Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 50 of 64
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    6

    FS has softened up my friend

    I've got a friend who has always ridden FS. Always. Its taken its toll. He has gotten terribly lazy. He lands front wheel first on every drop because he's got 5 inches of travel to eat it up. He is stiff in the air and on landings. Of course, it doesn't hurt him to be because his suspension eats up all the impact. The issue is that I don't really have the right to complain, as he keeps up just fine and is usually faster on a non-technical descent. He also thinks that he's really good, when its really just the suspension doing pretty much all of the work.

    The question is, what do I do? Do I do anything? Does anyone else have friends like this?

    note that the friend in question would not recognize this thread as discussing him.

  2. #2
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    9,078

    Re: FS has softened up my friend

    JHC....just ride your bike. That's what I would do.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride View Post
    JHC....just ride your bike. That's what I would do.
    Right, I would, but he's teaching my other freinds who are beginners those habits, and they ride hardtails no less. That's the real problem.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    24

    FS has softened up my friend

    I wouldn't confront him or anything but you could always nicely correct him, I.e. If he's giving pointers while everyone is on the trail you could add something like "well doing that the way Joe Schmo is telling you may work better for a fs bike but since you are riding a hard tail so you may also want to try this technique" if you ever get your other friends alone and they say anything then you could tell them that you aren't that impressed with his lackadaisical mountain biking .

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Burzum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    86
    Sounds like he's good with it, why let it bother you?

  6. #6
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,228
    Quote Originally Posted by bixby View Post
    " ... since you are riding a hard tail so you may also want to try this technique"
    As your bike is more similar to the one the beginners are riding, you can easily point out that the type of bike can make a difference in what tends to work best - or in general add what YOU have found to work on a bike with less suspension.

    Depending on the spot, landing front wheel slightly earlier isn't necessarily wrong.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  7. #7
    Cannondale Snob
    Reputation: RiskEverything's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    715
    Ask him to switch bikes one day. Tell him you're thinking about going FS and want to give his a try.
    '06 Cannondale Rush 1000 4" travel 27lbs
    '04 Cannondale F600 SOBE -STOLEN!
    '96 Cannondale Uber-V 6" travel 30lbs

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    4,522
    Quote Originally Posted by RiskEverything View Post
    Ask him to switch bikes one day. Tell him you're thinking about going FS and want to give his a try.
    Then the thread starters bike ends up broken.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    392
    As long as he's not getting hurt or endangering others, leave him be. Friendly advice to the newbies on the side could be helpful.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    6,260
    Quote Originally Posted by wrecker of tires View Post
    The issue is that I don't really have the right to complain, as he keeps up just fine and is usually faster on a non-technical descent.

    Answered your own question.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    973
    Why can't you teach your other friends?
    Also, if your friends have hardtails, they will find out very soon that they are learning poor technique

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Orthoguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    273
    I'm sure there are riders that could harshly critique your technique. If you enjoy their company let it go. Nobody wants to ride with what they perceive is a know-it-all even though your intentions are good.
    I'm not a vegetarian because I love animals, I just hate vegetables.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by RiskEverything View Post
    Ask him to switch bikes one day. Tell him you're thinking about going FS and want to give his a try.
    This is exactly the kind of idea I was looking for thanks! It would probably help him and if he agreed I would got to ride his $3k bike.

  14. #14
    psycho cyclo addict
    Reputation: edubfromktown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,255

    Ride whatever floats yer boat.. who cares what others ride

    One of my riding cronies got smoked by a guy on a very OLD bike, sportin a kickstand not long ago (and it wound him up to the maxxx, much to my amusement). I've seen people riding dual crown bikes on beginner trails and said nuttin other than hello and watched an occasional hybrid rider bite it hard on technical trails. I'm not the fashion or ride selection police and like it that way

  15. #15
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    10,678
    I think your friend may have poor technique... but that's him not necessary the bike.
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: smilinsteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    8,613
    That's why people buy those fancy bikes isn't it? To allow them to do stuff they couldn't do otherwise?

    If I had a choice of being able to do a drop on an AM bike with crappy form, or to walk around it with a hardtail, I'd choose to do it with crappy form.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    538
    Put him on a HT and see how he does.

    He may himself realize that he is getting lazy and want to "fix" it himself. Or he rides your bike, wants his back and he carries on with his life.

    Doesn't matter.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve View Post
    That's why people buy those fancy bikes isn't it? To allow them to do stuff they couldn't do otherwise?

    If I had a choice of being able to do a drop on an AM bike with crappy form, or to walk around it with a hardtail, I'd choose to do it with crappy form.
    I ride a hardtail and theres nothing that he does that I cant do.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by _Alberto_ View Post
    Put him on a HT and see how he does.

    He may himself realize that he is getting lazy and want to "fix" it himself. Or he rides your bike, wants his back and he carries on with his life.

    Doesn't matter.
    I think that you have found the perfect solution. I know that he wants to be progressive, and I really think that he just is unaware that he's being lazy and that his lazyness is getting in his own way. It doesn't affect me as long as he can keep up, I just want to be helpful.

    If riding a hardail doesn't help him, I'll let sleeping dogs lie.

  20. #20
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,228
    ... maybe he'll just "realise" that you have an inferior bike that does not respond correctly to his riding technique?

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mizzaboom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    432
    Quote Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    ... maybe he'll just "realise" that you have an inferior bike that does not respond correctly to his riding technique?
    Yeah. I know guys like this and I'm willing to bet that is the response unfortunately.
    All good things in all good time

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    608
    A lot of people don't take advice very well if it's not asked for. The best thing to do IMO is set a good example for your newbie friends and let your buddy with the expensive bike ride the way he does until he seeks out some improvement (if that day comes).

    I have been riding a long time and I was recently compelled to buy Brian Lopes book on basic skills to see what it had to say and help a newbie buddy of mine (I didn't actually do it, but I still want to). Maybe pick up a copy and let all your riding buddies look it over.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: masterofnone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,213
    For a birthday present sign him up for a skills camp or something. Otherwise spend a little less time critiquing, concentrate upon your own skills and just ride.
    To appreciate the flowers you must also walk among s**t to know the difference

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: smilinsteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    8,613
    It sounds like jealosy on the part of the OP. Who cares how his form is? I'm sure he's like everyone else; trying to do his best and get better if possible.

    I ride a hardtail and theres nothing that he does that I cant do.
    So in other words, you are better than him, but his FS bike is "cheating", so you can't show him how much better you are?

    I hope that when I'm riding, or skiing, or anything else with my friends, they don't have such snide thoughts about me.

    On the other hand, I often have my friends who are better than me giving me pointers, which I welcome. Its a great advantage to have a friend like that.

    So, what's the big deal about talking about technique with a friend, and why instead are you posting about his bad form on the internet instead?

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: skiahh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,572
    Quote Originally Posted by wrecker of tires View Post
    I've got a friend who has always ridden FS. Always. Its taken its toll. He has gotten terribly lazy. He lands front wheel first on every drop because he's got 5 inches of travel to eat it up. He is stiff in the air and on landings. Of course, it doesn't hurt him to be because his suspension eats up all the impact. The issue is that I don't really have the right to complain, as he keeps up just fine and is usually faster on a non-technical descent. He also thinks that he's really good, when its really just the suspension doing pretty much all of the work.

    The question is, what do I do? Do I do anything? Does anyone else have friends like this?

    note that the friend in question would not recognize this thread as discussing him.
    I think you should tell him flat out. Don't pull any punches.

    Then he'll see just what kind of "friend" you really are and will hopefully correct his mistake.

    Quote Originally Posted by wrecker of tires View Post
    Does anyone else have friends like this?
    Lots... but none like you.

  26. #26
    No Stranger to danger....
    Reputation: Tone's's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    4,596
    Sounds like your mate has got a bike that suits him, theres no problem with not having great technique if your bike covers for you, as long as your having fun.
    Sounds like his money spent on a fs has been worth it for him, its not all about doing everything right, its about having fun.
    OP you might want to get a FS, you might love it bro, i like the fact that they are more forgiving than HTs, cheers
    Dont ever let the truth get in the way of a funny story....

  27. #27
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,502
    Quote Originally Posted by wrecker of tires View Post
    The issue is that I don't really have the right to complain, as he keeps up just fine and is usually faster on a non-technical descent. He also thinks that he's really good, when its really just the suspension doing pretty much all of the work.
    It is rare to find a regular riding partner that is a match for your pace, push and general speed. If the man is game to ride and keeps up, there is no reason to give unsolicited advice. Teach by example. If your technique is perfect and you are faster, he IS watching what you do and may refine his riding style and lines just to keep up.

    P.S. Ive ridden FS bikes always too. You approach lines differently on purpose. If i hit a rocky technical section at speed i am looking at the spot i want to exit the section and will unweight and "float" or even bunny hop over a crappy line a hard tail would never think about. You could make the same argument that I suck and its my suspension doing all the work i suppose. Dosent change the fact that its a slightly different riding style requiring a slightly different approach. A crappy rider on a FS isnt going to be fast just because of the bike.

  28. #28
    bikeaholic
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    704
    Try not to worry about what other people are doing on their bikes. Instead, concentrate on continually improving your riding and your abilities.

    Another good rule of thumb is don't offer riding/mechanical advice to anyone unless they ask for it. There's nothing worse than a know-it-all on the trail.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    6
    Sure I understand that i don't need to be a know it all, its just that we're doing harder lines and he's crashing a good bit. I'm only trying to be helpful. And yes, this winter I'm planning on building up a FS from a second hand frame.



    [QUOTE]I think you should tell him flat out. Don't pull any punches.

    Then he'll see just what kind of "friend" you really are and will hopefully correct his mistake./QUOTE]

    Actually we're really good friends and he'd probably listen to me. Of course, if I used the loathing that you used, then yes you're correct i wouldn't have any friends.

  30. #30
    Perpetual n00b
    Reputation: dgw2jr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,760
    Sounds like you need to stand up more to take pressure off your perineum...
    The leg bone's connected to the Cash Bone!

  31. #31
    Rock n' Roller
    Reputation: snowgypsy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    268
    you could trick your friend into seeing how truly awesome you are...or you know...you could keep riding and well, having fun with your "friend."

    I ride with many people. I make a lot of mistakes - so do they because we are all learning. We all are "great" at some things; not so good at others. I'm very good at technical descents (I'm small and have good balance, so I can handle drops and rock gardens with an ease that is just unfair sometimes). My husband is a speed demon on smooth single track and can charge lines without any fear - how does he do that? Sometimes, we offer each other advice. Other times, we just enjoy the ride.

    Sure, there are people who have bad technique. Even worse, there are those friends who feel that they are better than they actually are and will get themselves and others into loads of trouble (that's annoying and downright dangerous.) And we aren't talking poor technique - we're talking "lying" about what they can and can't do on a bike to impress others - that requires intervention. Poor form? No one is perfect.

    Unless they are in danger of harming themselves or others, ride your bike, your way, and have fun...Learn by doing and by showing and by watching...and enjoy the ride. That is, you know, the point.

  32. #32
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    4,816
    Quote Originally Posted by skiahh View Post
    I think you should tell him flat out. Don't pull any punches.
    ^^^This. Only make sure to use REAL punches! It's the only way his kind will ever learn!

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    2,830
    Not going to win a gun fight with a knife. Here in New England, FS is much better for my aging back, faster down hill too. Think HT's 'S are superior? Just Pedal I say. What are you trails like? Mine have small rocks covered with big rocks with spots of dirt and big rock slabs to hold them together. Logs and trees for sport too.

  34. #34
    Oh, I've GOT bike money
    Reputation: JACKL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,322
    I was going to post in this thread to kill time, but I don't really even know what it's about.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    124
    I have some really close friends with whom I do a number of activities, and we often discuss the details of various aspects of our sports (golf being the main one). One of my friends uses a long putter which I think goes against the way the game should be played. We talk about that issue, but I would never try to change my friend's choice - he putts better with the long one. Since there are so many different ways to accomplish the same goal, the discussions generally center around how to do something better. If your friend is as close as you say, I would imagine you could have the discussion about the plusses and minuses of both HT and FS bikes, and maybe both of you would be enlightened by the comments of the other.

    But in the end, you probably just keep working on your own technique and let the others enjoy their rides. If a disparity between the riders evolves, then you might need to discuss why that is happening. Talking about the technical aspects of riding on a theoretical level might help all of you.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    956
    The fun of mountain biking is that you can suck at it but no one can see you sucking.

    Road riding? To public. Even non-cyclists can see you flailing around and struggling up the hills.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    170
    It is not the bike that makes the rider fast; it is the rider that makes the bike fast.

    I got my first mountain bike in 1991. I have raced and ridden thousands of miles.

    A few times, I have had the pleasure of riding with truly skilled riders - both on the road and off. I hope you get the chance to do the same. If you do, watch them and learn. They have no need to tell you how good their technique is. You will see it for yourself.
    Last edited by crit_boy; 08-27-2013 at 10:00 PM. Reason: tablet auto-correct

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: smilinsteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    8,613
    Quote Originally Posted by crit_boy View Post
    It is not the bike that makes the ride fast; it isn't he rider that makes the bike fast.
    I'm so confused!


    I got my first mountain bike in 1991. I have raced and ridden thousands of miles.

    A few times, I have had the pleasure of riding with truly skilled riders - both on the road and off. I hope you get the chance to do the same. If you do, watch them and learn. They have no need to tell you how good their technique is. You will see it for yourself.
    My typical double black ski run with one of my best buddies:

    "Jeeezus you look like crap! What the hell was that?" etc.

    It doesn't hurt my feelings. In fact, I love it. You can't pay an instructor to give you that kind of feedback.
    Last edited by smilinsteve; 08-27-2013 at 10:06 PM.

  39. #39
    Cannondale Snob
    Reputation: RiskEverything's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    715
    I started on HTs, moved to FS, and want to get a HT again, and maybe a rigid SS.

    I ride my FS way different than I rode my HT. I pick horrible lines and plow over things just because I can. I call it training for when I encounter a trail so rough that the good lines are as tough as my bad lines. Sometimes, I just plow over things to slow down without using the brakes. When I'm tired, I just pick better lines
    '06 Cannondale Rush 1000 4" travel 27lbs
    '04 Cannondale F600 SOBE -STOLEN!
    '96 Cannondale Uber-V 6" travel 30lbs

  40. #40
    T.W.O.
    Reputation: mimi1885's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    8,158
    Quote Originally Posted by wrecker of tires View Post

    The question is, Does anyone else have friends like this?
    No, I know a few like you Don't sweat it, when he gets more serious he'll seek out the lessons and get better then the question would be can you keep up with him.

    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve View Post
    That's why people buy those fancy bikes isn't it? To allow them to do stuff they couldn't do otherwise?

    If I had a choice of being able to do a drop on an AM bike with crappy form, or to walk around it with a hardtail, I'd choose to do it with crappy form.
    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve View Post
    It sounds like jealosy on the part of the OP. Who cares how his form is? I'm sure he's like everyone else; trying to do his best and get better if possible.



    So in other words, you are better than him, but his FS bike is "cheating", so you can't show him how much better you are?

    I hope that when I'm riding, or skiing, or anything else with my friends, they don't have such snide thoughts about me.

    On the other hand, I often have my friends who are better than me giving me pointers, which I welcome. Its a great advantage to have a friend like that.

    So, what's the big deal about talking about technique with a friend, and why instead are you posting about his bad form on the internet instead?
    I think SS, said it best. I'm a cheater and proud of it

  41. #41
    OMG!
    Reputation: adjunkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    412
    tldr

  42. #42
    nOOb
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    399
    I'm the opposite way. I started way back on rigid bikes, and gradually evolved to full suspension. I still raise up off the saddle and let my legs take too much of the hits when I should be staying seated and letting the suspension work for me. I have yet to have anyone on a ride holler at me yet.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: masterofnone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,213
    Quote Originally Posted by nOOky View Post
    I'm the opposite way. I started way back on rigid bikes, and gradually evolved to full suspension. I still raise up off the saddle and let my legs take too much of the hits when I should be staying seated and letting the suspension work for me. I have yet to have anyone on a ride holler at me yet.
    Ya, me too. I started riding when forks had elastomers and "rebound damping" was the newest thing. I still pick my butt up off the seat for the bigger lumpier stuff. I'm probably from the old school of thought that your arms and legs will always be better suspension than any spring and hydraulic cartridge. If I'm wrong explain to me why you'll never see a downhiller riding down the mountain with their butt cheeks glued to the seat? How can a dirt jumper do what they do with their butt cheeks on the seat?
    To appreciate the flowers you must also walk among s**t to know the difference

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation: toot334455's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    254
    I ride a HT and I want a full suspension so I can sit down on tight bumpy turns at high speeds where you need your center of balance to be on the saddle

    is that cheating?

  45. #45
    T.W.O.
    Reputation: mimi1885's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    8,158
    Quote Originally Posted by toot334455 View Post
    I ride a HT and I want a full suspension so I can sit down on tight bumpy turns at high speeds where you need your center of balance to be on the saddle

    is that cheating?
    Cheating? NO. What you described would make the ride thru the section more difficult and challenging, how is it cheating?

  46. #46
    Trail Ninja
    Reputation: Varaxis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    4,650
    It depends on how you define cheating. On the FS, he can ride faster through more technical stuff, without any additional effort. The bike is more capable, and does more of the work. All he is doing is experiencing a new challenge, though the challenge level might not be any higher than going through slower with the HT. If you race someone of similar skill level through such technical terrain, and he's on a HT, having the FS is cheating. The HT would be cheating on the races up long and smooth climbs though. All about perspective and standards. I believe the point is that if the guy got the FS only to ride the technical sections at the same pace as the rest of the group, and they were on HT, then yea, he's cheating himself out of a challenge.
    Spec E29c
    Niner ROS9 SS
    Trek Crockett

    Be part of the solution, not the pollution.

  47. #47
    Yes, that's fonetic
    Reputation: whoda*huck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    3,892
    I wouldn't say the fs guy is cheating. It's just that the ht guy is equipment challenged...

  48. #48
    T.W.O.
    Reputation: mimi1885's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    8,158
    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    It depends on how you define cheating. On the FS, he can ride faster through more technical stuff, without any additional effort. The bike is more capable, and does more of the work. All he is doing is experiencing a new challenge, though the challenge level might not be any higher than going through slower with the HT. If you race someone of similar skill level through such technical terrain, and he's on a HT, having the FS is cheating. The HT would be cheating on the races up long and smooth climbs though. All about perspective and standards. I believe the point is that if the guy got the FS only to ride the technical sections at the same pace as the rest of the group, and they were on HT, then yea, he's cheating himself out of a challenge.
    Agree. FS would allow for wider margin of errors. What he was saying simply the misunderstanding of what FS can offer and where the CG should be.

    Quote Originally Posted by toot334455 View Post
    I ride a HT and I want a full suspension so I can sit down on tight bumpy turns at high speeds where you need your center of balance to be on the saddle

    is that cheating?
    Unless he's on a 20" travel moto there's no sitting, plus sitting bring your CG high, if not the highest point on the bike. Low CG would be standing and put the weight on the pedals where it's the lowest contact point

  49. #49
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    4,816
    Quote Originally Posted by nOOky View Post
    I'm the opposite way. I started way back on rigid bikes, and gradually evolved to full suspension. I still raise up off the saddle and let my legs take too much of the hits when I should be staying seated and letting the suspension work for me. I have yet to have anyone on a ride holler at me yet.
    Let 'em holler.

  50. #50
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    4,816
    Quote Originally Posted by toot334455 View Post
    I ride a HT and I want a full suspension so I can sit down on tight bumpy turns at high speeds where you need your center of balance to be on the saddle

    is that cheating?
    If that's cheating, then my SS conversion of a 5" travel Jamis Dakar XLT frame is sacrilege!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. cleaning bike with softened water?
    By jbourne84 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-10-2013, 09:18 PM
  2. Getting a friend into it.
    By Rooney in forum All Mountain
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-01-2012, 07:10 AM
  3. We all have that one friend...
    By big0mike in forum Arizona
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 01-26-2012, 05:37 AM
  4. Friend
    By Maadjurguer in forum Arizona
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11-28-2011, 09:58 AM
  5. Looking for a friend
    By mlepito in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-02-2011, 04:22 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •