locked" vs "more big resorts in a smaller geographical area and access to the coast".
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  19. #19
    Mtn Biker Machinist
    Reputation: 1 cog frog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    957
    Utah, hands down. With Moab, St. George, Virgin, and the Ogden/Salt Lake City/Park City area, plus the "Greatest Snow on Earth" in one state, you can't go wrong!

  20. #20
    North Van/Whistler
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,614
    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    Revelstoke BC.

    Skiing: Arguably the best ski hill in North America. And with out a doubt the best ski touring.

    Mountain bike: Huge trail net work; everything from incredible XC to massive DH trails. The ride community is top notch.
    Only downside is the long shoulder season. With Whistler you have Pemberton down the road to take the edge of shoulder season for biking.

    All other places mention here suck ass comparatively speaking including the places in Utah, Co, Montana
    Locals' Guide to North Shore Rides http://mtbtrails.ca/

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    453
    I agree with Utah. What about Frisco, CO? Tons of skiing within 20 to 30 minutes as well as mountain biking. Fruita is not too far away and weekend trips into Utah are not at all out of the question.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pow77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    214
    Quote Originally Posted by Thor29 View Post
    I have lived in both Colorado and in the Bay Area of California. In my opinion, the skiing and mountain biking are way better in Colorado. In Colorado the snow is fluffier and it never rains during ski season. There is a vastly greater number of mountain bike trails in Colorado and you also have desert riding in Fruita and across the state line in Moab. San Francisco is a world class city and California has it's own charms, but if we are talking mountain biking and skiing, then there is no question at all - Colorado wins. (Another consideration might be the cost of living. Mountain towns are notoriously expensive, but if you lived in the Denver area it would be a lot cheaper than anywhere in California. You would have access to a lot of good trails and skiing would only be 1 1/2 hours away).
    Thanks Thor, what about Boulder? Or is just as expensive as the resort areas? I drove through Denver but really didnt check it out. If you had the chance to spend a year somewhere new would you chose the Denver area or the bay area? Seems like there is lots to do around both?
    'keep the mission alive!'

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pow77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    214
    Quote Originally Posted by scmtbiker View Post
    I agree with Utah. What about Frisco, CO? Tons of skiing within 20 to 30 minutes as well as mountain biking. Fruita is not too far away and weekend trips into Utah are not at all out of the question.
    I actually spent 6 weeks In Frisco in winter and loved it. We really liked how friendly the people were there, but think we will check out somewhere different. We are looking for something different from our small town. Somewhere that is near trails and snow but also has exciting other stuff. San Fransisco sounds like it would be great but is it too far from good trails and Tahoe?
    Looks like I have to do a bit more research as there are to many awesome places.
    'keep the mission alive!'

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: donthucktoflat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    26

    Re: Great mounatin biking and sking locations?

    Colorado = legal weed, skiing and mtb.


    As if there's a question

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pow77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    214
    I dont want this thread to really be about my possible destination but more a list of awesome bike and ski/snowboard destinations.
    Some places I would love to be able to spend some time in would be
    Bend, Whistler, Nelson/Rossland, Revelstoke, Park City, Tahoe, Wanaka/Queenstown (NZ) and Crested Butte.
    What do you think makes areas like these so great. I have grown up on the beach and surfed my whole life. The mountains, sweet single track and snow is calling!
    'keep the mission alive!'

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pow77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    214
    Quote Originally Posted by donthucktoflat View Post
    Colorado = legal weed, skiing and mtb.


    As if there's a question
    Yeah forgot about that part.
    'keep the mission alive!'

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: donthucktoflat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    26

    Re: Great mounatin biking and sking locations?

    Quote Originally Posted by pow77 View Post
    Yeah forgot about that part.
    It got bumped up on my list

  28. #28
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    26,411
    Quote Originally Posted by pow77 View Post
    I actually spent 6 weeks In Frisco in winter and loved it. We really liked how friendly the people were there, but think we will check out somewhere different. We are looking for something different from our small town. Somewhere that is near trails and snow but also has exciting other stuff. San Fransisco sounds like it would be great but is it too far from good trails and Tahoe?
    Looks like I have to do a bit more research as there are to many awesome places.
    People do go to Tahoe from the Bay Area in droves, the Bay Area has some great MTB trails, but I'd rather visit than live there, as it can be a nightmare logistically. Realize that it's a huge metro area, a trip to a resort in Tahoe is around 4hrs or so. It's a mass-exodus/mass-return every day of the weekend. Part of the aspect is just getting out of the Bay Area, and then any slow downs in Sacramento or up near Auburn/Placerville, and it just becomes difficult to justify 8hrs on the road each weekend. As a local, we always knew to expect the freeways were jammed with "tahoe/bay area" traffic, and much of the time through Auburn and Placerville they are (the main corridors to Tahoe). Sacramento at least has some benefits of both, and even better is probably around Folsom/Auburn, those are still close to the urban area of Sacramento, yet removed enough with local trails you can either hit those or head up to the Sierras.

    The Bay Area is similar to Phoenix. Most people that live in Phoenix ride in around Phoenix because it has an outstanding city-park system with trails in various parks within the valley. Even though the heat is absolutely brutal in the summer, most people will still stick it out and ride around Phoenix, occasionally escaping to the high country (2hrs away). The Bay Area also has an impressive amount of trails around the geographical center, and when you move to a place like that, you are assuming that you're going to be happy most of the time riding and staying around that area, as getting out becomes more of a rarity, reserved for something special, like once every month or every two. It's not the lifestyle I like, but it's kind of the reality of living in an urban center that large.

    The Bay Area is mountains, mountain biking, a great way of life IMO with awesome culture, restaurants, attractions, etc. Those mountains aren't snow-covered though, and it's pretty far distance/time wise from the ski resorts. I always thought I had it best in the foothills when I could get to Kirkwood or Sierra Ski Ranch/At Tahoe in about 45 min-1hr, and I could ride trails fairly nearby, although I felt there should have been more trails at lower altitude in the foothills.

    Living IN Tahoe is a hoot if you can accept it's not a big city, it's ringed nearly constantly by development and it's like that hole "outdoor life" thing on steroids, due to simply how large it is. You have to deal with the winter snow of course, it doesn't get terribly cold, usually just barely below freezing when snowing (or raining!).

    Salt Lake City is far closer to ski resorts and good mountain biking.

    Denver is eh, kind of a big city out in the plains, but some of the suburbs and communities up the highway but still on the "Front Range" are worth looking at IMO, you again get a good combination of both being close to or in a big city, and being close to good skiing, although be careful and look at the highways first, because you could still end up a few hrs away from the resorts, but that's probably going to be the same 2hrs to get to most of the big resorts, so it's still a lot closer than the Bay Area. Front Range has some good winter mountain biking too.

    I just wrapped up my first winter in Anchorage and I loved getting out and skiing every weekend at Alyeska, usually it was in powder, which is why it was so fun. Unfortunately the powder was usually super-heavy, but the terrain and the heli and cat-skiing at higher altitudes here is second to none. I don't suggest moving here, only that it's challenging finding a "big city" to live in that is close to everything like that. Seattle and Vancouver come to mind, except they are constantly wet in the wintertime and the riding is wet during that time. Some great resorts in the PacNW, but that super heavy cement snow again.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tennisfan76's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by 1 cog frog View Post
    Utah, hands down. With Moab, St. George, Virgin, and the Ogden/Salt Lake City/Park City area, plus the "Greatest Snow on Earth" in one state, you can't go wrong!
    Ditto!!! You would love Utah. Ü
    2011 Specialized Ariel Sport
    Hybrid with 29ers

  30. #30
    MTBR member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    803
    Check out Ogden Utah (backside of Snowbasin Ski Resort): https://www.facebook.com/OgdenTrailsNetwork

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pow77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    214
    Thanks for all the info Jayem, I was about to ask about Seattle. Does sound like a bit of driving to get to Tahoe from San Fran but is it worth it to live in a cool city? When you say the bay area has lots of trails are you talking single track or bike paths? Ive heard great things about the trails around Santa Cruz also.
    Anyone for Boulder? Portland?
    'keep the mission alive!'

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pow77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    214
    Utah keeps popping up, sounds like its got amazing snow and trails!!
    Will have to say you are all very lucky over there to have such good snow and trail networks. Australia has some great bike trails but the snow is well.....
    How do you guys find the transition periods between seasons?
    'keep the mission alive!'

  33. #33
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    26,411
    Quote Originally Posted by pow77 View Post
    Thanks for all the info Jayem, I was about to ask about Seattle. Does sound like a bit of driving to get to Tahoe from San Fran but is it worth it to live in a cool city? When you say the bay area has lots of trails are you talking single track or bike paths? Ive heard great things about the trails around Santa Cruz also.
    Anyone for Boulder? Portland?
    Yeah, Bay Area has lots of singletrack. It's not realistic IMO to consider Tahoe "accessible" from there. Yes, you can drive there, but that's like the people that drive from Los Angeles to Mammoth, which is a great ski resort, but that's just a long long drive. San Fran is a cool city, as well as many of the surrounding areas, it's just they are a ways from skiing.

    I lived in CA for years, we had a boat that we kept down near the Bay Area. That was a fun diversion, etc, but I'd say you live in San Francisco (or surrounding area) to live in San Francisco. It's a great city and some of the surrounding areas are pretty neat too. Again, great culture, nearby mountain biking, etc. What I wouldn't say is that one would live in SF because they like skiing and riding in Tahoe. It's do-able to get up to the hill, but logistically it takes so much effort/time I just think it can't really be the selling point. Tahoe is amazing, but IMO you don't live in SF to go to Tahoe. You live in Sacramento to go to Tahoe, and even then you are still in a lot of traffic often, but you got other places not quite as far up the mountains too.

    Seattle is great, it just didn't sound like you were into that kind of climate. It's very different. Very wet and gloomy all winter long. People are often out riding, yet it's in sloppy conditions in rain-gear. In the summer it's better and you do get plenty of sunshine days. Crystal Mtn and Stevens Pass are great places to go skiing, but typical cascade snow. Whistler and BC are closeby, meaning that you can have some amazing "one-off" trips, the same ones you'd likely be doing to Tahoe if you lived in the Bay Area. I think the entire Seattle area is just amazing. I go through it all the time for work. It's kind of all the good things about the Bay Area with few of the real bad things, although the traffic sucks (but where does it not in a similar area? It surely sucks in the Bay Area too). Seattle is very spread out (the whole surrounding Puget Sound area), without quite as much excessively overdeveloped space. Lots of cool places to explore in the islands and surrounding areas. Olympic Mountains, etc. Day trips maybe down south to Oregon and some of those areas, etc. If you're ok with the winter weather, this would be a great place with a better balance of being close to mountains, riding, and skiing. You get a lot of fog in SF depending on where you are at, but it typically doesn't go far inland, so usually there's a lot more sun in the Bay Area.

    Honestly after a few years here up in Alaska, I'm probably going to put in a transfer for Seattle, I just love the area down there in Seattle so much. Great mountains, climate isn't very harsh (although it is wet), it's sooo green with all the vegetation, they have a nice waterfront just like SF, it just seems so "chill" compared to many big cities, etc.

    Before I got this job in AK, I almost got the same job in Portland. Seems good, but everyone I talked to said you had to get out of the city for mountain biking, there was just nothing real good nearby. There does seem to be decent stuff without driving for hours though. I don't know too much about it, but it's not all that far from Tacoma and some of those areas.
    Last edited by Jayem; 05-05-2013 at 08:10 PM.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    204
    Is there a reason why Whistler/Vancouver isn't at the top of the list? The riding and skiing is simply AMAZING! Snow can be a bit variable sometimes but you'll get your fill of powder days and the mountain biking is out of this world, assuming you like rocky, rooty bad-ass trails in the woods. Vancouver is a great international city - not quite San Francisco - but it does hold it's own and is only about 100KM from Whistler. Squamish is another possibility if you want a small town and it's smack dab in the middle between Whistler and Squamish and has enough mountain biking to keep you busy for a year. But it is a small town and if you're only doing a year, probably best to be in Vancouver OR in Whistler.

    If I were doing this, I think my choices would be

    Whistler/Vancouver
    Colorado - Vail/Denver
    Park City/SLC
    Jackson Hole

    Only reason Jackson Hole is last (because if it was just about skiing it would be first or tied for first with Whistler) is because the other places are closer to major cities.

    Tahoe/San Francisco is not on the list because although I live here and love skiing and mountain biking in Tahoe, it's really not that close and you don't want to spend your whole time driving. You do get used to the driving... and Tahoe can have EPIC seasons (although not the last two)... and San Francisco is a fantastic city... but if you're only going to do it for a short while, you want to be close enough to take advantage of powder days! Those don't come along too often.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    1,325
    Vermont should be on the list too.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    50
    If you read the other thread, you already know what I have to say about Bellingham, WA. It is about 1.5 hours away from the ski resorts, but from Baker to Whistler, there are probably at least a half dozen options within that range.

    And we have legalized marijuana as well if that is your sort of thing.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    18
    Transition in UT is:

    Winter - ski all you want at the best places on Earth, if you want to ride, couple hour drive to Moab/St. George (Southern UT - there's just too many place to list).

    Spring - ski all you want at the best places on Earth, if you want to ride hit some lower valley trails local in SLC and West desert areas, couple hour drive to Southern UT.

    Summer - if you like hot riding, head south or stay down in the valley... sun's up 'til almost 11pm. If you want cool riding, head to the resorts and surrounding areas.

    Fall - again - south or local valley areas, watch the snow start to pile up by Halloween up high and start hitting the slopes!

    We have riding year round and practically can ski year round (maybe mid/late June to early October is out) as well if you're into hiking for your tracks...

  38. #38
    RTM
    RTM is offline
    #1 Latex Salesman
    Reputation: RTM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,845
    Quote Originally Posted by sagealmighty View Post
    If i were you Id go where the skiing is good. any area that has good mtns for skiing undoubtedly has good mtn biking as well.
    with a name like "pow77" I'd suggest you listen to this advice.

  39. #39
    RTM
    RTM is offline
    #1 Latex Salesman
    Reputation: RTM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,845
    Quote Originally Posted by UtahDog View Post
    Transition in UT is:

    Winter - ski all you want at the best places on Earth, if you want to ride, couple hour drive to Moab/St. George (Southern UT - there's just too many place to list).

    Spring - ski all you want at the best places on Earth, if you want to ride hit some lower valley trails local in SLC and West desert areas, couple hour drive to Southern UT.

    Summer - if you like hot riding, head south or stay down in the valley... sun's up 'til almost 11pm. If you want cool riding, head to the resorts and surrounding areas.

    Fall - again - south or local valley areas, watch the snow start to pile up by Halloween up high and start hitting the slopes!

    We have riding year round and practically can ski year round (maybe mid/late June to early October is out) as well if you're into hiking for your tracks...
    So...basically you live in heaven. There's a money tree in your yard and the air & water give you superhuman strength, shiny hair and smooth skin. I knew I should have skipped this thread.

  40. #40
    MTB Mamba
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    393
    Quote Originally Posted by sagealmighty View Post
    If i were you Id go where the skiing is good. any area that has good mtns for skiing undoubtedly has good mtn biking as well.

    The three I would pick are
    summit county colorado
    Park city ut
    lake tahoe ca
    I've never been to Colorado but can vouch for Tahoe and Park City. Definitely great options.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tystevens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,826
    Quote Originally Posted by pow77 View Post
    Utah keeps popping up, sounds like its got amazing snow and trails!!
    Will have to say you are all very lucky over there to have such good snow and trail networks. Australia has some great bike trails but the snow is well.....
    How do you guys find the transition periods between seasons?
    If you can live in a small mountain ski town, there are dozens of places in Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico or California that would be fantastic.

    If you need/want to live in a reasonably sized city, there is really only one answer -- Salt Lake City. Arguably the best ski area in the Lower 48 (if you really like to ski, not have amenities) in Snowbird, which is 30 min from downtown SLC. I've skied most of the highly touted areas in the Western US, and there are few resorts in the same ballpark as the Bird as far as snow quality, quantity, and steep terrain go. Hundreds of miles of single track, bike parks, etc. within the same radius. Plus all the amenities of a city - Div. I university, plentiful jobs and housing, etc. That is how I ended up here, and I can't imagine living anywhere else.

    The transition between seasons is great. For example, right now, all of the lower elevation trails are open, and it is prime season in Moab (4 hrs away). I know plenty of people going for the morning ski/afternoon ride combo here in SLC. In a couple months, the awesome high elevation riding will be open, the ski lifts will have bike hooks on them, just when temps make it uncomfortable to ride in the lower trails. And in the winter, riding in St. George is just a few hours away for great riding, provided you're not too busy skiing. So there really isn't much of a lull between riding/skiing season.
    '11 Specialized Enduro Expert for the trails
    '13 Felt Z4 for the road

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pow77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    214
    It all sounds too good.
    But whats SLC actually like to live in when you not skiing or riding? Are the people nice? Good food (healthy) etc? How does it compare to a city like San Fransisco or Seattle?
    'keep the mission alive!'

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pow77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    214
    I recently did a road trip through Vermont. So beautiful and the trails were amazing. We really liked Burlington. Its definitely on the list as my partners brother lives In NYC.
    'keep the mission alive!'

  44. #44
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    26,411
    East coast has some VERY nice places in the mountains, but the skiing kinda sucks.

    SLC is not like San Francisco or Seattle. The quality of life in Seattle is quite high, lots of city development. Realize that SF or Seattle are big ports, bringing in stuff from all over the world, people from all over the world. It's a huge melting pot, and the culture benefits highly from this. From art museums, to local events (I saw one of the last performances of Dio and H&H at the Warfield an amazing up-close-and-personal popular local venue), to local attractions. Think about in Seattle: Mt Ranier, Puget Sound and seafood, the Olympic Mountains, the floatplane industry and aviation (boeing factor tour is amazing!), pike's place, the coast, WA has a pretty amazing wine country now, and so on. In CA, you got the CA wine country, the Golden Gate and park, Santa Cruz, some amazing breweries, Pt Reyes, the Pacific Coast Highway, and so on. These lists could go on for days.

    I wouldn't willfully live in SLC, but it does have the mountains and everything else, and if you are out in the fringes, suburbs, or up towards the mountains, you aren't going to interact with the big city all the time most likely anyway. Many people become kind of isolated due to the mormon community and their lack of accepting outsiders. They say they accept and love everyone, but you soon realize it only goes as far as those words, and the actions are what really tell the story. It can be especially challenging for kids in school.

    One overwhelming feeling I get when I visit SF is that the "hey day" was back in the 1970s and 1980s. Everything back then looked and was very new. Now you go back, and lots of places look 30 years old and more, and are kinda falling apart, whether it's houses or infrastructure. Seattle doesn't seem to have this nearly as much, and they seem to invest a LOT into their city. All those overpass things that have been turned into parks, lots of the communities just look nicer IMO, the roads seem to be invested in, although traffic can be bad. As you go through different areas of the "Bay Area" this does seem to vary quite a bit, but the more popular and central the location, the more this seems to be true. Again, I love the Bay Area too, I'm not sure if I love it enough to live there. It's far enough away from the mountains that I'd probably pass, but Sacramento is kind of a craphole. SF is a better place to live in IMO as far as city life (some parts of Sac are getting better), but Sac is a better place to be located logistically.

    Don't worry though, someone will be along shortly to tell you why Texas is the place to live. It won't make sense, but that part won't be important.
    Last edited by Jayem; 05-06-2013 at 09:13 PM.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MSU Alum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,940
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    East coast has some VERY nice places in the mountains, but the skiing kinda sucks.

    SLC is not like San Francisco or Seattle.

    I wouldn't willfully live in SLC, but it does have the mountains and everything else, and if you are out in the fringes, suburbs, or up towards the mountains, you aren't going to interact with the big city all the time most likely anyway. Many people become kind of isolated due to the mormon community and their lack of accepting outsiders.

    One overwhelming feeling I get when I visit SF is that the "hey day" was back in the 1970s and 1980s. Everything back then looked and was very new. Now you go back, and lots of places look 30 years old and more, and are kinda falling apart,

    Don't worry though, someone will be along shortly to tell you why Texas is the place to live. It won't make sense, but that part won't be important.
    I haven't been there in a while, but the last time I was in Santa Cruz, I loved it. It seemed like the San Francisco of old. Great surfing (nice replacement for skiing) lots of cute girls (I'm too old and married to REALLY care, but what else is there...really!) I expect there must be good biking. Years ago I went to Nevada City to kayak the north and south forks of the Yuba (another good supplement to skiing) and really loved that town. Great kayaking, I expect there must be good biking and near skiing. I live in Park City Utah, which is the Sodom and Gomorrah of Utah... I haven't seen the Mormon issues you speak of and raised three kids here. The bigger problem for me (I'm not a Mormon) was the rich folks up here. But if you can find the good in any place, it's pretty nice!

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation: PerfectZero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,205
    Man this thread is like a bucket list of places I want to live. As someone who's #1 and #2 hobbies are skiing and biking, I'd probably pick up and head to Vancouver if I didn't have my current job. I loved the Bay area when I was living up there, Santa Cruz seems like it would be an awesome place as well.

    Can't really complain in my current location though.
    buzzes like a fridge

  47. #47
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    26,411
    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    I live in Park City Utah, which is the Sodom and Gomorrah of Utah...
    Yeah, there are lots of awesome towns/cities scattered about that are just awesome to live in and enjoy life and the outdoors. Flagstaff, Jackson Hole, Bend, Durango, Gunnison, Santa Fe, Salida, Bozeman, Truckee, Missoula, Ashland, Sun Valley, etc. Some of these aren't too far from major cities, and some are pretty isolated. Most are loads of fun though in all seasons.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pow77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    214
    Was going to ask would Park City or Ogden areas in Utah be a better lifestyle etc than being in SLC? Or are all the jobs in SLC?
    If I could pick anywhere without worrying about a job or keeping the lady friend happy it would have to be somewhere where I could ride to the trails in summer, and drive a short distance to a ski resort.
    Which places mentioned can you access trails from town? I have to drive to get to any trails and am about 12hrs drive from the nearest ski resort! But can walk down to my local beach in a few minutes
    Thanks for all the info guys.
    'keep the mission alive!'

  49. #49
    Mtn Biker Machinist
    Reputation: 1 cog frog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    957
    Quote Originally Posted by pow77 View Post
    Was going to ask would Park City or Ogden areas in Utah be a better lifestyle etc than being in SLC? Or are all the jobs in SLC?
    If I could pick anywhere without worrying about a job or keeping the lady friend happy it would have to be somewhere where I could ride to the trails in summer, and drive a short distance to a ski resort.
    Which places mentioned can you access trails from town? I have to drive to get to any trails and am about 12hrs drive from the nearest ski resort! But can walk down to my local beach in a few minutes
    Thanks for all the info guys.
    Cost of living is much higher in Park City, it is really a resort town. If you want to have instant access to trails and skiing, then PC is your best bet if you can afford to live there. I live in Ogden, and personally prefer it over SLC. It still has a bit of a small town feel if that is important to you. SLC is more metropolitan (as much as it can be in UT). There are plenty of jobs in either Ogden or SLC, not so much in PC. Lots of outdoor industry companies are locating to Ogden. Also lots of manufacturing in the Ogden area. What type of work are you looking for? Both Ogden and SLC have in town access to trails, as well as riding up the canyons. Both require a drive of 30 min-1hr for access to ski resorts in the winter. Ogden has 2 resorts up the canyon, SLC has multiple. Any other ?'s just ask.

  50. #50
    Picture Unrelated
    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    5,123
    Quote Originally Posted by pow77 View Post
    Was going to ask would Park City or Ogden areas in Utah be a better lifestyle etc than being in SLC? Or are all the jobs in SLC?
    If I could pick anywhere without worrying about a job or keeping the lady friend happy it would have to be somewhere where I could ride to the trails in summer, and drive a short distance to a ski resort.
    Which places mentioned can you access trails from town? I have to drive to get to any trails and am about 12hrs drive from the nearest ski resort! But can walk down to my local beach in a few minutes
    Thanks for all the info guys.
    I'm not sure you could pay me enough to live in Odgen, I really don't care for that place so Park City is the obvious choice there. I'd put the rank Park City > SLC > the rest of the valley. Park City is a great town but it's not cheap, unless you're coming from NYC I guess. SLC is cheap, has plenty going on, and little by little it's becoming a little bit normalized to the rest of the country.

    Jayem makes some reasonable points but SLC is not some complete black hole of enjoyment; it's no Denver or San Fran, but it's also not like you're living in Jonestown. Living downtown, in the Avenues, or in Sugarhouse are all pretty decent, pretty interesting neighborhoods. It takes more work than "cooler" cities to find the good shops or restaurants or places to go, but they're out there, at least to an extent. But I'm biased, I don't care about all that; I'd rather hit the mountains when I'm not working so as long as the local breweries keep cranking out that amazing brew, I'm a happy camper.

    My wife and I are not from SLC originally and there are times (the drivers! How freaking bad can a population be at driving?!? AAAHHH!!!) when we get frustrated with life in a one church, one vote city but then we take a look at where we are and try to find out where we could live and work with what we have nearby. The skiing is easily the best in the US (well, Jackson is probably better for skiing, but only a bit), the biking is world class (except the lift served), the climbing is world class, and you can do pretty much any outdoor activity you can think of (except surfing, sorry) and it's all within 45 minutes of the airport. 15 minutes out my door to Snowbird: I'll take that, thank you very much. There isn't anywhere you can live (where I could get a job like the one I have) with what SLC offers in such proximity. Add in Moab ~4 hrs away and Jackson, Sun Valley, Denver, Vegas, and anything in between within 6 hrs and it's a pretty solid home base. But, of course, to each their own.

    Edit: I did mean to mention that the "out the door" riding in the valley is somewhat limited. You have to live pretty close to the mountains. Out the door in PC is amazing and the free bus system up there makes it that much better.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  51. #51
    Mtn Biker Machinist
    Reputation: 1 cog frog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    957
    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    I'm not sure you could pay me enough to live in Odgen, I really don't care for that place...
    I hear this sentiment from many in UT, but none who live here. Just curious what it is about Ogden that turns you off? I never thought I would live here either, and I call UT home (after lots of moving w/my dad in the Air Force). I have been in Ogden for almost 6 yrs. now and love it. I am more drawn to a smaller town atmosphere, not the hustle and bustle of bigger cities so that may have something to do with it. I am married w/4 kids so that definitely influences where I live. I think Ogden is a great place to raise a family, a great place to work, with plenty of fun stuff to do right in my backyard. I can be on the trail in 10 min by bike from my house, w/lots more great trails 15 min. up the canyon.

    To each his own, but I personally wouldn't live in the Salt Lake Valley, it is too crowded for me. I have lived in lots of places, from small towns in the southern UT desert population 1500, to Vegas, Austin, Hawaii, and Northern CA. I like it here, and can see myself in this area for a long time.

    What you do, what you enjoy, hobbies, tastes etc. all influence where you live. I am just sharing why I think Ogden is a great place to live. My $.02

    frog

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation: manpurse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    402
    Ogden has really come a long way in the past few years. Easy access to skiing and biking from there and good business growth in the area. The whole Mormon/Non-Mormon thing in Utah is an issue for some and a complete non-issue for others. You can find bad apples on both sides. It may not seem as diverse in UT on the surface, but many practicing Mormons have been missionaries for two years in other parts of the world and they bring that influence and knowledge of the culture back with them.

  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MSU Alum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,940
    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    The skiing is easily the best in the US (well, Jackson is probably better for skiing, but only a bit), the biking is world class (except the lift served), the climbing is world class, and you can do pretty much any outdoor activity you can think of (except surfing, sorry)
    A little over 4 hours away! Alex Gray Surfing the Snake River in Wyoming | SURFLINE.COM

  54. #54
    MTBR member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    803
    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    I'm not sure you could pay me enough to live in Odgen, I really don't care for that place so Park City is the obvious choice there. I'd put the rank Park City > SLC > the rest of the valley. Park City is a great town but it's not cheap, unless you're coming from NYC I guess. SLC is cheap, has plenty going on, and little by little it's becoming a little bit normalized to the rest of the country.

    Jayem makes some reasonable points but SLC is not some complete black hole of enjoyment; it's no Denver or San Fran, but it's also not like you're living in Jonestown. Living downtown, in the Avenues, or in Sugarhouse are all pretty decent, pretty interesting neighborhoods. It takes more work than "cooler" cities to find the good shops or restaurants or places to go, but they're out there, at least to an extent. But I'm biased, I don't care about all that; I'd rather hit the mountains when I'm not working so as long as the local breweries keep cranking out that amazing brew, I'm a happy camper.

    My wife and I are not from SLC originally and there are times (the drivers! How freaking bad can a population be at driving?!? AAAHHH!!!) when we get frustrated with life in a one church, one vote city but then we take a look at where we are and try to find out where we could live and work with what we have nearby. The skiing is easily the best in the US (well, Jackson is probably better for skiing, but only a bit), the biking is world class (except the lift served), the climbing is world class, and you can do pretty much any outdoor activity you can think of (except surfing, sorry) and it's all within 45 minutes of the airport. 15 minutes out my door to Snowbird: I'll take that, thank you very much. There isn't anywhere you can live (where I could get a job like the one I have) with what SLC offers in such proximity. Add in Moab ~4 hrs away and Jackson, Sun Valley, Denver, Vegas, and anything in between within 6 hrs and it's a pretty solid home base. But, of course, to each their own.

    Edit: I did mean to mention that the "out the door" riding in the valley is somewhat limited. You have to live pretty close to the mountains. Out the door in PC is amazing and the free bus system up there makes it that much better.
    Yep. Most Ogden-haters have spent very little time here!

  55. #55
    MTBR member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    803
    Quote Originally Posted by pow77 View Post
    Was going to ask would Park City or Ogden areas in Utah be a better lifestyle etc than being in SLC? Or are all the jobs in SLC?
    If I could pick anywhere without worrying about a job or keeping the lady friend happy it would have to be somewhere where I could ride to the trails in summer, and drive a short distance to a ski resort.
    Which places mentioned can you access trails from town? I have to drive to get to any trails and am about 12hrs drive from the nearest ski resort! But can walk down to my local beach in a few minutes
    Thanks for all the info guys.

    Park City is pretty awesome. There are tons of trails and three resorts in town. It is very expensive though.

    If you want to live in the city (as big as a city gets in UT), then SLC would be more your style. UT is pretty conservative, but SLC is very liberal. There are plenty of good restaurants/bars too. It is the most crowded of the three.

    Ogden is a diamond in the rough. There are some rough spots, but the city as a whole, is seeing a very large tranformation (very outdoor oriented). I would recommend the East bench area, North of WSU. I can ride 35 miles from my door; there are multiple THs on the bench within minutes. If you hop in your car, you can head up Ogden Canyon and ride Snowbasin/Forest service trails. I would argue that Ogden has more out-the-door MTBing than SLC (but not PC). Powder, Wolf Mt, and basin are a short 20 minute drive. Ogden is a good mix of liberal/conservative folks.

    Anywhere in Northern Utah is great for skiing/boarding (11 resorts within 45-60 minutes of each other).

  56. #56
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    13,472
    Tahoe. I lived there for two years and it was a blast from a snow and bike perspective.

    First, I loved the riding because it is so diverse. For the months when you can ride around Tahoe, it is great alpine riding, and it never rains (no mid-day storms). Just perfect weather all the time. Loads of stuff to ride. Of course, for some of the best/highest stuff, it may only be fully clear 4 months some years. My first summer there, Hole in the Ground (my favorite) was only clear for a little over 3 months, but that is unusual. Plenty of stuff usually good for 5-6 months though.

    However, you continue to have good options even in the early spring and late fall. One hour east and you are in the Nevada desert with plenty of good option. To the west, the foothills in places like the South Yuba are amazing in a whole different way from Tahoe. And then in the dead of winter you can go an hour to Auburn and ride pretty much year round. Many were the day I rode powder in the morning, then drove an hour to Auburn and got a great MTB ride in.

    A very different skiing experience from places like CO and UT. The snow is heavy and wet (Sierra Cement), but there is an insane amount of it. From a back-country perspective I liked it because it remains relatively stable compared to many places in CO and UT.

    The proximity to Reno (under an hour) is a big plus IMO. I found it to be a useful city with (mostly) friendly, down to earth people (I seldom went to Casino part of town). The proximity to the Bay Area is a mixed blessing. Loved going down there, but was not crazy about many of the folks that came up FROM there. I imagine many ski towns experience the same thing, but this is the only one I lived in.

    Overall, summer was my preferred time in Tahoe. If money and a job were no object, I think I would live there again. Unfortunately, my living situation (I lived at the top of Donner Pass) was tied to my job which I moved on from.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tystevens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,826
    Quote Originally Posted by pow77 View Post
    It all sounds too good.
    But whats SLC actually like to live in when you not skiing or riding? Are the people nice? Good food (healthy) etc? How does it compare to a city like San Fransisco or Seattle?
    I grew up in Portland, and I find SLC to be a fantastic place to live, provided you can entertain yourself somewhat. If you are one that needs lots of museums, 'culture,' an endless array of night clubs, etc., you might get a little bored, I suppose (I don't really know, 'cuz I'm not into that so much). For me, a hike up the mountain into the adjacent wilderness area (yes, there is actually a wilderness area that borders SLC) with my wife to sit and watch the sunset over the Great Salt Lake is better than any show that man can put on. SLC may not have world class symphonies or operas or museums, but I couldn't care less.

    Food options -- anecdotal example -- my sister and her husband lived with us 2 summers ago while he had an internship with a firm here in SLC. They are very much foodies. They were living in Boston, and now live in Austin. When they come to visit, they still have a list of restaurants they "miss" and need to hit up while in town. Last time they were here, he commented that he wished he could have gotten a job in SLC. Not saying SLC is better than Boston or Austin, just that it can hold its own. Again, not why most of us live here, but there is enough to satisfy.

    Culture -- anywhere you go will have its own culture. If you are a person that can deal with different people, you'll be fine. If you can't, and feel judged because people may have different beliefs or lifestyles than you, you won't like it. I am an LDS transplant to SLC, so I suppose I can't really opine, but I know many, many people who are not LDS and love living here. I know a few who don't and can't stand it. I know others who thought they couldn't stand living here, left, and couldn't wait to move back. Having Snowbird 30 minutes away cures many ills! I think it is a great place to live.

    SLC vs. Ogden. I haven't spent much time in Ogden. All things considered, both would be great options. But my preference would be SLC -- Snowbird/Alta > Powder Mountain/Snow Basin, both for proximity, terrain, and snow quality and quantity. And that isn't as much a criticism of Ogden's skiing offerings (which are very good) as a compliment to Salt Lake's. Although I guess I'm a little biased, because the Bird is my favorite place to ski on earth, aside from possibly Jackson Hole. But there is this phenom called the "Lake Effect", and what happens is dry air comes across the desert, picks up moisture from the Great Salt Lake, and typically funnels right up Little Cottonwood Canyon, which is a straight glacial canyon. As a result, Snowbird and Alta will often get 2 ft while the other areas get 6 inches.

    Considering mountain biking, I would also give the edge to SLC. The Wasatch Crest trail lets out in SLC, and is a phenomenal trail. Corner Canyon, Mill Creek Canyon, plus being closer to Park City, plus having access to Utah County's trails (Lambert, AF Canyon, Eagle Mountain bike park). Ogden probably has some great trails, but they are at least less famous than SLC's offerings.
    '11 Specialized Enduro Expert for the trails
    '13 Felt Z4 for the road

  58. #58
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MSU Alum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,940
    Quote Originally Posted by Tystevens View Post
    They are very much foodies. They were living in Boston, and now live in Austin. When they come to visit, they still have a list of restaurants they "miss" and need to hit up while in town.
    What restaurants do they miss?

  59. #59
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by 1 cog frog View Post
    I hear this sentiment from many in UT, but none who live here. Just curious what it is about Ogden that turns you off? I never thought I would live here either, and I call UT home (after lots of moving w/my dad in the Air Force). I have been in Ogden for almost 6 yrs. now and love it. I am more drawn to a smaller town atmosphere, not the hustle and bustle of bigger cities so that may have something to do with it. I am married w/4 kids so that definitely influences where I live. I think Ogden is a great place to raise a family, a great place to work, with plenty of fun stuff to do right in my backyard. I can be on the trail in 10 min by bike from my house, w/lots more great trails 15 min. up the canyon.
    frog
    +1

    I moved to Ogden from Steamboat Springs, CO (also a great ski town with a bike scene that seems to be coming along, but probably too isolated for the OP) and wasn't all that excited about it at first thanks to the e-complaints I read from people that probably spent little time here, let alone lived here. I wanted to move to Park City, which seemed like a nicer version of Steamboat with more skiing/snowboarding and more biking. Within about a year I had forgotten all about PC.

    PC is a nice town and probably the best biking town in northern UT, but it's also a tiny, awkward tourist trap (at least that's how it strikes me when I'm there). Real estate is jacked up in comparison to the rest of UT; the skiing is second-rate; and it seems like the type of place where people are constantly moving through, as opposed to staying in - nothing that makes it horrible, but just not the place for me. I've also gotten the occasional condescending vibe from some of the shop owners there - basically like they're ignoring you and waiting for the rich investment banker from Manhattan to walk through the door. I like to visit once or twice a year, and I wouldn't mind living closer (SLC) to get there more for biking and events, but I'm glad I don't live there.

    Ogden might be a little small for the OP, but it's a nice small city/college town with one of the best outdoor communities anywhere - two huge ski resorts with no crowds, tons of hiking/biking trails straight from town, fishing, a reservoir 10 minutes away, rock climbing, a couple of whitewater parks, etc. etc. Back around 06 to 08 or so, just before I moved here, the government was making a real push to make it an outdoor recreation capital, and there was a bunch of talk about "first in the U.S." type stuff like an artificial ice climbing wall and via ferrata. I think the latter opened for a while but I haven't heard anything about the ice climbing thing - not really my scene, anyway. Live on the East Bench and you can hike, bike and backpack out of your backyard. Ogden is also roughly halfway between Moab and Jackson Hole, for when you feel like a weekend trip.

    Ty mentioned the skiing being better in Alta-Bird and I can respect that opinion for sure, but Ogden resorts are a big reason why I have trouble with the idea of moving to SLC, which I think I'd love otherwise. Yes, Bird is likely to get two feet to Snowbasin/Powder's six inches or a foot, but it's also likely to get torn up by 11 a.m., whereas I could show up to SB or Powder at that time and ride freshies all day. Something to be said about riding straight to the lift seat, run after run on John Paul versus standing around the corner for an hour outside the Bird tram. I'll agree that the biking is better in SLC, though.

    As for the OP, it sounds like SLC would be his best bet in UT. And since it's really the biggest US city that's essentially in mountains with ski resorts, if he decides it's too small, he's really looking more for a big city where he can commute to skiing/biking in the same day (Denver, Seattle, Vancouver ...).

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tystevens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,826
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeWE View Post
    PC is a nice town and probably the best biking town in northern UT, but it's also a tiny, awkward tourist trap (at least that's how it strikes me when I'm there). Real estate is jacked up in comparison to the rest of UT; the skiing is second-rate; and it seems like the type of place where people are constantly moving through, as opposed to staying in - nothing that makes it horrible, but just not the place for me. I've also gotten the occasional condescending vibe from some of the shop owners there - basically like they're ignoring you and waiting for the rich investment banker from Manhattan to walk through the door. I like to visit once or twice a year, and I wouldn't mind living closer (SLC) to get there more for biking and events, but I'm glad I don't live there.

    ***

    Ty mentioned the skiing being better in Alta-Bird and I can respect that opinion for sure, but Ogden resorts are a big reason why I have trouble with the idea of moving to SLC, which I think I'd love otherwise. Yes, Bird is likely to get two feet to Snowbasin/Powder's six inches or a foot, but it's also likely to get torn up by 11 a.m., whereas I could show up to SB or Powder at that time and ride freshies all day. Something to be said about riding straight to the lift seat, run after run on John Paul versus standing around the corner for an hour outside the Bird tram. I'll agree that the biking is better in SLC, though.
    Funny assessment of PC, and quite on point now that I think about it. I lived up there for 2 seasons (as a ski bum), and worked there for 3 and a half (commuting up from SLC). It is kind of an interesting place, lots of money and lots of curious people. Although it was on my wife and my radar when we moved here, we don't really want to live there anymore. Versus PC, I think I would be just as content up on the east bench of SLC -- better skiing, good riding, better real estate prices, etc.

    And there is something to be said about the less crowded resorts, to be sure. That is the main drawback of Snowbird -- it gets torn up fast after it snows. So many locals ski there, they can all really ski and know the secret spots, so there is not much that you get to keep to yourself. Compared to PC stuff, where you can have your secret pockets that only you and a few others know about, because 90% of the skiers are tourists and are content to debate their prowess skiing groomed runs over apres ski!

    Anyway, I didn't mean to sound like I was bagging on Ogden -- I wasn't. It would be a great place to relocate to for someone looking to ride and ski in great conditions.
    '11 Specialized Enduro Expert for the trails
    '13 Felt Z4 for the road

  61. #61
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pow77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    214
    Wow thanks you all for such awesome info. Its great to hear all your opinions.
    I don't want to make this thread too much about me, but just to clarify. My girlfriend and I are planning to do a year in the States and maybe a more permanent move later on (fingers crossed) so that's why i am keen to hear about all the great places. We have visited a number of times and it feels like we are being drawn there.
    I am aiming to do an internship or traineeship once I finish my uni degree. I am studying environmental science (resource management). But will still aim to get a job to pay the bills (i have done mostly hospitality/kitchen work) as i am not expecting a payed internship position. I will be applying for a few internships so which one I get will determine where I end up. I am also keen to do some volunteering in my field to gain some more knowledge. Trail building is definitely something I have enjoyed and would love to learn more.
    Thanks all
    'keep the mission alive!'

  62. #62
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,016
    I've lived in many of the aforementioned places: Durango for 3 years, Vail for 8 years, Leadville for 1.5 years, Steamboat for 2 years, in and around Boulder for about 17 years, Summit County for 2 years, Grand Junction for 3 years, North Lake Tahoe for 1.5 years, South Lake Tahoe for 1 year, Monterey for 3 years, Sonoma County for 2 years, and now live in Marin. I've also spent plenty of time in many other ski/mountain towns. As a life-long skier that worked in the industry for 20+ years and has been mountain biking for 27 years, Durango tops the list for the best biking/skiing town. Why?

    Skiing: DMR (Purgatory) 35 minutes away, Wolf Creek 1.5 hours away, Telluride 2 hours door to door, Silverton (arguably the BEST lift accessed, big mountain skiing in the US) an hour and 15 away, and the epicness of the BC skiing on Red Mt. Pass as well as spring skiing on the surrounding passes all within a 45 minute to 1.5 hour drive, plus the fact that you can drive to most of Colorado and New Mexico's ski areas in about 5 hours.

    Biking: Miles and miles of sweet singletrack surrounding -and insanely accessible- from town, 70+ miles of the amazing, high-altitude (and bike legal) Colorado Trail from Molas Pass that ends in town, Phil's World 40 minutes away, Moab 2.5 hours away, riding year-round in several spots within 2 hours of town (I've skied in the morning at Purg and ridden in Farmington in the afternoon in January), and within an easy day's drive are mecca's like Sedona, White Mesa, and Gooseberry among many others.

    Sure there are places that have more skiing right outside your door, and there are places that you can ride year round from your door, but the two together are nearly impossible (unless you have a fat bike for the snow or like riding in freezing mud and rain) but in my relatively extensive experience chasing the dual dream of singletrack and pow turns, Durango is the best. There are detractions: It's far from a major airport (but it does have one served by several airlines), it's only about 16K people (but it has 4 world-class breweries), it's expensive compared to the average American town (but cheap compared to most resort towns), and you have to drive an hour to find a Target (but there is no traffic)... It's also a college town with a good arts, music, sports (especially cycling events like the Iron Horse Classic, a serious bike polo circuit; there's a reason so many pros live there) and nightlife scene, some great restaurants and a lot of local/natural food choices, decent job options (unlike the seasonality of most ski towns), and a pretty diverse economy. I'd be living there still if life allowed it... Here's a few shots:

    The Colorado Trail in July
    Great mounatin biking and sking locations?-33490250.jpg
    Great mounatin biking and sking locations?-90551880.jpg

    Singletrack above downtown
    Great mounatin biking and sking locations?-66546987.jpg

    Looking north into the La Plata Range. There's a lot of singletrack in those hills...
    Name:  746276406_803faf3930.jpg
Views: 1361
Size:  165.4 KB

    Phil's World
    Great mounatin biking and sking locations?-38195798.jpg
    Great mounatin biking and sking locations?-imag0519z.jpg

    A pow day at Purg (DMR)
    Great mounatin biking and sking locations?-imag0252a.jpg

    Silverton Mountain
    Great mounatin biking and sking locations?-1067.jpg
    Last edited by huntermos; 05-07-2013 at 11:05 PM. Reason: some pics

  63. #63
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    26,411
    Quote Originally Posted by huntermos View Post

    Skiing: DMR (Purgatory) 35 minutes away, Wolf Creek 1.5 hours away, Telluride 2 hours door to door, Silverton (the BEST lift accessed, big mountain skiing in the US) an hour and 15 away, and the epicness of the BC skiing on Red Mt. Pass as well as spring skiing on the surrounding passes all within a 45 minute to 1.5 hour drive, plus the fact that you can drive to most of Colorado and New Mexico's ski areas in about 5 hours.
    Durango is great in most respects, and it's on the edge of the mountains, so there is quite a bit of dry land with no snow nearby and just out of town. Monument Valley is just around the corner, along with amazing rock formations. Moab is not too far. This gives good options to escape any winter weather. On the other hand, Durango Mountain Resort is kinda "meh", Wolf Creek isn't much better, despite getting the most snow. It's kind of useful in "lean snow" years or at times of the year when every other resort is struggling to open. That's where it's strength is, but otherwise it's pretty small, not much vertical at all, etc. Silverton is pretty crazy and not for most people, so there ends up not being a whole lot in the middle that is easily accessible. I love Durango, I use to fly there all the time, but I wouldn't call the location optimal for skiing. I guess the positive is at least you HAVE a choice and can pick from a few resorts, but ToHellURide is a little far and everything else is way far. I could live there easy, but for anyone wanting a city nearby, it's going to be kind of lacking, so I think it misses on a few points here. It's not that I want to go to Snowmass, Copper Basin, Vail and Breckenridge all the time, but it's nice to have those options and have them not be much more distant. Kind of like in Tahoe how you can go to Sierra, Heavenly, Homewood, Squaw, Alpine, and so on, all with very different crowds, capacities, terrain, size, and so on. I think the OP is shying away from "mountain towns", although Durango is one of the bigger ones, along with Bend, and a few others...

    Speaking about Bend, uhh, what about Bend? Easy side of the Cascades, so much drier, usually drier snow too on Mt Bachelor, a few other resorts around, although it won't have the 20-30 resorts of CO. The coast/Portland is not out of the question as far as a day trip, or Seattle for that matter. Some of these towns, like Bend, have a great small-town feel, but have gotten big enough that you won't miss much from a bigger city. I'd still recommend Seattle if you want a lot of neat attractions and things to do nearby, whereas Bend will be more limited to just the natural attractions like mountains, wilderness, etc.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  64. #64
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pow77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    214
    Loving those pics! Phil's World looks super fun.
    At the moment i am open to ideas as nothing is set. Personally i am from a small town so not really shying away from mountain towns but my lady definitely would like to be at least near a cool city. She knows that to live in a mountain town sometime is my dream. Ride nice trails in summer and play in the snow for winter. Sounds like there are lots of places I would love to spend time in.
    'keep the mission alive!'

  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,016
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I love Durango, I use to fly there all the time, but I wouldn't call the location optimal for skiing.
    Well, I never said that Durango was optimum for skiing, rather that it's optimum for skiing, biking, and many other activities that are of interest to people, the very attributes that the OP originally stated he was looking for. In other words, it's a multi-demensional town, with a plethora of opportunities for skiing, riding, whitewater, fishing, climbing, backpacking, hiking, canyoneering, etc., and it has a diversity of landscapes and ecosystems rare in most other places all within a 2 hour radius. It also has a much more diverse and vibrant economy than most other mountain towns. It's also not really a "mountain town" as it is the largest population center in the southwest part of the state and is located in the foothills of the San Juans. Purg has great trees, some sweet OB cliff lines if you know where to look, and if you can't have fun there on a powder day, you might as well give up skiing. If you find Wolf Creek boring, then you should really give up skiing, there's a lot of terrain there despite the lack of vert and it's usually buried under 2 feet of fresh and stays untracked for days. There's also a small, steep city-run hill right in town and a great little hill 20 minutes west of town that has epic night skiing when it's dumping out (Ski Hesperus). A squallywood or bro-brah filled Jackson full of gnarly lines it's not (of course you can find plenty of them at Silverton), but at least those attitudes are one thing you don't have to deal with in Durango or the ski areas in the San Juans.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Speaking about Bend, uhh, what about Bend?
    Bend is not my style, although they have great beer and the Phil's trails are awesome, if somewhat one dimensional. I've spent a fair amount of time there, and IMO, Bend is to big and spread out in the all-American mini-mall sort of way, the riding, while really fun, is predominately dusty and non-technical, the skiing is ok at Bach but much more dependent on weather (wind, rain, whiteout) than Colorado or Utah and the other nearest quality skiing option (Hood Meadows) is 2 hours away and suffers from the same issues, the geography/topography is too flat and monolithic for my taste as is the endless monoculture pine forests, what riding you can do in the winter is pretty cold, and it's too far a drive to the winter desert riding spots of the southwest for a weekend away. If I was still a hardcore climber, and whitewater kayaker, Bend would be more attractive thanks to Smith Rocks and the fact that the Deschutes runs with a consistent flow year round, but I'm too beat up to do those things much anymore. Yes, this is my opinion and of course there are many that would disagree, but for overall year-round, multi-sport options outside of the hustle, pollution, and headaches of bigger cities like SLC/Ogden/Boise (surprised no one has mentioned Boise...), Durango is hard to beat.

  66. #66
    Back of the pack fat guy
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,958
    Nobody has mentioned Idaho (except for Sun Valley, by which I would infer that they mean the Wood River Valley, since "Sun Valley" is technically just the resort and a very small incorporated part of the valley that is home to mostly extremely wealthy out of staters and condo owners.) Boise is a great place to live with a local ski area that isn't great, but it's close. 130+ miles of singletrack that starts literally a mile or less from the downtown core. Three other ski/mountain biking areas within 2 - 2.5 hour drive - McCall and Ketchum/Hailey. Both are pricy, there are limited employment options other than service industry, and they have long shoulder seasons where you can't ride or ski. About 5 - 6 hour drive to the trails and ski areas around Driggs/Victor/Jackson from Boise. About the same distance to Bend and SLC.

    Is the Boise riding epic? No. Is the skiing/boarding epic? No. But, the economy is good, lots of jobs (especially in high paying medical and tech fields), low crime, Division 1 football, state capitol, local university, opera/theater/music scene, all of the recreation is close, there's also tons of whitewater rafting and kayaking and fly fishing, and you won't see the crowds that you would in Durango/SLC/Tahoe/add another name here of some "epic" place to live here. Think of it as a smaller, less crowded, more relaxed, less expensive version of SLC or the Denver area.

    Just food for thought.

  67. #67
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    70
    Heavily considering the PNW (outside either portland/seattle) would love to hear some opinions on those spots. In addition to mtb and skiing fly fishing is a hobby and love being near the water.

  68. #68
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Rev Bubba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,745
    Utah for the best skiing and mountain biking but if you are looking for a city, there is only one true world class city in the US. - New York. In comparison, every place else is a small town.

    I'm not recommending you move to NYC for skiing or biking but if you travel all the way to the US, spend a couple of weeks in NYC or other east coast cities like Philadelphia and Boston. East coast cities are much different than the rest of the US. Montreal is worth a visit too.

    There is plenty of skiing but it is more difficult and the mountain biking, while readily available, is going to involve a great deal of rocks and roots, not the long smooth trails I've experienced out west.

    So, back to my original suggestion, Utah for the best combination of skiing and biking. Just don't expect much in the way of urban life. And, yes, San Francisco is worth a long look but it's not like you can jump in the car and be skiing in anything less than three hours or more.

  69. #69
    Norđwegr
    Reputation: Vegard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    1,573
    Depending on how far you want to travel, the lyngen alps in Norway.

  70. #70
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MSU Alum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,940
    Quote Originally Posted by Rev Bubba View Post
    Utah for the best skiing and mountain biking but if you are looking for a city, there is only one true world class city in the US. - New York. In comparison, every place else is a small town.

    I'm not recommending you move to NYC for skiing or biking but if you travel all the way to the US, spend a couple of weeks in NYC or other east coast cities like Philadelphia and Boston. East coast cities are much different than the rest of the US. Montreal is worth a visit too.

    There is plenty of skiing but it is more difficult and the mountain biking, while readily available, is going to involve a great deal of rocks and roots, not the long smooth trails I've experienced out west.

    So, back to my original suggestion, Utah for the best combination of skiing and biking. Just don't expect much in the way of urban life. And, yes, San Francisco is worth a long look but it's not like you can jump in the car and be skiing in anything less than three hours or more.
    I've never understood the attraction to the big cities on the east coast of the U.S. I'm not really saying they are bad places, I just don't know why anyone would want to be there, and I grew up about 50 miles north of NYC and stay there about once a month. I bring folks into these cities from overseas and am always a little embarrassed that this is their first taste of America.

  71. #71
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Rev Bubba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,745
    Seriously, how many tourists have Des Moine or Denver or SLC or any number of other "cities" on their bucket list? I don't get embarrassed by NYC, I get excited by the pulse of life. No, I don't live there so don't confuse me with a hometown booster but I did have the pleasure of working in various locations over a 30 year period. How can you call a place that is closed after 5 PM and on weekends and sends you to the burbs for entertainment a city? I've had that experience in enough towns..

  72. #72
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MSU Alum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,940
    Quote Originally Posted by Rev Bubba View Post
    Seriously, how many tourists have Des Moine or Denver or SLC or any number of other "cities" on their bucket list? I don't get embarrassed by NYC, I get excited by the pulse of life. No, I don't live there so don't confuse me with a hometown booster but I did have the pleasure of working in various locations over a 30 year period. How can you call a place that is closed after 5 PM and on weekends and sends you to the burbs for entertainment a city? I've had that experience in enough towns..
    Yeah, I agree, to an extent. "How can you call a place that is closed after 5 PM and on weekends and sends you to the burbs for entertainment a city?" - You can't! I'm just thinking that anyone who's been to places, or coming from places, like (almost any) major city in Europe would be pretty disappointed by NYC. San Fran (where they really do roll the sidewalks up at 10 PM!) would be a different story. I especially love the cities in Europe, and Vancouver and Montreal are great as well. But, a lot of people really love New York!

  73. #73
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    335
    Whistler
    Aspen
    North Lake Tahoe
    Jackson Hole
    Crested Butte
    Telluride


    Cities:
    Vancouver>Seattle>SLC
    Last edited by Low Pressure; 05-24-2013 at 01:12 PM.

  74. #74
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pow77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    214
    Have spent some time in NYC and did enjoy it. I am from a small town and never liked any of the cities in Australia very much, but NYC is another world! My brother in law lives in Brooklyn so will definitely be vising again. I could consider living there for a year or two if I did regular trips out of the city. I also liked Vancouver and would love to spend some more time there.
    'keep the mission alive!'

  75. #75
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    1
    EP is correct in that the City of Sun Valley is small (as in population, 1016) but amongst the 2nd/3rd or 4th mcmansions there exists plenty of less expensive rental options. I know, i've lived in one for almost 20 years! If you look at the entire Wood River Valley - including Bellevue, Hailey, Ketchum, the unincorporated county land (of which there is quite a bit) and S.V - any argument about being too expensive goes out the window. Of course you'll probably have to live in Hailey but if you have a family Hailey is a hard place to beat. If you think ALL the jobs in this area are service oriented then you clearly have not lived here (high-tech, manufacturing & design, St. Lukes, Smith Optics, Scott -for only a little while longer, unfortunately relocating HQ to UT- just to name a few.) However, if you don't have a 'whatever it takes' attitude, it'll be hard to get good work but that can be said of most places.

    That's great, you say, but gimme some facts. Okay...

    Yesterday: rode my cruiser bike 1.5 miles to fish the Big Wood. Caught 5 beautiful, likely wild, bows in 1 hours. On one side of the river, perched above the cottonwoods, willow and pine was Ernest Hemingway's house.
    Wednesday: rode my mtn bike, from my door, to a trail-head .5 miles away where it interconnects with literally hundreds of miles of, mostly, ST! I'm pretty sure you can ride to Boise if you really wanted to but once you got there, i'm sorry to say, you'll probably want to get outta there ASAP.

    Now here's the crux of this argument against Boise and for the Wood River Valley: there is no comparison. Lots of people, cars, noise - you know, city stuff. Not only that but Boise is HOT in the summer (102 today, 106 next Tuesday!), crappy/gray in the winter and okay for 2-3 months of the year if there's not an inversion creating a smog problem. Yes, smog. Sure, you can ride to the mountains via the treeless foothills to escape but you'll probably just be heading to the Wood River or McCall (which is a cool little mountain town too.) You either LOVE Boise or hate it.

    This weekend: Ride Sun Valley bike event with a weeks worth of events, rides, concerts and usa cycling marathon mountain bike national championships.
    I will be, however, driving 1 hour to Redfish Lake which is, hands-down, one of the prettiest alpine lakes you'll ever see! AND, the Redfish Lake Loop is one of the most fun rides in the Stanley area.
    What's the Stanley area? Oh boy, one place in Idaho needs to be kept a "secret" (unlike Rebecca's Private Idaho -- go ahead, Google it and then start training. Then make your plans to come visit this September.)
    Two weeks ago: Drove 8 hours to Moab where the early June temps literally melted helmet but, as we know, the riding IS epic. I don't like melting though...
    On the LONG way home, I fished a favorite, unamed river and caught, in 13 years of fishing was arguably the most beautiful wild cutthroat and I've caught my share in Yellowstone.
    Darnit, Yellowstone - another unbelievable place a mere 4 hours away! And getting there you'll be an hour away from Grand Targhee or 1.5 from Jackson. 4 hours to Snowbasin (uh-oh, another area to look at) and 5+ to Brighton/Alta/Bird/Solitude.

    As for the skiing in Sun valley, even though it's average would barely be enough to open Jhole or Alta, if we have 150" per year, you can still ski 3000' of uninterrupted sweet corduroy. Steeps/chutes/cliffs not so much but when Baldy get's over 200", it's unbeatable. I've skied it for near 20 years now and it's amazing.

    Maybe you a rafter? 2 hours to the mother lode.

    Snowmobiler? 2 hours north or northwest and you're in heaven.

    Cross-country skier? You too, have found heaven

    Backcountry's more your thang? Pioneers, Sawtooths, Boulders, Smokeys - all right out your door. For real.

    Beer? Yep, finally one brewery in Ketchum.

    I think that's all you need for now.

  76. #76
    mtbr member
    Reputation: telemike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    490
    Mt Shasta City, Bend

  77. #77
    OMG!
    Reputation: adjunkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    412
    I gotta throw in my vote for summit county colorado.

    -Beautiful place
    -Close to a major city and international airport
    -Competition between resorts means CHEAP passes(not lift tickets though). ie. 5 mountain pass
    -Huge ski resorts compared to most other places. You won't get bored.
    -Decent social life and local economy. Party?! Jobs?! A little of each.
    -Did I mention, you'll see more beautiful sights in a month than most people will see in their entire lives.

  78. #78
    Afric Pepperbird
    Reputation: dirt farmer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    4,739
    Quote Originally Posted by huntermos View Post
    Bend is not my style, although they have great beer and the Phil's trails are awesome, if somewhat one dimensional. I've spent a fair amount of time there, and IMO, Bend is to big and spread out in the all-American mini-mall sort of way, the riding, while really fun, is predominately dusty and non-technical, the skiing is ok at Bach but much more dependent on weather (wind, rain, whiteout) than Colorado or Utah and the other nearest quality skiing option (Hood Meadows) is 2 hours away and suffers from the same issues, the geography/topography is too flat and monolithic for my taste as is the endless monoculture pine forests, what riding you can do in the winter is pretty cold, ....
    Yes! Take what this man says seriously! DO NOT MOVE TO BEND!

  79. #79
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    63
    I totally agree with Co_CA_ID_? Boise sucks, you don't want to live here.. stay away. I'd type more but I have to decide whether I want to ride my mountain bike, hit the river in my kayak, grab a tall cold one at one of the local brew pubs, get a round of golf in,.......oh, I have to stop by the bank and deposit my "no good paying jobs in healthcare or high tech" paycheck.

    Best Towns 2010: Boise, Idaho | Idaho | OutsideOnline.com

  80. #80
    mtbr member
    Reputation: likeaboss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    807
    I certainly have not been everywhere but my favorite would be Burke/kingdom Trails for the following reasons.

    Classic New England old school back woods skiing experience. No crowds. Best ski bar at the bears den. An authentic skiing community. No resort like feeling. Folks are super friendly and we return every year to continue conversations with locals we have met over the years.

    Kingdom Trails. Need I say more?

  81. #81
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    335
    I'm a ski in/out, ride from my door kind of guy. Aspen works for me.

    If I had to move?

    Whistler
    Verbier
    Niseko
    Bariloche

  82. #82
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ucdengboss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    237
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    but Sacramento is kind of a craphole. SF is a better place to live in IMO as far as city life (some parts of Sac are getting better), but Sac is a better place to be located logistically.
    As a resident of Sacramento I must agree with this. The nice thing about Sacramento is that you are close to a lot of things. In a 1hr 45min drive I can be over the top of the Sierras, to the ocean, to S.F., to Napa, to 50 different mountain lakes, etc. The only problem is that you are a short drive to things and not actually living where any of those things are.

    Auburn trail heads are only 30 minutes from my doorstep and that is the closest good MTB trails to me really. I have backpacked off of Grouse Ridge but never rode there and that is next on my list but even that is a good hour drive.

    So for a big city being close to bike trails and ski resorts maybe Sacramento is perfect. If going to small town route is an option then certainly look into the other towns further up in the foothills or South Lake Tahoe.

  83. #83
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1
    Whistler
    Revelstoke
    Fernie
    Golden

  84. #84
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pow77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    214
    Quote Originally Posted by damenm View Post
    Whistler
    Revelstoke
    Fernie
    Golden
    I know the others have great MTB trails but never heard much about Golden's trails? I know there is some serious elevation around those parts.
    'keep the mission alive!'

Similar Threads

  1. Great Write-Up on Arizona Mountain Biking
    By traildoc in forum Arizona
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 07-01-2012, 12:20 AM
  2. Amazing Coating that Coud be Used for Mounatin Biking Gear
    By michael1 in forum Apparel and Protection
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 01-22-2012, 04:57 AM
  3. 29" tire recommendation for biking the great divide route
    By isignay in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 01-03-2012, 07:06 PM
  4. A Collection of Great Biking Pictures Day 1
    By GravityBolivia in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-14-2011, 10:42 PM
  5. Biking in Great Falls
    By funhawg07 in forum Idaho, Montana, Wyoming
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 05-22-2011, 04:24 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •